Dominique Foray

Dominique Foray holds the Chair in Economics and Management of Innovation and is Director of the College of Management of Technology at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. He is the author of The Economics of Knowledge (MIT Press, 2004).

  • Advancing Knowledge and The Knowledge Economy

    Advancing Knowledge and The Knowledge Economy

    Brian Kahin and Dominique Foray

    The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge. The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation—and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.

    Contributors Berglind Ásgeirsdóttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-Åke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stéphan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

    • Hardcover $17.75 £14.99
    • Paperback $40.00 £32.00
  • The Economics of Knowledge

    The Economics of Knowledge

    Dominique Foray

    The economics of knowledge is a rapidly emerging subdiscipline of economics that has never before been given the comprehensive and cohesive treatment found in this book. Dominique Foray analyzes the deep conceptual and structural transformation of our economic activities that has led to a gradual shift to knowledge-intensive activities. This transformation is the result of the collision of a longstanding trend—the expansion of knowledge-based investments and activities—with a technological revolution that radically altered the production and transmission of knowledge and information. The book focuses on the dual nature of the economics of knowledge: its emergence as a discipline (which Foray calls "the economics of knowledge") and the historical development of a particular period in the growth and organization of economic activities ("the knowledge-based economy"). The book, which alternates between analysis of the economic transformation and examination of the tools and concepts of the discipline, begins by discussing "knowledge" as an economic good and the historical development of the knowledge-based economies. It then develops a conceptual framework for considering the issues raised. Topics considered in the remaining chapters include forms of knowledge production, codification and infusion, incentives and institutions for the efficient production of knowledge (including discussions of private markets and "open" sources), and knowledge management as a new organizational capability. Finally, the book addresses policy concerns suggested by the uneven development of knowledge across different sectors and by the need to find ways of reclaiming the public dimension of knowledge from an essentially privatized knowledge revolution.

    • Hardcover $35.00 £28.00
    • Paperback $25.00 £20.00

Contributor

  • Revolutionizing Innovation

    Revolutionizing Innovation

    Users, Communities, and Open Innovation

    Dietmar Harhoff and Karim R. Lakhani

    A comprehensive and multidisciplinary view of the emerging paradigm of user and open innovation, offering both theoretical and empirical perspectives.

    The last two decades have witnessed an extraordinary growth of new models of managing and organizing the innovation process that emphasizes users over producers. Large parts of the knowledge economy now routinely rely on users, communities, and open innovation approaches to solve important technological and organizational problems. This view of innovation, pioneered by the economist Eric von Hippel, counters the dominant paradigm, which cast the profit-seeking incentives of firms as the main driver of technical change. In a series of influential writings, von Hippel and colleagues found empirical evidence that flatly contradicted the producer-centered model of innovation. Since then, the study of user-driven innovation has continued and expanded, with further empirical exploration of a distributed model of innovation that includes communities and platforms in a variety of contexts and with the development of theory to explain the economic underpinnings of this still emerging paradigm. This volume provides a comprehensive and multidisciplinary view of the field of user and open innovation, reflecting advances in the field over the last several decades.

    The contributors—including many colleagues of Eric von Hippel—offer both theoretical and empirical perspectives from such diverse fields as economics, the history of science and technology, law, management, and policy. The empirical contexts for their studies range from household goods to financial services. After discussing the fundamentals of user innovation, the contributors cover communities and innovation; legal aspects of user and community innovation; new roles for user innovators; user interactions with firms; and user innovation in practice, describing experiments, toolkits, and crowdsourcing, and crowdfunding.

    Contributors Efe Aksuyek, Yochai Benkler, James Bessen, Jörn H. Block, Annika Bock, Helena Canhão, Jeroen P. J. de Jong, Emmanuelle Fauchart, Dominique Foray, Nikolaus Franke, Johann Füller, Helena Garriga, Fred Gault, Fredrik Hacklin, Dietmar Harhoff, Joachim Henkel, Cornelius Herstatt, Christoph Hienerth, Venkat Kuppuswamy, Karim R. Lakhani, Christopher Lettl, Christian Lüthje, Ethan Mollick, Hidehiko Nishikawa, Alessandro Nuvolari, Susumu Ogawa, Pedro Oliveira, Stefan Perkmann Berger, Frank Piller, Christina Raasch, Susanne Roiser, Fabrizio Salvador, Pamela Samuelson, Tim Schweisfurth, Sonali K. Shah, Christoph Stockstrom, Katherine J. Strandburg, Stefan Thomke, Andrew W. Torrance, Mary Tripsas, Georg von Krogh

    • Hardcover $55.00 £45.00