Owen R. Coté, Jr.

Owen Coté is Associate Director of the MIT Security Studies Program and Editor of the journal International Security.

  • Do Democracies Win Their Wars?

    Do Democracies Win Their Wars?

    An International Security Reader

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Important contributions from both sides of the debate over the relationship between democracy and military victory.

    In recent years, a new wave of scholarship has argued that democracies have unique advantages that enable them to compete vigorously in international politics. Challenging long-held beliefs—some of which go back to Thucydides' account of the clash between democratic Athens and authoritarian Sparta—that democracy is a liability in the harsh world of international affairs, many scholars now claim that democracies win most of their wars. This research suggests that democracies emerge victorious because they prudently choose to fight wars that they can win, and because they can marshal more resources, make better decisions, and muster public support for their military campaigns. Critics counter that democracy itself makes little difference in war and that other factors, such as overall power, determine whether a country tastes victory or defeat. In some cases, such as the Vietnam War, democracy may even have contributed to defeat.

    The book includes crucial contributions to the debate over democracy and military victory, presenting important theoretical, conceptual, and empirical arguments.

    • Paperback $30.00
  • Contending with Terrorism

    Contending with Terrorism

    Roots, Strategies, and Responses

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Experts explore the sources of contemporary terrorism, what terrorists want, and how the United States and other countries should respond.

    Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, scholars and policy analysts in national security have turned their attention to terrorism, considering not only how to prevent future attacks but also the roots of the problem. This book offers some of the latest research in terrorism studies. The contributors examine the sources of contemporary terrorism, discussing the impact of globalization, the influence of religious beliefs, and the increasing dissatisfaction felt by the world's powerless. They consider the strategies and motivations of terrorists, offering contending perspectives on whether or not terrorists can be said to achieve their goals; explore different responses to the threat of terrorism, discussing such topics as how the United States can work more effectively with its allies; and contemplate the future of al-Qaida, asking if its networked structure is an asset or a liability.

    The essays in Contending with Terrorism address some of the central topics in the analysis of contemporary terrorism. They promise to guide future policy and inspire further research into one of most important security issues of the twenty-first century.

    Contributors Max Abrahms, Daniel Byman, Erica Chenoweth, Audrey Kurth Cronin, Renée de Nevers, Mette Eilstrup-Sangiovanni, Hillel Frisch, Calvert Jones, Andrew Kydd, Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Elizabeth McClellan, Nicholas Miller, Assaf Moghadam, Michael Mousseau, Rysia Murphy, William Rose, Paul Staniland, Robert Trager, Barbara Walter, Dessislava Zagorcheva

    • Paperback $35.00
  • Going Nuclear

    Going Nuclear

    Nuclear Proliferation and International Security in the 21st Century

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    These essays offer conceptual, historical, and analytical perspectives on one of the most significant challenges to global security in the twenty-first century: controlling nuclear proliferation.

    The spread of nuclear weapons is one of the most significant challenges to global security in the twenty-first century. Limiting the proliferation of nuclear weapons and materials may be the key to preventing a nuclear war or a catastrophic act of nuclear terrorism. Going Nuclear offers conceptual, historical, and analytical perspectives on current problems in controlling nuclear proliferation. It includes essays that examine why countries seek nuclear weapons as well as studies of the nuclear programs of India, Pakistan, and South Africa. The final section of the book offers recommendations for responding to the major contemporary proliferation challenges: keeping nuclear weapons and materials out of the hands of terrorists, ensuring that countries that renounce nuclear weapons never change their minds, and cracking down on networks that illicitly spread nuclear technologies.

    Nearly all the chapters in this book have been previously published in the journal International Security. It contains a new preface and one chapter commissioned specifically for the volume, Matthew Bunn's "Nuclear Terrorism: A Strategy for Prevention."

    Contributors Samina Ahmed, Chaim Braun, Matthew Bunn, Christopher F. Chyba, Matthew Fuhrmann, Šumit Ganguly, S. Paul Kapur, Ariel E. Levite, Peter Liberman, Austin Long, Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Alexander H. Montgomery, Gaukhar Mukhatzhanova, William C. Potter, Whitney Raas, Scott D. Sagan, Etel Solingen

    • Paperback $35.00
  • Primacy and Its Discontents

    Primacy and Its Discontents

    American Power and International Stability

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Experts consider whether American primacy will endure or if the future holds a multipolar world of several great powers.

    The unprecedented military, economic, and political power of the United States has led some observers to declare that we live in a unipolar world in which America enjoys primacy or even hegemony. At the same time public opinion polls abroad reveal high levels of anti-Americanism, and many foreign governments criticize U.S. policies. Primacy and Its Discontents explores the sources of American primacy, including the uses of U.S. military power, and the likely duration of unipolarity. It offers theoretical arguments for why the rest of the world will—or will not—align against the United States. Several chapters argue that the United States is not immune to the long-standing tendency of states to balance against power, while others contend that wise U.S. policies, the growing role of international institutions, and the spread of liberal democracy can limit anti-American balancing. The final chapters debate whether countries are already engaging in "soft balancing" against the United States. The contributors offer alternative prescriptions for U.S. foreign policy, ranging from vigorous efforts to maintain American primacy to acceptance of a multipolar world of several great powers.

    Contributors Gerard Alexander, Stephen Brooks, John G. Ikenberry, Christopher Layne, Keir Lieber, John Owen IV, Robert Pape, T. V. Paul, Barry Posen, Kenneth Waltz, William Wohlforth

    • Paperback $30.00
  • Offense, Defense, and War

    Offense, Defense, and War

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    An overview of offense-defense theory, which argues that the relative ease of offense and defense varies in international politics.

    Offense-defense theory argues that the relative ease of offense and defense varies in international politics. When the offense has the advantage, military conquest becomes easier and war is more likely; the opposite is true when the defense has the advantage. The balance between offense and defense depends on geography, technology, and other factors. This theory, and the body of related theories, has generated much debate and research over the past twenty-five years.This book presents a comprehensive overview of offense-defense theory. It includes contending views on the theory and some of the most recent attempts to refine and test it.

