Catherine de Zegher

Catherine de Zegher was Director of The Drawing Center in New York from 1999 to 2006. She is the editor of Inside the Visible: An Elliptical Traverse of Twentieth Century Art in, of, and from the Feminine (MIT Press, 1996).

  • Women Artists at the Millennium

    Women Artists at the Millennium

    Carol Armstrong and Catherine de Zegher

    Artists, art historians, and critics look at the legacies of feminism and critical theory in the work of women artists, more than thirty years after the beginning of the modern women's movement and Linda Nochlin's landmark essay "Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?"

    More than thirty years after the birth of the modern women's movement and the beginnings of feminist art-making and art history, the time is ripe to examine the legacies of those revolutions. In Women Artists at the Millennium, artists, art historians, and critics examine the differences that feminist art practice and critical theory have made in late twentieth-century art and the discourses surrounding it. In 1971, when Linda Nochlin published her essay "Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?" in a special issue of Art News, there were no women's studies, no feminist theory, no such thing as feminist art criticism; there was instead a focus on the mythic figure of the great (male) artist through history. Since then, the "woman artist" has not simply been assimilated into the canon of "greatness" but has expanded art-making into a multiplicity of practices with new parameters and perspectives. In Women Artists at the Millennium artists including Martha Rosler and Yvonne Rainer reflect upon their own varied practices and art historians discuss the innovative work of such figures as Louise Bourgeois, Lygia Clark, Mona Hatoum, and Carrie Mae Weems. And Linda Nochlin considers changes since her landmark essay and looks to the future, writing, "We will need all our wit and courage to make sure that women's voices are heard, their work seen and written about."

    Artist Pages By: Ellen Gallagher, Ann Hamilton, Mary Kelly, Yvonne Rainer, Martha Rosler

    Contributing Writers: Emily Apter, Carol Armstrong, Catherine de Zegher, Maria DiBattista, Brigid Doherty, Briony Fer, Tamar Garb, Anne Higonnet, Ewa Lajer-Burcharth, Molly Nesbit, Mignon Nixon, Linda Nochlin, Griselda Pollock, Abigail Solomon-Godeau, Lisa Tickner, Anne Wagner

    • Hardcover $43.00
    • Paperback $29.95
  • The Activist Drawing

    The Activist Drawing

    Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant's New Babylon to Beyond

    Catherine de Zegher and Mark Wigley

    A reconsideration of Constant Nieuwenhuys's visionary architectural project, New Babylon, and of the role of drawing in and electronic age.

    Dutch artist Constant Nieuwenhuys (b. 1920) developed his visionary architectural project New Babylon between 1956 and 1974. Emerging out of the remarkable activist group the Situationist International, the project was concerned with issues of "unitary urbanism" and the future of art in a technocratic society. It has had a major impact on subsequent generations of artists, architects, and urbanists. Exploring the intersection of drawing, utopianism, and activism in a multimedia era, The Activist Drawing not only traces this historical moment but reveals surprisingly contemporary issues about the relationship between a fully automated environment and human creativity.

    Several decades before the current debate about architecture in the supposedly placeless electronic age, Constant conceived an urban and architectural model that literally envisaged the World Wide Web. The inhabitants of his New Babylon drift through huge labyrinthine interiors, perpetually reconstructing every aspect of the environment according to their latest desires. Walls, floors, lighting, sound, color, texture, and smell keep changing. This network of vast "sectors" can be seen as a physical embodiment of the Internet, where people configure their individual Web sites and wander from site to site without limits. With its parallels to our virtual world, New Babylon seems as radical today as when it was created.

    The essays explore the relevance of Constant's utopian work to that of his peers in the Situationist International and experimental architectural movements of the 1960s, as well as later generations of architects and artists. They use Constant's revolutionary project as a springboard to reconsider the role of drawing in an electronic age.

    Copublished with the Drawing Center, New York City.

