Frank van Harmelen

Frank van Harmelen is Professor in the Knowledge Representation and Reasoning Group of the Department of Computer Science at the VU University Amsterdam.

  • A Semantic Web Primer, Third Edition

    A Semantic Web Primer, Third Edition

    Grigoris Antoniou, Paul Groth, Frank van Harmelen, and Rinke Hoekstra

    A new edition of the widely used guide to the key ideas, languages, and technologies of the Semantic Web

    The development of the Semantic Web, with machine-readable content, has the potential to revolutionize the World Wide Web and its uses. A Semantic Web Primer provides an introduction and guide to this continuously evolving field, describing its key ideas, languages, and technologies. Suitable for use as a textbook or for independent study by professionals, it concentrates on undergraduate-level fundamental concepts and techniques that will enable readers to proceed with building applications on their own and includes exercises, project descriptions, and annotated references to relevant online materials.

    The third edition of this widely used text has been thoroughly updated, with significant new material that reflects a rapidly developing field. Treatment of the different languages (OWL2, rules) expands the coverage of RDF and OWL, defining the data model independently of XML and including coverage of N3/Turtle and RDFa. A chapter is devoted to OWL2, the new W3C standard. This edition also features additional coverage of the query language SPARQL, the rule language RIF and the possibility of interaction between rules and ontology languages and applications. The chapter on Semantic Web applications reflects the rapid developments of the past few years. A new chapter offers ideas for term projects. Additional material, including updates on the technological trends and research directions, can be found at http://www.semanticwebprimer.org.

  • A Semantic Web Primer, Second Edition

    A Semantic Web Primer, Second Edition

    Grigoris Antoniou and Frank van Harmelen

    The substantially updated second edition of a widely used guide to the key ideas, languages, and technologies of the Semantic Web, featuring additional coverage of new application areas, new tools, and other recent developments.

    The development of the Semantic Web, with machine-readable content, has the potential to revolutionize the World Wide Web and its use. A Semantic Web Primer provides an introduction and guide to this still emerging field, describing its key ideas, languages, and technologies. Suitable for use as a textbook or for self-study by professionals, it concentrates on undergraduate-level fundamental concepts and techniques that will enable readers to proceed with building applications on their own and includes exercises, project descriptions, and annotated references to relevant online materials. A Semantic Web Primer provides a systematic treatment of the different languages (XML, RDF, OWL, and rules) and technologies (explicit metadata, ontologies, and logic and inference) that are central to Semantic Web development as well as such crucial related topics as ontology engineering and application scenarios.

    This substantially revised and updated second edition reflects recent developments in the field, covering new application areas and tools. The new material includes a discussion of such topics as SPARQL as the RDF query language; OWL DLP and its interesting practical and theoretical properties; the SWRL language (in the chapter on rules); OWL-S (on which the discussion of Web services is now based). The new final chapter considers the state of the art of the field today, captures ongoing discussions, and outlines the most challenging issues facing the Semantic Web in the future.

    Supplementary materials, including slides, online versions of many of the code fragments in the book, and links to further reading, can be found at http://www.semanticwebprimer.org

  • A Semantic Web Primer

    A Semantic Web Primer

    Grigoris Antoniou and Frank van Harmelen

    A systematic description of ideas, languages, and technologies that are central to the development of the Semantic Web, for use as a textbook or guide to self-study.

    The development of the Semantic Web, with machine-readable content, has the potential to revolutionize the World Wide Web and its use. A Semantic Web Primer provides an introduction and guide to this emerging field, describing its key ideas, languages, and technologies. Suitable for use as a textbook or for self-study by professionals, it concentrates on undergraduate-level fundamental concepts and techniques that will enable readers to proceed with building applications on their own. It includes exercises, project descriptions, and annotated references to relevant online materials. A Semantic Web Primer is the only available book on the Semantic Web to include a systematic treatment of the different languages (XML, RDF, OWL, and rules) and technologies (explicit metadata, ontologies, and logic and inference) that are central to Semantic Web development. The book also examines such crucial related topics as ontology engineering and application scenarios.

    After an introductory chapter, topics covered in succeeding chapters include XML and related technologies that support semantic interoperability; RDF and RDF Schema, the standard data model for machine-process-able semantics; and OWL, the W3C-approved standard for a Web ontology language more extensive than RDF Schema; rules, both monotonic and nonmonotonic, in the framework of the Semantic Web; selected application domains and how the Semantic Web would benefit them; the development of ontology-based systems; and current debates on key issues and predictions for the future.

  • Logic-Based Knowledge Representation

    Peter M. Jackson, Johannes Reichgelt, and Frank van Harmelen

    This book explores the building of expert systems using logic for knowledge representation and meta-level inference for control. It presents research done by members of the expert systems group of the Department of Artificial Intelligence in Edinburgh, often in collaboration with others, based on two hypotheses: that logic is a suitable knowledge representation language, and that an explicit representation of the control regime of the theorem prover has many advantages.The editors introduce these hypotheses and present the arguments in their favor They then describe Socrates' a tool for the construction of expert systems that is based on these assumptions. They devote the remaining chapters to the solution of problems that arise from the restrictions imposed by Socrates's representation language and from the system's inefficiency.The chapters dealing with the representation problem present a reified approach to temporal logic that makes it possible to use nonstandard logics without extending the system, and describe a general proof method for arbitrary modal logics. Those dealing with the efficiency problem discuss the technique of partial evaluation and its limitations, as well as another possible solution known as assertion-time inference.