    • Paperback $40.00
  • New Global Dangers

    New Global Dangers

    Changing Dimensions of International Security

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    An analysis of new global security concerns in the post-September 11 world, including weapons of mass destruction, nonmilitary dangers, and transnational actors.

    Despite growing concerns after September 11, 2001, over the global terrorist threat and the spread of weapons of mass destruction, international security no longer hinges only on arms control and the prevention of war. Nonmilitary concerns, including emerging infectious diseases, environmental degradation, demographic trends, and humanitarian catastrophes, also represent significant threats to global stability. In this book, leading analysts offer an overview of critical security dangers facing the world today.

    The book looks first at the relationship between weapons and security, discussing such aspects of proliferation as "nuclear entrepreneurship" in Russia and the threat of biological warfare. It then examines nonmilitary security concerns, including resource scarcity, migration, HIV/AIDS in Africa, and why humanitarian assistance sometimes does more harm than good. Finally, it looks at the role of transnational actors, including terrorist groups, nongovernmental organizations, and the privatized military industry.

    • Paperback $7.75
  • Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict, Revised Edition

    Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict, Revised Edition

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Understanding the roots and causes of ethnic animosity; analyses of recent events in Bosnia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Somalia, and the former Soviet Union.

    Most recent wars have been complex and bloody internal conflicts driven to a significant degree by nationalism and ethnic animosity. Since the end of the Cold War, dozens of wars—in Bosnia, Kosovo, Rwanda, Somalia, the former Soviet Union, and elsewhere—have killed or displaced millions of people. Understanding and controlling these wars has become one of the most important and frustrating tasks for scholars and political leaders.This revised and expanded edition of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict contains essays from some of the world's leading analysts of nationalism, ethnic conflict, and internal war. The essays from the first edition have been updated and supplemented by analyses of recent conflicts and new research on the resolution of ethnic and civil wars. The first part of the book addresses the roots of nationalistic and ethnic wars, focusing in particular on the former Yugoslavia. The second part assesses options for international action, including the use of force and the deployment of peacekeeping troops. The third part examines political challenges that often complicate attempts to prevent or end internal conflicts, including refugee flows and the special difficulties of resolving civil wars.

    • Paperback $40.00
  • The Rise of China

    The Rise of China

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Analysts debate the international implications of a newly powerful China.

    China's relentless economic growth in the 1980s and 1990s heralded its emergence as a great power in world politics. As its economy expanded, China seemed poised to become the second-largest economy in the world. At the same time, it modernized its military and adopted a more assertive diplomatic posture. Many observers have begun to debate the international implications of China's rise. Some analysts argue that China will inevitably pose a threat to peace and security in East Asia. A few even predict a new cold war between Beijing and Washington. Others claim that a powerful China can remain benign. None believes that China can be ignored. The essays in this volume assess China's emerging capabilities and intentions, debate the impact that China will have on security in the Asia-Pacific region, and propose polices for the United States to adopt in its relations with China.

    • Paperback $30.00
  • America's Strategic Choices, Revised Edition

    America's Strategic Choices, Revised Edition

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Contending perspectives on the future of US grand strategy.

    More than a decade has passed since the end of the Cold War, but the United States has yet to reach a consensus on a coherent approach to the international use of American power. The essays in this volume present contending perspectives on the future of U.S. grand strategy. U.S. policy options include primacy, cooperative security, selective engagement, and retrenchment. This revised edition includes additional and more recent analysis and advocacy of these options. The volume includes the Clinton administration's National Security Strategy for a New Century, the most recent official statement of American grand strategy, so readers can compare proposed strategies with the official U.S. government position.

    • Paperback $37.00
  • Rational Choice and Security Studies

    Rational Choice and Security Studies

    Stephen Walt and His Critics

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Opposing views on the merits of formal rational choice approaches as they have been applied to international security studies.

    Formal theories and rational choice methods have become increasingly prominent in most social sciences in the past few decades. Proponents of formal theoretical approaches argue that these methods are more scientific and sophisticated than other approaches, and that formal methods have already generated significant theoretical progress. As more and more social scientists adopt formal theoretical approaches, critics have argued that these methods are flawed and that they should not become dominant in most social-science disciplines. Rational Choice and Security Studies presents opposing views on the merits of formal rational choice approaches as they have been applied in the subfield of international security studies. This volume includes Stephen Walt's article "Rigor or Rigor Mortis? Rational Choice and Security Studies," critical replies from prominent political scientists, and Walt's rejoinder to his critics. Walt argues that formal approaches have not led to creative new theoretical explanations, that they lack empirical support, and that they have contributed little to the analysis of important contemporary security problems. In their replies, proponents of rational choice approaches emphasize that formal methods are essential for achieving theoretical consistency and precision.

    • Paperback $17.00
  • Theories of War and Peace

    Theories of War and Peace

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    New approaches to understanding war and peace in the changing international system.

    What causes war? How can wars be prevented? Scholars and policymakers have sought the answers to these questions for centuries. Although wars continue to occur, recent scholarship has made progress toward developing more sophisticated and perhaps more useful theories on the causes and prevention of war. This volume includes essays by leading scholars on contemporary approaches to understanding war and peace. The essays include expositions, analyses, and critiques of some of the more prominent and enduring explanations of war. Several authors discuss realist theories of war, which focus on the distribution of power and the potential for offensive war. Others examine the prominent hypothesis that the spread of democracy will usher in an era of peace. In light of the apparent increase in nationalism and ethnic conflict, several authors present hypotheses on how nationalism causes war and how such wars can be controlled. Contributors also engage in a vigorous debate on whether international institutions can promote peace. In a section on war and peace in the changing international system, several authors consider whether rising levels of international economic independence and environmental scarcity will influence the likelihood of war.

    • Paperback $50.00
  • Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict

    Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict

    Michael E. Brown, Owen R. Coté, Jr., Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Addresses the roots of nationalist and ethnic wars and explores options for preventing and resolving such conflicts.

