David Lapoujade

David Lapoujade (born in 1964) is a French philosopher and a professor at the Université Paris-I Panthéon-Sorbonne. In addition to editing the posthumous collections of Deleuze's writings, Desert Islands and Two Regimes of Madness (both published in English by Semiotext(e)), he has written on pragmatism and the work of William James.

  • Aberrant Movements

    Aberrant Movements

    The Philosophy of Gilles Deleuze

    David Lapoujade

    One of the first comprehensive treatments of Deleuzian thought.

    There is always something schizophrenic about logic in Deleuze, which represents another distinctive characteristic: a deep perversion of the very heart of philosophy. Thus, a preliminary definition of Deleuze's philosophy emerges: an irrational logic of aberrant movements. —from Aberrant Movements

    In Aberrant Movements, David Lapoujade offers one of the first comprehensive treatments of Deleuzian thought. Drawing on the entirety of Deleuze's work as well as his collaborations with Félix Guattari, from the “transcendental empiricism” of Difference and Repetition to the schizoanalysis and geophilosophy of Anti-Oedipus and A Thousand Plateaus, Lapoujade explores the central problem underlying the delirious coherence of Deleuze's philosophy: aberrant movements. These are the movements that Deleuze wrests from Kantian idealism, Nietzsche's eternal return, and the nonsense of Lewis Carroll; they are the schizophrenic processes of the unconscious and the nomadic line of flight traversing history—in short, the forces that permeate life and thought. Tracing and classifying their “irrational logics” represent the quintessential tasks of Deleuzian philosophy.

    Rather than abstract notions, though, these logics constitute various modes of populating the earth—involving the human as much as the animal, physical, and chemical—and the affective, mental, and political populations that populate human thought. Lapoujade argues that aberrant movements become the figures in a combat against the forms of political, social, philosophical, aesthetic, and scientific organization that attempt to deny, counter, or crush their existence. In this study of a thinker whose insights, theoretical confrontations, and perverse critiques have profoundly influenced philosophy, literature, film, and art over the last fifty years, Lapoujade invites us to join in the discordant harmonies of Deleuze's work—and in the battle that constitutes the thought of philosophy, politics, and life.

    • Paperback $18.95 £14.99
  • Two Regimes of Madness, Revised Edition

    Two Regimes of Madness, Revised Edition

    Texts and Interviews 1975–1995

    Gilles Deleuze and David Lapoujade

    Texts and interviews from the period that saw the publication of Deleuze's major works.

    People tend to confuse winning freedom with conversion to capitalism. It is doubtful that the joys of capitalism are enough to free peoples.... The American “revolution” failed long ago, long before the Soviet one. Revolutionary situations and attempts are born of capitalism itself and will not soon disappear, alas. Philosophy remains tied to a revolutionary becoming that is not to be confused with the history of revolutions.—from Two Regimes of Madness

    Covering the last twenty years of Gilles Deleuze's life (1975-1995), the texts and interviews gathered in this volume complete those collected in Desert Islands and Other Texts (1953-1974). This period saw the publication of his major works: A Thousand Plateaus (1980), Cinema I: Image-Movement (1983), Cinema II: Image-Time (1985), all leading through language, concept and art to What is Philosophy? (1991). Two Regimes of Madness also documents Deleuze's increasing involvement with politics (with Toni Negri, for example, the Italian philosopher and professor accused of associating with the Red Brigades). Both volumes were conceived by the author himself and will be his last. Michel Foucault famously wrote: “One day, perhaps, this century will be Deleuzian.” This book provides a prodigious entry into the work of the most important philosopher of our time. Unlike Foucault, Deleuze never stopped digging further into the same furrow. Concepts for him came from life. He was a vitalist and remained one to the last. This volume restores the full text of the original French edition.

    • Paperback $19.95 £14.99
  • Desert Islands

    Desert Islands

    and Other Texts, 1953–1974

    Gilles Deleuze and David Lapoujade

    A fascinating anthology of texts and interviews written over 20 years by renowned French philosopher Gilles Deleuze.

    "One day, perhaps, this century will be Deleuzian," Michel Foucault once wrote. This book anthologizes 40 texts and interviews written over 20 years by renowned French philosopher Gilles Deleuze, who died in 1995. The early texts, from 1953-1966 (on Rousseau, Kafka, Jarry, etc.), belong to literary criticism and announce Deleuze's last book, Critique and Clinic (1993). But philosophy clearly predominates in the rest of the book, with sharp appraisals of the thinkers he always felt indebted to: Spinoza, Bergson. More surprising is his acknowledgement of Jean-Paul Sartre as his master. "The new themes, a certain new style, a new aggressive and polemical way of raising questions," he wrote, "come from Sartre." But the figure of Nietzsche remains by far the most seminal, and the presence throughout of his friends and close collaborators, Felix Guattari and Michel Foucault. The book stops shortly after the publication of Anti-Oedipus, and presents a kind of genealogy of Deleuze's thought as well as his attempt to leave philosophy and connect it to the outside—but, he cautions, as a philosopher.

    • Paperback $19.95 £14.99

Contributor

  • Aesthetics of Standstill

    Aesthetics of Standstill

    Reinhold Görling, Barbara Gronau, and Ludger Schwarte

    Essays consider the temporality and the aesthetics of “standstill.”

    "Standstill” could be the name for the kind of experience that is the hiatus between social expectations and real possibilities of agency. Standstill may also be the name of an aesthetic strategy to instill a nonlinear time of resistance and experience into the political protocol of progress. Finally, standstill can be the name for the temporal fissure in the midst of the subject, for the lapse between the subject of the enunciation and the subject of a statement, the limit that is the border between the inside and the outside. It can be the name for the mode of potentiality, for the moment of gesture, or, with Walter Benjamin, the medium of the dialectical image. The essays of this book traverse these dimensions of standstill as an in-between of time.

    Contributors Georges Didi-Huberman, Reinhold Görling, Barbara Gronau, Adrian Heathfield, Erika Fischer-Lichte, Oliver Marchart, Rita McBride, Christoph Menke, Aernout Mik, Misha Kavka, David Lapoujade, Mirjam Lewandowsky, Via Lewandowsky, Peter Osborne, Christine Ross, Marcel Odenbach, Jacques Rancière, Ludger Schwarte, Martin Seel

    • Paperback $28.00