Carson Chan

  • Eva Grubinger

    Eva Grubinger

    Decoy

    Carson Chan

    Over the past few years, Eva Grubinger's work has investigated the definition of public, institutional, and museum spaces through installations and objects. In these works, ruptures or breaks in the assumed function of space or site-specific installations, as well as those involving the allocation of content to employed forms, play a significant role.

    Decoy documents the eponymous exhibition at Landesgalerie Linz in 2011 in which Grubinger presented large-scale sculptural works, all of which referenced the fishing—lures, mooring rings, a dock—and both subtly and explicitly engaged a vocabulary of the alluring. The catalogue includes an introduction by Martin Hochleitner and an essay by Carson Chan.

    • Paperback $28.00
  • Higher Atlas/Au-delà de l'Atlas

    Higher Atlas/Au-delà de l'Atlas

    The Marrakech Biennale [4] in Context

    Carson Chan and Nadim Samman

    Higher Atlas: The Marrakech Biennale in Context [4] brings together a collection of texts that dilates on the social and historical context, history, and contemporary reality of exhibition making in North Africa and in particular, Morocco. For Chan and Samman, the exhibition is the primary locus of artistic information; firsthand experience of the work is the best way to understand it. The catalogue, published in English and French, with an Arabic online edition to follow, is intended to provide a context for the exhibition within preexisting and future frameworks for understanding some of the considerations that went into this edition of the Marrakech Biennale.

    Contributors Carson Chan, Anthony Gardner, Kerryn Greenberg, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Beral Madra, Simon Njami, Katarzyna Pieprzak, Alice Planel, Holiday Powers, Véronique Rieffel, Nadim Samman, and Jessica Winegar

    Further contributions by جماعة, Younes Baba-Ali, Barkow Liebinger Architects, Centre des Arts Contemporains Marrakech, Joe Clark, CocoRosie, Hassan Darsi, Aleksandra Domanović, Sophie Erlund, Tue Greenfort, Eva Grubinger, Hadley + Maxwell, Elín Hansdóttir, Ethan Hayes-Chute, Roger Hiorns, Katia Kameli, Felix Kiessling, Faouzi Laatiris, Juliana Cerqueira Leite, Megumi Matsubara, Jürgen Mayer H., Christopher Mayo, Jon Nash, Karthik Pandian, Finnbogi Pétursson, Alexander Ponomarev, Luca Pozzi, Katarzyna Przezwańska, Florian & Michael Quistrebert, Andrew Ranville, Anri Sala, Alex Schweder La & Khadija Carroll La, Matthew Stone & Phoebe Collings-James, Pascale Marthine Tayou, Sinta Werner, Leung Chi Wo

    • Paperback $27.00

Contributor

  • The Nightmare of Participation

    The Nightmare of Participation

    (Crossbench Praxis as a Mode of Criticality)

    Markus Miessen

    Welcome to Harmonistan! Over the last decade, the term “participation” has become increasingly overused. When everyone has been turned into a participant, the often uncritical, innocent, and romantic use of the term has become frightening. Supported by a repeatedly nostalgic veneer of worthiness, phony solidarity, and political correctness, participation has become the default of politicians withdrawing from responsibility. Similar to the notion of an independent politician dissociated from a specific party, this third part of Miessen's “Participation” trilogy encourages the role of what he calls the “crossbench practitioner,” an “uninterested outsider” and “uncalled participator” who is not limited by existing protocols, and who enters the arena with nothing but creative intellect and the will to generate change.

    Miessen argues for an urgent inversion of participation, a model beyond modes of consensus. Instead of reading participation as the charitable savior of political struggle, Miessen candidly reflects on the limits and traps of its real motivations. Rather than breading the next generation of consensual facilitators and mediators, he argues for conflict as an enabling, instead of disabling, force. The book calls for a format of conflictual participation—no longer a process by which others are invited “in,” but a means of acting without mandate, as uninvited irritant: a forced entry into fields of knowledge that arguably benefit from exterior thinking. Sometimes, democracy has to be avoided at all costs.

    Markus Miessen (*1978) is an architect, consultant, and writer based in Berlin. He runs the collaborative agency for spatial practice Studio Miessen and is director of the Winter School Middle East (Kuwait). Miessen has taught at institutions such as the Architectural Association (London), Columbia, and MIT. He is currently a Professor for Architecture and Curatorial Practice at the Hochschule für Gestaltung in Karlsruhe, Germany, a Harvard Fellow, and completing his PhD at the Centre for Research Architecture (Goldsmiths, London). www.studiomiessen.com

    • Paperback $19.95