    Most of the wars of the 1990s have been complex and bloody internal conflicts driven to a significant degree by nationalism and ethnic animosity. Dozens of wars—in Bosnia, Rwanda, Somalia, the former Soviet Union, and elsewhere—have killed or displaced millions of people. Scholars and diplomats have been frustrated in their attempts to understand and control these wars. The first part of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict addresses the roots of nationalist and ethnic wars, focusing in particular on the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, the former Soviet Union, and Kashmir. The second part of the book, which explores options for preventing and resolving such conflicts, develops proposals for international action ranging from military intervention to partition to a reconsideration of the idea of the state in Africa.

    • Paperback $25.00
  • Avoiding Nuclear Anarchy

    Avoiding Nuclear Anarchy

    Containing the Threat of Loose Russian Nuclear Weapons and Fissile Material

    Owen R. Coté, Jr., Graham Allison, Steven E. Miller, and Richard A Falkenrath

    This study by Graham Allison and three colleagues at Harvard's Center for Science and International Affairs warns that containing the leakage of nuclear materials—and keeping them out of the hands of groups hostile to the United States—is our nation's highest security priority.

    What if the bomb that exploded in Oklahoma City or New York's World Trade Center had used 100 pounds of highly enriched uranium? The destruction would have been far more vast. This danger is not so remote: the recipe for making such a bomb is simple, and soon the ingredients might be easily attained. Thousands of nuclear weapons and hundreds of tons of weapons-grade uranium and plutonium from the weapons complex of the former Soviet Union, poorly guarded and poorly accounted for, could soon leak on to a vast emerging nuclear black market.This study by Graham Allison and three colleagues at Harvard's Center for Science and International Affairs warns that containing the leakage of nuclear materials—and keeping them out of the hands of groups hostile to the United States—is our nation's highest security priority. As the most open society on a shrinking planet, the United States has no reliable defense against smuggled weapons fashioned from black-market materials by a determined state or terrorist group. Avoiding Nuclear Anarchy highlights the fact that the only way to combat the threat is by preventing nuclear leakage in the first place. Its message is both timely and urgent: it outlines the new nuclear danger and details how to reshape U.S. national security policy to deal with these dangers.

    • Paperback $30.00

Contributor

  • Blockheads!

    Blockheads!

    Essays on Ned Block's Philosophy of Mind and Consciousness

    Adam Pautz and Daniel Stoljar

    New essays on the philosophy of Ned Block, with substantive and wide-ranging responses by Block.

    Perhaps more than any other philosopher of mind, Ned Block synthesizes philosophical and scientific approaches to the mind; he is unique in moving back and forth across this divide, doing so with creativity and intensity. Over the course of his career, Block has made groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of intelligence, representation, and consciousness. Blockheads! (the title refers to Block's imaginary counterexample to the Turing test—and to the Block-enthusiast contributors) offers eighteen new essays on Block's work along with substantive and wide-ranging replies by Block. The essays and responses not only address Block's past contributions but are rich with new ideas and argument. They importantly clarify many key elements of Block's work, including his pessimism concerning such thought experiments as Commander Data and the Nation of China; his more general pessimism about intuitions and introspection in the philosophy of mind; the empirical case for an antifunctionalist, biological theory of phenomenal consciousness; the fading qualia problem for a biological theory; the link between phenomenal consciousness and representation (especially spatial representation); and the reducibility of phenomenal representation. Many of the contributors to Blockheads! are prominent philosophers themselves, including Tyler Burge, David Chalmers, Frank Jackson, and Hilary Putnam.

    Contributors Ned Block, Bill Brewer, Richard Brown, Tyler Burge, Marisa Carrasco, David Chalmers, Frank Jackson, Hakwan Lau, Geoffrey Lee, Janet Levin, Joseph Levine, William G. Lycan, Brian P. McLaughlin, Adam Pautz, Hilary Putnam, Sydney Shoemaker, Susanna Siegel, Nicholas Silins, Daniel Stoljar, Michael Tye, Sebastian Watzl

    • Hardcover $90.00
  • The Embodied Mind, Revised Edition

    The Embodied Mind, Revised Edition

    Cognitive Science and Human Experience

    Francisco J. Varela, Evan Thompson, and Eleanor Rosch

    A new edition of a classic work that originated the “embodied cognition” movement and was one of the first to link science and Buddhist practices.

    This classic book, first published in 1991, was one of the first to propose the “embodied cognition” approach in cognitive science. It pioneered the connections between phenomenology and science and between Buddhist practices and science—claims that have since become highly influential. Through this cross-fertilization of disparate fields of study, The Embodied Mind introduced a new form of cognitive science called “enaction,” in which both the environment and first person experience are aspects of embodiment. However, enactive embodiment is not the grasping of an independent, outside world by a brain, a mind, or a self; rather it is the bringing forth of an interdependent world in and through embodied action. Although enacted cognition lacks an absolute foundation, the book shows how that does not lead to either experiential or philosophical nihilism. Above all, the book's arguments were powered by the conviction that the sciences of mind must encompass lived human experience and the possibilities for transformation inherent in human experience.

    This revised edition includes substantive introductions by Evan Thompson and Eleanor Rosch that clarify central arguments of the work and discuss and evaluate subsequent research that has expanded on the themes of the book, including the renewed theoretical and practical interest in Buddhism and mindfulness. A preface by Jon Kabat-Zinn, the originator of the mindfulness-based stress reduction program, contextualizes the book and describes its influence on his life and work.

    • Paperback $30.00
  • Consciousness Revisited

    Consciousness Revisited

    Materialism without Phenomenal Concepts

    Michael Tye

    Four major puzzles of consciousness philosophical materialism must confront after rejecting the phenomenal concept strategy.

    We are material beings in a material world, but we are also beings who have experiences and feelings. How can these subjective states be just a matter of matter? To defend materialism, philosophical materialists have formulated what is sometimes called "the phenomenal-concept strategy," which holds that we possess a range of special concepts for classifying the subjective aspects of our experiences. In Consciousness Revisited, the philosopher Michael Tye, until now a proponent of the the phenomenal-concept strategy, argues that the strategy is mistaken.

