Emily Pethick

  • Wendelien van Oldenborgh

    Wendelien van Oldenborgh

    Amateur

    Emily Pethick, Wendellen van Oldenborgh, and David Morris

    Amateur is the first comprehensive publication about Wendelien van Oldenborgh's moving image works, and their accompanying installations. Developed over the past ten years of her practice, these works explore communication and interaction between individuals, often against the backdrop of a unique public location, in order to cast attention on repressed, incomplete, and unresolved histories. Through the staging of these encounters on film, van Oldenborgh enables multiple perspectives and voices to coexist, and brings to light political, social, and cultural relationships and how they are manifested through social interactions.

    The publication is generously illustrated and brings together a wealth of texts by artists, curators, and writers who have been key interlocutors with van Oldenborgh, and who each offer in-depth observations and reflections on a work from her oeuvre. These authors include Nana Adusei-Poku, Ricardo Basbaum, Frédérique Bergholtz, Eric de Bruyn, Binna Choi, David Dibosa, Denise Ferreira da Silva, Avery F. Gordon, Tom Holert, Nataša Ilić, Charl Landvreugd, Sven Lütticken, Anna Manubens, Ruth Noack, and Grant Watson.

    Amateur is published in conjunction with the Heineken Prize for Art, which van Oldenborgh received in 2014 and is supported by the Mondriaan Fund.

    Copublished with If I Can't Dance, I Don't Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution, and The Showroom

    Contributors Nana Adusei-Poku, Ricardo Basbaum, Frédérique Bergholtz, Eric de Bruyn, Binna Choi, David Dibosa, Denise Ferreira da Silva, Avery F. Gordon, Tom Holert, Nataša Ilić, Charl Landvreugd, Sven Lütticken, Anna Manubens, Ruth Noack, Grant Watson

    • Hardcover $45.00
  • Cluster

    Cluster

    Dialectionary

    Binna Choi, Maria Lind, Emily Pethick, and Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez

    Cluster is a network of eight contemporary visual arts organizations that are each located in residential areas situated on the peripheries of European cities, extending to the Middle East with one member in Holon, Israel. Each organization is focused on commissioning, producing, and presenting contemporary art, and the nature of the work is often experimental, process-driven, involves research, is based on working with international and local artists, and often engages with diverse publics on a local level.

    Compiled after a series of meetings in each organization over a period of two years, Cluster: Dialectionary aims to find new ways to position this work and the work of contemporary visual arts organizations more broadly, particularly in relation to wider social, political, and cultural concerns.

    The book includes essays by Andrea Phillips, Mark Fisher and Nina Möntmann, Marion von Osten, and Cluster members. These are accompanied by a series of keywords that are drawn from the practices and experiences of the people who work at, visit, and live with the organizations. They have both been produced within the contexts of the projects that gave rise to them, as well as written especially for the publication. The contributors include Can Altay, Ayreen Anastas and Rene Gabri, Pierre Bal Blanc, Alexandre Baudelot, Ferran Barenblit, Ricardo Basbaum, Binna Choi, Céline Condorelli, Cooperativa Crater Invertido, Eyal Danon, Julien Duc-Maugé, Udi Edelman, Mark Fisher and Nina Möntmann, Daniel Foucard, Dora Garcia, Rebecca Gordon-Nesbitt, Elaine W. HO, Annette Krauss, Bojana Kunst, Maria Lind, Pablo Martinez, Mattin, Sanne Oorthuizen, Marion von Osten, Emily Pethick, Natasa Petresin-Bachelez, Andrea Phillips, Tadej Pogacar, Dimitrina Sevova, Simon Sheikh, Louise Shelley, Steven Ten Thije, Mathilde Villeneuve, and Jason Waite.

    The members of Cluster are: CAC Brétigny, Brétigny-sur-Orge; Casco – Office for Art, Design and Theory, Utrecht; CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, Madrid; The Israeli Center for Digital Art, Holon; Les Laboratoires d'Aubervilliers, Paris; P74 Center and Gallery, Ljubljana; The Showroom, London; and Tensta konsthall, Stockholm.

    Contributors Can Altay, Ayreen Anastas and Rene Gabri, Ricardo Basbaum, Céline Condorelli, Cooperativa Crater Invertido, Mark Fisher and Nina Möntmann, Daniel Foucard, Rebecca Gordon-Nesbitt, Elaine W. Ho, Annette Krauss, Mattin, Andrea Phillips, Marion von Osten, Dimitrina Sevova, Simon Sheikh, Steven Ten Thije

    • Paperback $16.00
  • Circular Facts

    Circular Facts

    Mai Abu ElDahab, Binna Choi, and Emily Pethick

    Circular Facts is a collaborative endeavor between three European contemporary art organizations: Casco – Office for Art, Design and Theory, Utrecht; Objectif Exhibitions, Antwerp; and The Showroom, London, in partnership with Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen and Electric Palm Tree. The project acted as an informal think tank and a mutual support structure for the production and dissemination of artistic projects, and has culminated in an eponymous publication. The publication aims to gather a spectrum of perspectives to explore the roles of specific initiatives within their particular localities. The contributors have produced works that speak to their experiences within arts institutions, collaborative curatorial initiatives, and research networks, expanding on the relationship between institutions and artists, markets, local and international audiences, and current political climates.

    Contributors Mai Abu ElDahab, Binna Choi, Emily Pethick, Heejin Kim, Anthony Huberman, Will Bradley, Miren Jaio and Leire Veraga, Anna Colin and Melanie Boutaloup, and Gabi Ngcobo; and an interview with Kim Einarsson.

    • Paperback $19.95
  • Dave Hullfish Bailey

    Dave Hullfish Bailey

    What's Left

    Emily Pethick and Casco

    What's Left organizes research materials and speculative proposals relating to Bailey's project “What's left to its own devices (On reclamation)” for Casco, Office for Art, Design and Theory in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The book resists traditional categorization, but could be said to present a highly experimental geography which begins with the role of hydrological processes in creating specific spaces of sociability and private retreat. Through this lens, it cross-correlates the historic city of Utrecht and “Slab City”, an ad hoc squatters' camp in the California desert. The mixed narratives of individual freedom and communal living associated with the latter find structural echoes in the wharves of Utrecht. These privately colonized public spaces are unique in the world, and exist only through an almost accidental intersection: that of the city's topography (it is one of the few larger Dutch cities slightly above sea level) and the collective task of managing the regional system of canals to protect low-lying areas (the “water boards” responsible for this task are frequently cited as the first form of democratic political organization in Europe).

    Micro-sites in both places are further drawn together using non-linear heuristic methods to forge links across a range of subjects: The Rietveld Schröder House, history of the Colorado River and Imperial Irrigation District, sedimentation and accumulation, delta formation, water diversion structures, barricades as tools of spatial control, DIY culture, the social functions of books and libraries, etc. Additional essays by Emily Pethick, Jan Tumlir, and Lars Bang Larsen examine the project and contextualize it against Bailey's broader practice.

    Co-published by Casco

    • Paperback $29.95