Frankfurter Kunstverein

  • The Man Who Climbed Up the Stairs of Life and Found Out They Were Cinema Seats

    The Man Who Climbed Up the Stairs of Life and Found Out They Were Cinema Seats

    Keren Cytter, Beatrix Ruf, Kunsthalle Zürich, Nicolaus Schafhausen, and Frankfurter Kunstverein

    “Suddenly Hirst's head falls, with the neck and the coat. That is – Hirst's body falls over the bar. The straw penetrates his gullet through the nose and violently wakes the shrimp, the calamari, the salad, and the brandy in his stomach. He vomits it all on the bar, and they stream over the smooth brown wood. The gallerist gets up from his chair and goes over to Mr. Hirst. The barman hands him a nylon bag and helps him collect the animals and the juices, both modern and postmodern. He goes back to Jeff's table with an arrogant smile and says they can move. Then he lifts the bag that's dripping with small chunks of phlegm from the sides and says 'Tomorrow at Christie's.'”—Keren Cytter

    Written in seven chapters and seven styles, this book constitutes the first novel by the Israeli artist and filmmaker Keren Cytter (*1977). Both the grotesque and the absurd become tools to narrate the progression of her main character's life, artist Jeff Steinberg. With the recurring motif of scrambled reels, the story also functions as a reflection on the medium of film.

    Keren Cytter lives and works in Amsterdam and Berlin. She is a recipient of The Baloise Art Prize 2006 and has held solo exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam (2004), the Kunsthalle Zürich and Frankfurter Kunstverein (2005), and most recently at the Kunst-Werke in Berlin.

    • Paperback $24.95
  • Pecafil

    Pecafil

    Michael Beutler, Nicolaus Schafhausen, Katja Schroeder, and Frankfurter Kunstverein

    Pecafil is named after the bright yellow, biodegradable building material which Michael Beutler used for a series of outdoor sculptures in the city of Frankfurt am Main. At stake in most of the German artist's work is an experimental sculpture process where basic materials – wood, plaster, or glass – are used to analyze the standardization of common goods. His temporary, playful structures and forms constitute “a serious continuation of 20th century sculpture and architecture traditions and can function as almost pedagogical in relation to traditional public art. Seldom have attitudes from art history and the amateur carpenter been so interwoven”. Maria Lind

    This first monographic book discusses issues of art in public space and the social-political implications of Beutler's work.

    Contributors Thomas Bayrle, Maria Lind, Ariane Müller

    • Paperback $19.95
  • Marcel Odenbach

    Marcel Odenbach

    Blenden/Blinds

    Vanessa Joan Müller, Nicolaus Schafhausen, and Frankfurter Kunstverein

    According to author Kobena Mercer, “Odenbach's video art insists upon an attitude of openness towards uncertainty about the world. In this respect, his art criss-crosses the structural hybridization of video-based conceptualism with reflection on the lived experience of globalization.”

    Since the mid-1970s, Marcel Odenbach has produced an extensive body of tapes, performances, drawings and installations, and has gained international recognition as one of Germany's most important artists working in video. His works engage in a provocative discourse on the construction of the “self” in relation to historical and cultural representation. Using excerpts from films and newsreels, along with his own footage, the artist explores the ways images of the past shape our perception of the present. With its comprehensive illustrations and essays, including a text by the artist, this book features Odenbach's most important works.

    Contributors Dan Cameron, Jörg Heiser, Kobena Mercer, Vanessa Joan Müller, Marcel Odenbach, Astrid Wege

    • Paperback $14.95