    A rejection of phenomenal concepts leaves the materialist with the task of finding some other strategy for defending materialism. Tye points to four major puzzles of consciousness that arise: How is it possible for Mary, in the famous thought experiment, to make a discovery when she leaves her black-and-white room? In what does the explanatory gap consist and how can it be bridged? How can the hard problem of consciousness be solved? How are zombies possible? Tye presents solutions to these puzzles—solutions that relieve the pressure on the materialist created by the failure of the phenomenal-concept strategy. In doing so, he discusses and makes new proposals on a wide range of issues, including the nature of perceptual content, the conditions necessary for consciousness of a given object, the proper understanding of change blindness, the nature of phenomenal character and our awareness of it, whether we have privileged access to our own experiences, and, if we do, in what such access consists.

    • Hardcover $8.75
    • Paperback $25.00
  • Foundational Issues in Linguistic Theory

    Foundational Issues in Linguistic Theory

    Essays in Honor of Jean-Roger Vergnaud

    Robert Freidin, Carlos P. Otero, and Maria Luisa Zubizarreta

    Essays by leading theoretical linguists—including Noam Chomsky, B. Elan Dresher, Richard Kayne, Howard Lasnik, Morris Halle, Norbert Hornstein, Henk van Riemsdijk, and Edwin Williams—reflect on Jean-Roger Vergnaud's influence in the field and discuss current theoretical issues

    Jean-Roger Vergnaud's work on the foundational issues in linguistics has proved influential over the past three decades. At MIT in 1974, Vergnaud (now holder of the Andrew W. Mellon Professorship in Humanities at the University of Southern California) made a proposal in his Ph.D. thesis that has since become, in somewhat modified form, the standard analysis for the derivation of relative clauses. Vergnaud later integrated the proposal within a broader theory of movement and abstract case. These topics have remained central to theoretical linguistics. In this volume, essays by leading theoretical linguists attest to the importance of Jean-Roger Vergnaud's contributions to linguistics. The essays first discuss issues in syntax, documenting important breakthroughs in the development of the principles and parameters framework and including a famous letter (unpublished until recently) from Vergnaud to Noam Chomsky and Howard Lasnik commenting on the first draft of their 1977 paper “Filters and Controls.” Vergnaud's writings on phonology (which, the editors write, “take a definite syntactic turn”) have also been influential, and the volume concludes with two contributions to that field. The essays, rewarding from both theoretical and empirical perspectives, not only offer insight into Vergnaud's impact on the field but also describe current work on the issues he introduced into the scholarly debate.

    Contributors Joseph Aoun, Elabbas Benmamoun, Cedric Boeckx, Noam Chomsky, B. Elan Dresher, Robert Freidin, Morris Halle, Norbert Hornstein, Richard S. Kayne, Samuel Jay Keyser, Howard Lasnik, Yen-hui Audrey Li, M. Rita Manzini, Karine Megerdoomian, David Michaels, Henk van Riemsdijk, Alain Rouveret, Leonardo M. Savoia, Jean-Roger Vergnaud, Edwin Williams

    • Hardcover $75.00
    • Paperback $40.00
  • Consciousness and Persons

    Consciousness and Persons

    Unity and Identity

    Michael Tye

    In Consciousness and Persons: Unity and Identity, Michael Tye takes on the thorny issue of the unity of consciousness and answers these important questions: What exactly is the unity of consciousness? Can a single person have a divided consciousness? What is a single person? Tye argues that unity is a fundamental part of human consciousness—something so basic to everyday experience that it is easy to overlook. For example, when we hear the sound of waves crashing on a beach and at the same time see a red warning flag, there is an overall unity to our experience; the sound and the red shape are presented together in our consciousness. Similarly, when we undergo a succession of thoughts as we think something through, there is an experience of succession that unifies the thoughts into a conscious whole. But, Tye shows, consciousness is not always unified. Split-brain subjects, whose corpus callosum has been severed, are usually taken to have a divided or disunified consciousness. Their behavior in certain situations implies that they have lost the unity normal human subjects take for granted; it is sometimes even supposed that a split-brain subject is really two persons. Tye begins his account by proposing an account of the unity of experience at a single time; this account is extended over the succeeding chapters to cover bodily sensations at a single time and perceptual experience, bodily sensations, conscious thoughts, and felt moods at a single time. Tye follows these chapters with a discussion of the unity of experience through time. Turning to the split-brain phenomenon, he proposes an account of the mental life of split-brain subjects and argues that certain facts about these subjects offer support for his theory of unity. Finally, addressing the topic of the nature of persons and personal identity, Tye finds the two great historical accounts—the ego theory and the bundle theory—lacking and he makes an alternative proposal. He includes an appendix on the general representational approach to consciousness and its many varieties, because of the relevance of representationalism to the theory of unity being adanced.

    • Hardcover $42.00
    • Paperback $25.00
  • Inequality and Growth

    Inequality and Growth

    Theory and Policy Implications

    Theo S. Eicher and Stephen J. Turnovsky

    Even minute increases in a country's growth rate can result in dramatic changes in living standards over just one generation. The benefits of growth, however, may not be shared equally. Some may gain less than others, and a fraction of the population may actually be disadvantaged. Recent economic research has found both positive and negative relationships between growth and inequality across nations. The questions raised by these results include: What is the impact on inequality of policies designed to foster growth? Does inequality by itself facilitate or detract from economic growth, and does it amplify or diminish policy effectiveness? This book provides a forum for economists to examine the theoretical, empirical, and policy issues involved in the relationship between growth and inequality. The aim is to develop a framework for determining the role of public policy in enhancing both growth and equality. The diverse range of topics, examined in both developed and developing countries, includes natural resources, taxation, fertility, redistribution, technological change, transition, labor markets, and education. A theme common to all the essays is the importance of education in reducing inequality and increasing growth.

    • Hardcover $8.75
    • Paperback $20.00
  • Workbook for Methods of Macroeconomic Dynamics, Second Edition

    Workbook for Methods of Macroeconomic Dynamics, Second Edition

    Stephen J. Turnovsky, Santanu Chatterjee, and Michael Hendrickson

    This workbook accompanies the second edition of Stephen Turnovsky's Methods of Macroeconomic Dynamics.

    This workbook accompanies the second edition of Stephen Turnovsky's Methods of Macroeconomic Dynamics. New problems have been added to most of the chapters, particularly those that are new to the second edition of the book. In general, those exercises near the beginning of the book and the first few exercises of each chapter are the easiest to solve.