Contributor

  • At Your Service

    At Your Service

    Service-Oriented Computing from an EU Perspective

    Elisabetta Di Nitto, Anne-Marie Sassen, Paolo Traverso, and Arian Zwegers

    Research results from industry-academic collaborative projects in service-oriented computing describe practical, achievable solutions.

    Service-Oriented Applications and Architectures (SOAs) have captured the interest of industry as a way to support business-to-business interaction, and the SOA market grew by $4.9 billion in 2005. SOAs and in particular service-oriented computing (SOC) represent a promising approach in the development of adaptive distributed systems. With SOC, applications can open themselves to services offered by third parties and accessed through standard, well-defined interfaces. The binding between the applications and the services can be, in this context, extremely loose—enabling the ad hoc creation of new services when the need arises. This book offers an overview of some current research in the field, presenting the results of eighteen research projects funded by the European Community's Information Society Technologies Program (IST). The projects, collaborations between industry and academia, have produced practical, achievable results that point the way to real-world applications and future research. The chapters address such issues as requirement analysis, design, governance, interoperability, and the dependability of systems made up of components owned by third parties. The results are presented in the context of two roadmaps for research, one developed by European industry involved in software development and the other by researchers working in the service area. The contributors report first on the “Infrastructure Layer,” then (in the bulk of the book) on the “Service Integration Layer,” the “Semantic Layer,” and finally on the issues that cut across the different layers. The book concludes by looking at ongoing research on both roadmaps.

  • Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Theory and Evidence

    Marcel Fafchamps

    An analysis of recent data on the economic behavior of market institutions in sub-Saharan Africa, with implications for future research and current policy.

    In Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa, Marcel Fafchamps synthesizes the results of recent surveys of indigenous market institutions in twelve countries, including Benin, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, and Zimbabwe, and presents findings about economics exchange in Africa that have implications both for future research and current policy. Employing empirical data as well as theoretical models that clarify the data, Fafchamps takes as his unifying principle the difficulties of contract enforcement. Arguing that in an unpredictable world contracts are not always likely to be respected, he shows that contract agreements in sub-Saharan Africa are affected by the absence of large hierarchies (both corporate and governmental) and as a result must depend to a greater degree than in more developed economies on social networks and personal trust. Fafchamps considers policy recommendations as they apply to countries in three different stages of development: countries with undeveloped market institutions, like Ghana; countries at an intermediate stage, like Kenya; and countries with developed market institutions, like Zimbabwe.

    Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa caps ten years of personal research by the author. Fafchamps, in collaboration with such institutions as the Africa Division of the World Bank and the International Food Policy Research Institute, participated in the surveys of manufacturing firms and agricultural traders that provide the empirical basis for the book. The result is a work that makes a significant contribution to research on the continuing economic stagnation of many countries in sub-Saharan Africa and is also largely accessible to researchers in other fields and policy professionals.

  • Toward a Comparative Institutional Analysis

    Toward a Comparative Institutional Analysis

    Masahiko Aoki

    A conceptual and analytical framework for understanding economic institutions and institutional change.

    Markets are one of the most salient institutions produced by humans, and economists have traditionally analyzed the workings of the market mechanism. Recently, however, economists and others have begun to appreciate the many institution-related events and phenomena that have a significant impact on economic performance. Examples include the demise of the communist states, the emergence of Silicon Valley and e-commerce, the European currency unification, and the East Asian financial crises.

    In this book Masahiko Aoki uses modern game theory to develop a conceptual and analytical framework for understanding issues related to economic institutions. The wide-ranging discussion considers how institutions evolve, why their overall arrangements are robust and diverse across economies, and why they do or do not change in response to environmental factors such as technological progress, global market integration, and demographic change.

  • Transition and Economics

    Transition and Economics

    Politics, Markets, and Firms

    Gérard Roland

    The transition from socialism to capitalism in former socialist economies is one of the main economic events of the twentieth century. Not only does it affect the lives of approximately 1.65 billion people, but it is contributing to a shift in emphasis in economics from standard price and monetary theory to contracting and its institutional environment. Economic research in transition shows not only that institutions matter but also how their evolution toward higher efficiency depends on initial conditions and on sustained political support.Unlike early policy literature on transition economics, which focused on the so-called Washington consensus, this book provides an overview of current research, analyzing issues raised by transition for which economic theorists and policy makers had no ready answers. It shows how research on transition contributes to our understanding of capitalism as an economic system and of the dynamics of large-scale institutional change.The book is divided into three parts. The first part looks at how large-scale reforms are decided dynamically through the political process. The second part looks at the general equilibrium and macroeconomic effects of liberalization in economies without preexisting markets. The third part looks at the economic behavior of firms in the transition from state to private ownership and compares the effects of privatization, restructuring, and financial reform. Although focused on transition economics, the discussions are relevant to topics in political economics, development, public economics, corporate finance, and micro- and macroeconomics.

    • Hardcover $55.00
    • Paperback $34.00