David Kirsh

David Kirsh is Assistant Professor in the Department of Cognitive Science at the University of California, San Diego.

  • Foundations Of Artificial Intelligence

    Foundations Of Artificial Intelligence

    David Kirsh

    In the 11 contributions, theorists historically associated with each position identify the basic tenets of their position.

    Have the classical methods and ideas of AI outlived their usefulness? Foundations of Artificial Intelligence critically evaluates the fundamental assumptions underpinning the dominant approaches to AI. In the 11 contributions, theorists historically associated with each position identify the basic tenets of their position. They discuss the underlying principles, describe the natural types of problems and tasks in which their approach succeeds, explain where its power comes from, and what its scope and limits are. Theorists generally skeptical of these positions evaluate the effectiveness of the method or approach and explain why it works - to the extent they believe it does - and why it eventually fails.

    Contents Foundations of AI: The Big Issues, D. Kirsh • Logic and Artificial Intelligence, N. J. Nilsson • Rigor Mortis: A Response to Nilsson's 'Logic and Artificial Intelligence,' L. Birnbaum • Open Information Systems Semantics for Distributed Artificial Intelligence, C. Hewitt • Social Conceptions of Knowledge and Action: DAI Foundations and Open Systems Semantics, L. Gasser • Intelligence without Representation, R. A. Brooks • Today the Earwig, Tomorrow Man? D. Kirsh • On the Thresholds of Knowledge, D. B. Lenat, E. A. Feigenbaum • The Owl and the Electric Encyclopedia, B. C. Smith • A Preliminary Analysis of the Soar Architecture as a Basis for General Intelligence, P. S. Rosenbloom, J. E. Laird, A. Newell, R. McCarl • Approaches to the Study of Intelligence, D. A. Norman

    • Paperback $9.75

Contributor

  • The Internet and American Business

    The Internet and American Business

    William Aspray and Paul E. Ceruzzi

    The effect of a commercialized Internet on American business, from the boom in e-commerce and adjustments by bricks-and-mortar businesses to file-sharing and community building.

    When we think of the Internet, we generally think of Amazon, Google, Hotmail, Napster, MySpace, and other sites for buying products, searching for information, downloading entertainment, chatting with friends, or posting photographs. In the academic literature about the Internet, however, these uses are rarely covered. The Internet and American Business fills this gap, picking up where most scholarly histories of the Internet leave off—with the commercialization of the Internet established and its effect on traditional business a fact of life. These essays, describing challenges successfully met by some companies and failures to adapt by others, are a first attempt to understand a dynamic and exciting period of American business history. Tracing the impact of the commercialized Internet since 1995 on American business and society, the book describes new business models, new companies and adjustments by established companies, the rise of e-commerce, and community building; it considers dot-com busts and difficulties encountered by traditional industries; and it discusses such newly created problems as copyright violations associated with music file-sharing and the proliferation of Internet pornography.

    Contributors Atsushi Akera, William Aspray, Randal A. Beam, Martin Campbell-Kelly, Paul E. Ceruzzi, James W. Cortada, Wolfgang Coy, Blaise Cronin, Nathan Ensmenger, Daniel D. Garcia-Swartz, Brent Goldfarb, Shane Greenstein, Thomas Haigh, Ward Hanson, David Kirsch, Christine Ogan, Jeffrey R.

    • Hardcover $53.00
    • Paperback $45.00