    • Paperback $22.00
  • Consciousness, Color, and Content

    Consciousness, Color, and Content

    Michael Tye

    Experiences and feelings are inherently conscious states. There is something it is like to feel pain, to have an itch, to experience bright red. Philosophers call this sort of consciousness "phenomenal consciousness." Even though phenomenal consciousness seems to be a relatively primitive matter, something more widespread in nature than higher-order or reflective consciousness, it is deeply puzzling.

    In 1995 Michael Tye proposed a theory of phenomenal consciousness now known as representationalism. This book is, in part, devoted to a further development of that theory along with replies to common objections. Tye's focus is broader than representationalism, however. Two prominent challenges for any reductive theory of consciousness are the explanatory gap and the knowledge argument. In part I of this book, Tye suggests that these challenges are intimately related. The best strategy for dealing with the explanatory gap, he claims, is to consider it a kind of cognitive illusion. Part II of the book is devoted to representationalism. Part III connects representationalism with two more general issues. The first is the nature of color. Tye defends a commonsense, objectivist view of color and argues that such a view is compatible with modern color science. In the final chapter, Tye addresses the question of where on the phylogenetic scale phenomenal consciousness ceases, arguing that consciousness extends beyond the realm of vertebrates to such relatively simple creatures as the honeybee.

    • Hardcover $11.75
    • Paperback $20.00
  • Methods of Macroeconomic Dynamics, Second Edition

    Methods of Macroeconomic Dynamics, Second Edition

    Stephen J. Turnovsky

    Just as macroeconomic models describe the overall economy within a changing, or dynamic, framework, the models themselves change over time. In this text Stephen J. Turnovsky reviews in depth several early models as well as a representation of more recent models. They include traditional (backward-looking) models, linear rational expectations (future-looking) models, intertemporal optimization models, endogenous growth models, and continuous time stochastic models. The author uses examples from both closed and open economies. Whereas others commonly introduce models in a closed context, tacking on a brief discussion of the model in an open economy, Turnovsky integrates the two perspectives throughout to reflect the increasingly international outlook of the field. This new edition has been extensively revised. It contains a new chapter on optimal monetary and fiscal policy, and the coverage of growth theory has been expanded substantially. The range of growth models considered has been extended, with particular attention devoted to transitional dynamics and nonscale growth. The book includes cutting-edge research and unpublished data, including much of the author's own work.

    • Hardcover $80.00
  • International Macroeconomic Dynamics

    International Macroeconomic Dynamics

    Stephen J. Turnovsky

    International Macroeconomic Dynamics provides extensive applications of important macroeconomic dynamic models to the international economy.

    For a long time, the study of macroeconomics has focused almost exclusively on a closed economy and downplayed the role of international transactions. Today, however, researchers recognize that one cannot fully understand domestic macroeconomic relationships without considering the global economy within which each country operates. Increasingly, economists are treating international transactions as an integral part of the macroeconomic system, and international macroeconomics has become an area of intensive research activity. International Macroeconomic Dynamics provides extensive applications of important macroeconomic dynamic models to the international economy. It adopts the main contemporary macroeconomic framework, the representative agent model, and develops a series of models of increasing complexity. The author considers both small and large economies and analyzes them in both deterministic and stochastic contexts. The emphasis is very much on the development of the analytical models; a novel feature is the extensive use of continuous-time stochastic methods. While the author applies the models to a range of important policy issues, particularly issues of fiscal policy, the reader is invited to view the analyses as blueprints for other applications.

    • Hardcover $15.75
  • America's Strategic Choices

    America's Strategic Choices

    Michael E. Brown

    Contending perspectives on the future of US grand strategy.

    Almost a decade has passed since the end of the Cold War, but the United States has yet to reach a consensus on a coherent approach to the international use of American power. The essays in this volume present contending perspectives on the future of US strategy. Options for US policy include primacy, cooperative security, selective engagement, and retrenchment. The volume includes the Clinton administration's National Security Strategy of Engagement and Enlargement so readers can compare proposed strategies with the official US government position.

    • Paperback $19.50
  • East Asian Security

    East Asian Security

    Michael E. Brown, Steven E. Miller, and Sean M. Lynn-Jones

    The implications of the rapid growth of East Asian countries in the post-Cold War world.

    The future of East Asian security has become a critically important topic in the post-Cold War world. Virtually all of the Asia-Pacific countries are enjoying rapid economic growth, but many remain wary of their neighbors. Unlike every other region of the world, East Asia's military spending continues to accelerate. East Asian Security addresses some of the most important strategic questions about the future of the region.

    • Paperback $35.00
  • Debating the Democratic Peace

    Debating the Democratic Peace

    Michael E. Brown, Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Are democracies less likely to go to war than other kinds of states? This question is of tremendous importance in both academic and policy-making circles and one that has been debated by political scientists for years. The Clinton administration, in particular, has argued that the United States should endeavor to promote democracy around the world. This timely reader includes some of the most influential articles in the debate that have appeared in the journal International Security during the past two years, adding two seminal pieces published elsewhere to make a more balanced and complete collection, suitable for classroom use.

    • Paperback $45.00
  • Ten Problems of Consciousness

    Ten Problems of Consciousness

    A Representational Theory of the Phenomenal Mind

    Michael Tye

    Can neurophysiology ever reveal to us what it is like to smell a skunk or to experience pain? In what does the feeling of happiness consist? How is it that changes in the white and gray matter composing our brains generate subjective sensations and feelings? These are several of the questions that Michael Tye addresses, while formulating a new and enlightening theory about the phenomenal "what it feels like" aspect of consciousness. The test of any such theory, according to Tye, lies in how well it handles ten critical problems of consciousness.

    Tye argues that all experiences and all feelings represent things, and that their phenomenal aspects are to be understood in terms of what they represent. He develops this representational approach to consciousness in detail with great ingenuity and originality. In the book's first part Tye lays out the domain, the ten problems and an associated paradox, along with all the theories currently available and the difficulties they face. In part two, he develops his intentionalist approach to consciousness. Special summaries are provided in boxes and the ten problems are illustrated with cartoons.