    Contributors Benjamin Buchloh, Constant Nieuwenhuys, Rosalyn Deutsche, Catherine de Zegher, Elizabeth Diller, Tom McDonough, Martha Rosler, Bernard Tschumi, Anthony Vidler, Mark Wigley

    • Hardcover $32.00
  • Inside the Visible

    Inside the Visible

    An Elliptical Traverse of 20th Century Art in, of, and From the Feminine

    Catherine de Zegher

    Published on the occasion of a major exhibition opening at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Inside the Visible presents a gendered reading of more than thirty women artists of vastly different background and experience. The work of important yet previously "invisible" figures is highlighted alongside the work of established artists to create a retheorized interpretation of the art of this century. Structured in terms of recurrent cycles over time, Inside the Visible focuses on three periods (the 1930s and 1940s, the 1960s and 1970s, and the 1990s) that anticipated a wave of political repression, nationalism, and xenophopia, often stimulating artistic production that redefined practice. Illustrated essays document each artist in the collection. In addition, four general essays trace the connections among the artists. These take up such issues as why artistic recognition eluded certain artists and why their work is only just becoming visible today. They also address overlapping themes such as gender and sexuality; the intersection of racial, class, ethnic, sexual, and regional identities; and the nature of the relationship between work and viewer.

    • Paperback $40.00

Contributor

  • Inventing Future Cities

    Inventing Future Cities

    Michael Batty

    How we can invent—but not predict—the future of cities.

    We cannot predict future cities, but we can invent them. Cities are largely unpredictable because they are complex systems that are more like organisms than machines. Neither the laws of economics nor the laws of mechanics apply; cities are the product of countless individual and collective decisions that do not conform to any grand plan. They are the product of our inventions; they evolve. In Inventing Future Cities, Michael Batty explores what we need to understand about cities in order to invent their future.

    Batty outlines certain themes—principles—that apply to all cities. He investigates not the invention of artifacts but inventive processes. Today form is becoming ever more divorced from function; information networks now shape the traditional functions of cities as places of exchange and innovation. By the end of this century, most of the world's population will live in cities, large or small, sometimes contiguous, and always connected; in an urbanized world, it will be increasingly difficult to define a city by its physical boundaries.

    Batty discusses the coming great transition from a world with few cities to a world of all cities; argues that future cities will be defined as clusters in a hierarchy; describes the future “high-frequency,” real-time streaming city; considers urban sprawl and urban renewal; and maps the waves of technological change, which grow ever more intense and lead to continuous innovation—an unending process of creative destruction out of which future cities will emerge.

    • Hardcover $27.95
  • The New Science of Cities

    The New Science of Cities

    Michael Batty

    A proposal for a new way to understand cities and their design not as artifacts but as systems composed of flows and networks.

    In The New Science of Cities, Michael Batty suggests that to understand cities we must view them not simply as places in space but as systems of networks and flows. To understand space, he argues, we must understand flows, and to understand flows, we must understand networks—the relations between objects that compose the system of the city. Drawing on the complexity sciences, social physics, urban economics, transportation theory, regional science, and urban geography, and building on his own previous work, Batty introduces theories and methods that reveal the deep structure of how cities function.

    Batty presents the foundations of a new science of cities, defining flows and their networks and introducing tools that can be applied to understanding different aspects of city structure. He examines the size of cities, their internal order, the transport routes that define them, and the locations that fix these networks. He introduces methods of simulation that range from simple stochastic models to bottom-up evolutionary models to aggregate land-use transportation models. Then, using largely the same tools, he presents design and decision-making models that predict interactions and flows in future cities. These networks emphasize a notion with relevance for future research and planning: that design of cities is collective action.

    • Hardcover $50.00
    • Paperback $35.00
  • An Invitation to Cognitive Science, Second Edition, Volume 1

    An Invitation to Cognitive Science, Second Edition, Volume 1

    Language

    Lila Gleitman, Mark Liberman, and Daniel N. Osherson

    An Invitation to Cognitive Science provides a point of entry into the vast realm of cognitive science, offering selected examples of issues and theories from many of its subfields. All of the volumes in the second edition contain substantially revised and as well as entirely new chapters.

    Rather than surveying theories and data in the manner characteristic of many introductory textbooks in the field, An Invitation to Cognitive Science employs a unique case study approach, presenting a focused research topic in some depth and relying on suggested readings to convey the breadth of views and results. Each chapter tells a coherent scientific story, whether developing themes and ideas or describing a particular model and exploring its implications.

    The volumes are self contained and can be used individually in upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses ranging from introductory psychology, linguistics, cognitive science, and decision sciences, to social psychology, philosophy of mind, rationality, language, and vision science.

    • Hardcover $65.00
    • Paperback $45.00