Ernst R. Berndt

Ernst R. Berndt is Professor of Applied Economics at the Sloan School, MIT.

  • Modeling and Measuring Natural Resource Substitution

    Ernst R. Berndt and Barry C. Field

    The essays collected for the first time in this book provide evidence that economists are rising to the challenge, both in terms of anticipating the issues and developing appropriate methodologies for coping with them.

    A strategy of natural resource substitution is critical if the nation is to adapt successfully to the emerging reality of resource shortages. The essays collected for the first time in this book provide evidence that economists are rising to the challenge, both in terms of anticipating the issues and developing appropriate methodologies for coping with them.The authors' range of considerations here includes duality principles, flexible function forms, the effects of technical innovation, possible energy-capital and energy-labor trade-offs, static and dynamic modeling, and short-term and longterm analytical frameworks. A number of chapters deal with energy resources, while others study substitutions for agricultural resources, nonfuel minerals, and metals.An introductory chapter by the editors, outlines the analytical and empirical state of affairs in this subject area and places the eleven chapters which follow within this context. These are grouped into three major topics: Results from Recent Research on Resource Substitution and Technological Progress; Problems Arising from Recent Research; and Dynamic Models.

    Contributors Dale W. Jorgenson, Barbara M. Fraumeni, John R. Moroney, John M. Trapani, James M. Griffin, Heejoon Kang, Gardner M. Brown, David C. Stapleton, Richard G. Anderson, Raymond J. Kopp, V. Kerry Smith, J. R. Norsworthy, Michael J. Harper, Randall S. Brown, Laurits R. Christensen, M. Denny, M. Fuss, L. Waverman, Catherine J. Morrison, and G. Cambell Watkins

    • Hardcover $50.00

Contributor

  • Incentives and Choice in Health Care

    Incentives and Choice in Health Care

    Frank A. Sloan and Hirschel Kasper

    Leading scholars in the field of health economics evaluate the role of incentives in health and health-care decision making from the perspectives of both supply and demand.

    A vast body of empirical evidence has accumulated demonstrating that incentives affect health care choices made by both consumers and suppliers of health care services. Decisions in health care are affected by many types of incentives, such as the rate of return pharmaceutical manufacturers expect on their investments in research and development, or disincentives, such as increases in copayments patients must make when they visit physicians or are admitted to hospitals.

    In this volume, leading scholars in health economics review these new and important results and describe their own recent research assessing the role of incentives in health care markets and decisions people make that affect their personal health. The contexts include demand decisions—choices made by individuals about health care services they consume and the health insurance policies they purchase—and supply decisions made by medical students, practicing physicians, hospitals, and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Researchers and students of health economics and policy makers will find this book a valuable resource, both for learning economic concepts, particularly as they apply to health care, and for reading up-to-date summaries of the empirical evidence. General readers will find the book's chapters accessible, interesting, and useful for gaining an understanding of the likely effects of alternative health care policies.

    Contributors Henry J. Aaron, Ernst R. Berndt, John Cawley, Julie M. Donohue, Donna Gilleskie, Brian R. Golden, Gautam Gowrisankaran, Chee-Ruey Hsieh, Hirschel Kasper, Thomas G. McGuire, Joseph P. Newhouse, Sean Nicholson, Mark V. Pauly, Anna D. Sinaiko, Frank Sloan

    • Hardcover $15.75
    • Paperback $40.00