    A Bradford Book

    Representation and Mind series

    • Hardcover $50.00
    • Paperback $30.00
  • Global Dangers

    Global Dangers

    Changing Dimensions of International Security

    Sean M. Lynn-Jones and Steven E. Miller

    The essays collected in Global Dangers provide both conceptual analysis and empirical assessment of the environment, migration, and nationalism as sources of conflict. The East-West confrontation that dominated the international security agenda during the Cold War has largely receded from view. Revealed in its wake is a different set of dangers, not really new but previously overshadowed by Cold War preoccupations. Global Dangers examines three such potential threats to peace: environmental problems, including access to scarce resources and population pressures; international migration; and nationalism. These issues are global in scope, persistent in nature, and potent in their implications. It is tragically clear that they can give rise to political dispute and to violent conflict.

    Contributors V. P. Gagnon, Peter H. Gleick, Thomas F. Homer-Dixon, F. Stephen Larrabee, Miriam R. Lowi, Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Steven E. Miller, Barry R. Posen, Richard H. Ullman, Stephen Van Evera, Myron Weiner

    • Paperback $30.00
  • Perils of Anarchy

    Perils of Anarchy

    Contemporary Realism and International Security

    Michael E. Brown, Sean M. Lynn-Jones, and Steven E. Miller

    Current debates about the nature of international politics have centered on the clash between supporters and critics of realism. The Perils of Anarchy brings together a number of recent essays written in the realist tradition. It includes realist interpretations of the collapse of the Cold War order and of the emerging order that has replaced it, the sources of alignment and aggression, and the causes of peace. A final section provides a counterpoint by raising criticisms of and alternatives to the realist approach.

    Contributors Charles L. Glaser, Christopher Layne, Peter Liberman, Lisa L. Martin, John J. Mearsheimer, Paul Schroeder, Randall Schweller, Stephen M. Walt, Kenneth N. Waltz, William C. Wohlforth, Fareed Zakaria. An International Security Reader

    • Paperback $40.00
  • The Cold War and After, Expanded Edition

    The Cold War and After, Expanded Edition

    Prospects for Peace

    Sean M. Lynn-Jones and Steven E. Miller

    A collection of well-reasoned arguments on the causes of the Cold War and the effect of its aftermath on the peaceful coexistence of European states.

    The Cold War and After presents a collection of well-reasoned arguments selected from the journal International Security on the causes of the Cold War and the effect of its aftermath on the peaceful coexistence of European states. This new edition includes all of the material from the first edition, plus four new articles: The Unipolar Illusion: Why New Great Powers Will Rise, Christopher Layne; International Primacy: Is the Game Worth the Candle? Robert Jervis; Why International Primacy Matters, Samuel P. Huntington; and International Relations Theory and the End of the Cold War, John Lewis Gaddis.

    • Paperback $40.00
  • America's Strategy in a Changing World

    America's Strategy in a Changing World

    Sean M. Lynn-Jones and Steven E. Miller

    Up-to-date and comprehensive analyses of American national security strategy in the post-Cold War world.

    At a time when events are overtaking many publications, these articles selected from International Security provide up-to-date and comprehensive analyses of American national security strategy in the post-Cold War world. Addressing future U.S. relations with its Cold War allies as well as with its former foes, contributions take up such major issues as overall strategic options, security in the new Europe, relations with the former Soviet Union, U.S.-Japan relations, and threats in the Third World, particularly proliferation. Essays in the first section examine the broad options that the United States has now that it no longer confronts a Soviet threat. They discuss such questions as what threats the United States now confronts, what values and interests it should pursue, whether it should play a diminished role in world politics, and what lessons can be drawn from the past. Essays in the second section look at important dimensions of U.S. strategy, including assuring security in Europe, relations with the former Soviet Union, and U.S. interests in the Third World. With its explicit focus on what course the United States should pursue in the post-Cold War world, America's Strategy in a Changing World serves as a companion volume to The Cold War and After, which drew on important theories in international relations to explain and predict the pattern of world politics.

    • Paperback $6.75
  • Toward a Practice of Autonomous Systems

    Toward a Practice of Autonomous Systems

    Proceedings of the First European Conference on Artificial Life

    Francisco J. Varela and Paul Bourgine

    Artificial life embodies a recent and important conceptual step in modem science: asserting that the core of intelligence and cognitive abilities is the same as the capacity for living. The recent surge of interest in artificial life has pushed a whole range of engineering traditions, such as control theory and robotics, beyond classical notions of goal and planning into biologically inspired notions of viability and adaptation, situatedness and operational closure. These proceedings serve two important functions: they address bottom-up theories of artificial intelligence and explore what can be learned from simple models such as insects about the cognitive processes and characteristic autonomy of living organisms, while also engaging researchers and philosophers in an exciting examination of the epistemological basis of this new trend.

    Topics Artificial Animals • Genetic Algorithms • Autonomous Systems • Emergent Behaviors • Artificial Ecologies • Immunologic Algorithms • Self-Adapting Systems • Emergent Structures • Emotion And Motivation • Neural Networks • Coevolution • Fitness Landscapes

    Contributors H. Bersini, Domenico Parisi, Rodney A. Brooks, Christopher G. Langton, S. Kauffman, J.-L. Denenbourg, Pattie Maes, John Holland, T. Smithersm H. Swefel, H. Muhlenbein

    • Paperback $80.00
  • The Imagery Debate

    The Imagery Debate

    Michael Tye

    Michael Tye untangles the complex web of empirical and conceptual issues of the newly revived imagery debate in psychology between those that liken mental images to pictures and those that liken them to linguistic descriptions. He also takes into account longstanding philosophical issues, to arrive at a comprehensive, up-to-date view and an original theory that provides answers to questions raised in both psychology and philosophy. Drawing on the insights of Stephen Kosslyn and the work on vision of David Mart, Tye develops a new theory of mental imagery that includes an account of imagistic representation and also tackles questions about the phenomenal qualities of mental images, image indeterminacy, the neurophysiolgical basis of imagery, and the causal relevance of image content to behavior. Tye introduces the history of philosophical views on the nature of mental imagery from Aristotle to Kant. He examines the reasons for the decline of picture theories of imagery and the use of alternative theories, the reemergence of the picture theory (with special reference to the work of Stephen Kosslyn), and the contrasting view that mental images are inner linguistic descriptions rather than pictorial representations. He then proposes his own theory of images interpreted as symbol-filled arrays in part like pictures and in part like linguistic descriptions, addresses the issue of vagueness in some features of mental images, and argues that images need not have qualia to account for their phenomenological character. Tye concludes by discussing the questions of how images are physically realized in the brain and how the contents of images can be causally related to behavior.

    • Hardcover $26.00
    • Paperback $30.00
  • The Embodied Mind

    The Embodied Mind

    Cognitive Science and Human Experience

    Francisco J. Varela, Eleanor Rosch, and Evan Thompson

    The Embodied Mind provides a unique, sophisticated treatment of the spontaneous and reflective dimension of human experience. The authors argue that only by having a sense of common ground between mind in Science and mind in experience can our understanding of cognition be more complete. Toward that end, they develop a dialogue between cognitive science and Buddhist meditative psychology and situate it in relation to other traditions such as phenomenology and psychoanalysis.

    • Hardcover $25.00
    • Paperback $40.00
  • Nuclear Diplomacy and Crisis Management

    Nuclear Diplomacy and Crisis Management

    Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Steven E. Miller, and Stephen Van Evera

    These essays from the journal International Security examine the effects of the nuclear revolution on the international system and the role nuclear threats have played in international crises. The authors offer important new interpretations of the role of nuclear weapons in preventing a third world war, of the uses of atomic superiority, and of the effectiveness of nuclear threats.

    Contributors John Mueller, Robert Jervis, Richard K. Betts, Marc Trachtenberg, Roger Digman, Scott D. Sagan, Gordon Chang, H. W. Brands, Jr., Barry Blechman and Douglas Hart

    • Hardcover $36.00
    • Paperback $6.75
  • Mind Bugs

    Mind Bugs

    The Origins of Procedural Misconceptions

    Kurt VanLehn

    As children acquire arithmetic skills, they often develop "bugs" - small, local misconceptions that cause systematic errors.

    As children acquire arithmetic skills, they often develop "bugs" - small, local misconceptions that cause systematic errors. Mind Bugs combines a novel cognitive simulation process with careful hypothesis testing to explore how mathematics students acquire procedural skills in instructional settings, focusing in particular on these procedural misconceptions and what they reveal about the learning process. VanLehn develops a theory of learning that explains how students develop procedural misconceptions that cause systematic errors. He describes a computer program, "Sierra," that simulates learning processes and predicts exactly what types of procedural errors should occur. These predictions are tested with error data from several thousand subjects from schools all over the world. Moreover, each hypothesis of the theory is tested individually by determining how the predictions would change if it were removed from the theory. Integrating ideas from research in machine learning, artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, and linguistics, Mind Bugs specifically addresses error patterns on subtraction tests, showing, for example, why some students have an imperfect understanding of the rules for borrowing. Alternative explanatory hypotheses are explored by incorporating them in Sierra in place of the primary hypotheses, and seeing if the program still explains all the subtraction bugs that it explained before.

    Mind Bugs is included in the series Learning, Development, and Conceptual Change, edited by Lila Gleitman, Susan Carey, Elissa Newport, and Elizabeth Spelke. A Bradford Book

    • Hardcover $48.00
    • Paperback $30.00
  • The Age of Electronic Messages

    The Age of Electronic Messages

    John G. Truxal

    What are the frontiers of today's communications technology? The Age of Electronic Messages explains the scientific principles on which this technology is based and explores its capabilities and limitations, its risks and benefits. In straightforward language accompanied by numerous illustrations, Truxal describes the communications technology that has become such an integral part of today's work and leisure. He provides accounts of the bar codes used in supermarkets and the postal system of the way signals are described in terms of frequencies and in digital form of hearing and audio systems, of radio and navigation, of medical imaging, and of television broadcasting and narrowcasting. Unlike other books on the subject, The Age of Electronic Messages takes into account the sociology of the new communications technology as well as its mathematical and physical underpinnings.

    The Age of Electronic Messages is included in the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation sponsored series, the New Liberal Arts.

    • Hardcover $55.00
    • Paperback $55.00
  • Conventional Forces and American Defense Policy, Revised Edition

    An International Security Reader

    Steven E. Miller and Sean M. Lynn-Jones

    These fourteen essays analyze several major areas of American conventional defense: the new administration's defense policy the state of the NATO Warsaw Pact conventional balance, the effectiveness of NATO's conventional strategy and problems associated with projecting military power in the Third World. Over half of the chapters in this edition are new, and two others have been extensively revised and updated.

    Contributors Barry R. Posen, John Mearsheimer, Malcolm Chalmers, Lutz Unterseher, Eliot A. Cohen, John W. R. Lepingwell, Joshua Epstein, Richard K. Betts, Samuel P. Huntington, Robert D. Blackwill, and Jack Snyder

    • Hardcover $32.50
    • Paperback $14.95
  • Soviet Military Policy

    Soviet Military Policy

    An International Security Reader

    Sean M. Lynn-Jones, Steven E. Miller, and Stephen Van Evera

    Soviet military policy has been one of the most important and perplexing issues confronting the United States since 1945. Mikhail Gorbachev's foreign policy innovations have focused renewed attention on these vital questions. In this timely reader, ten experts on the Soviet Union offer their perspectives on Soviet military strategy and defense policy, covering the foreign policy context, nuclear weapons, conventional forces, and force and Soviet diplomacy.

    Contributors: Jack Snyder, Franklyn Griffiths, Stephen M. Meyer, Raymond L. Garthoff, Fritz W. Ermarth, Dimitri K. Simes, Donald MacKenzie, Matthew A Evangelista, and Richard Ned Lebow

    • Hardcover $32.50
    • Paperback $30.00
  • An Essay On Stress

    An Essay On Stress

    Morris Halle and Jean-Roger Vergnaud

    An Essay on Stress presents a universal theory for the characterization of the stress patterns of words and phrases encountered in the languages of the world. The heart of the theory is constituted by the formal mechanism for characterizing "action at a distance", which is a special case of the formalism needed for the construction of constituent structure.

    • Hardcover $35.00
    • Paperback $35.00
  • Digital Halftoning

    Digital Halftoning

    Robert Ulichney

    Digital Halftoning addresses the problem of developing algorithms that best match the specific parameters of any target display device. It is the first significant study of the process of producing quality images on practical computer displays.

    Along with text and graphics, images are fast becoming a generic data type for general-purpose computer systems. This poses new problems for the systems designer, who must be able to preprocess digital image data for a wide variety of video and hard copy displays. Digital halftoning, the method by which the illusion of continuous-tone images are created through the arrangement of binary picture elements, is a key component of any preprocessing. Digital Halftoning addresses the problem of developing algorithms that best match the specific parameters of any target display device. It is the first significant study of the process of producing quality images on practical computer displays. To aid the systems designer, Ulichney devises the concept of blue noise—which has many desirable properties for halftoning—and suggests efficient algorithms for its use. He also introduces new metrics for analyzing the frequency content of periodic and aperiodic patterns for both rectangular and hexagonal grids, and presents a unique "aspect ratio immunity" argument in favor of hexagonal grids. Included are several carefully selected digitally-produced images.

    • Hardcover $65.00
    • Paperback $25.00
  • Electric Energy Generation

    Economics, Reliability, and Rates

    Benjamin Avi -. Itzhak and Joseph Vardi

    Electric generating systems are so complex that the problems of devising analytical techniques and models that predict their actual behavior are enormous. But since the reliable and economic operation of such systems has become necessary to everyday life, it is imperative that those problems be solved. A host of diverse techniques—ranging from simple graphical devices to sophisticated simulation and mathematical programming models—have been developed. Each of these, however, is applicable only to certain classes of problems, not to the systemwide performance of power generation. The purpose of this book is to present a unified approach applicable to a whole range of systems-analysis needs in the electric energy generation field, an approach based on the recently developed equivalent load-duration curve (ELDC). The first seven chapters review traditional concepts and issues in the field, including reliability analysis and reserve planning, operating cost calculation, and rate structure analysis. The remaining seven chapters, which emphasize the random nature of electric generating systems, develop the ELDC approach and show its applicability to the full range of concepts and issues that have long engaged the attention of system designers and decisionmakers. This comprehensive and sophisticated treatment will interest electric utility managers and researchers, planners, and various federal commissions on utilities, as well as operations researchers, systems analysts, and energy economists.

    • Hardcover $39.95
  • Turkish Grammar

    Turkish Grammar

    Robert Underhill

    As the Mideast becomes more and more important in contemporary geopolitics, the study of that region's languages enjoys increasing popularity. Unfortunately, many language texts in this area are based on outdated usage and offer little information on how the language in question is actually spoken. Robert Underhill's Turkish Grammar closes this gap with a text that gives full coverage of syntax and usage as well as of traditional grammar and gives the student a thorough grounding in a truly useful vocabulary.

    Designed as a basic teaching grammar of Turkish for speakers, Turkish Grammar is suitable for classroom or individual use at the undergraduate or graduate level. Its extensive coverage of grammar and syntax makes it suitable also for use as a reference grammar. It incorporates not only systematized lessons and information about pronunciation, vocabulary, and syntax but also guidance in the area of usage and chapter-by-chapter exercises. Linguists will recognize that the author has used the framework of generative grammar in the organization and presentation of material; the text, however, avoids linguistic jargon and technical discussions so that students untrained in formal linguistics can use the book as easily as those who have had such training.

    • Hardcover $70.00
    • Paperback $35.00
  • Readings in the Modern Theory of Economic Growth

    Joseph E. Stiglitz and Hirofumi Uzawa

    The last two decades have been marked by an increasing concern with economic growth. Why do some countries grow faster than others? How can a country accelerate its economic growth? What are the effects of accelerated growth on the distribution of income? These are questions that economists have repeatedly been asked.

    The modern theory of economic growth has attempted to analyze the basic structure of the processes of economic growth. The lack of empirical information about many of the crucial aspects of growth models has led to a proliferation of assumptions as well as to a number of disputes that will be settled only when further empirical evidence becomes available. At the same time, however, growth theory has provided a conceptual framework within which much more meaningful empirical research can take place, and it has accordingly generated a vast amount of econometric research. While this volume is not concerned with the empirical aspects of the problem, the discussions reprinted here should point up the areas in which empirical research is badly needed. In addition, this collection of seminal papers will serve as a measure of the advances in growth theory itself over the past several decades.

    In Part I of this volume, the basic growth models of Harrod, Domar, Tobin, Solow, and Swan are presented. Most of the other articles in this book may be considered, in one way or another, as commentary on these basic papers. Part II focuses on the production function—in particular on the relationship among growth, capital, and technical change. Part III includes representatives of the Cambridge Growth and Distribution Theory. These differ from the neoclassical model presented earlier in several crucial ways, which the editors discuss in detail in their introduction to this section. Like Part II, Part IV is concerned with the nature of the production process. The focus here, however, is on the different production functions for the consumption and investment goods sectors.

    The last section of the book, Part V, differs from the earlier sections in one important respect: in the previous sections, the consumption function is specified as a behavioral rule. The central problem of this section, on the other hand, is how income should be allocated between investment and consumption. This serves, in a way, as a bridge between growth theory and planning. We are brought into the realm of welfare economics, of normative versus positive or descriptive economics.

    Some of the most notable of contemporary economists are represented in the volume.

    Contributors R. F. Harrod, Evsey D. Domar, James Tobin, R. M. Solow, T. W. Swan, J. R. Hicks, Joan Robinson, Hirofumi Uzawa, Wiliiam Fellner, Charles Kennedy, Edmund S. Phelps, R. C. O. Matthews, M. E. Yaari, Edward F. Denison, Kenneth J. Arrow, Leif Johansen, D. G. Champernowne, Lord Kahn, Nicholas Kaldor, James A. Mirrlees, F. P Ramsey, Paul A. Samuelson, and E. Malinvaud

    • Hardcover $25.00
    • Paperback $18.00