Henry Tulkens

Henry Tulkens is Professor of Economics and Public Finance and a member of the Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) at Université Catholique de Louvain.

  • The Design of Climate Policy

    The Design of Climate Policy

    Roger Guesnerie and Henry Tulkens

    Leading economists offer theoretical, quantitative, and policy perspectives on climate policy.

    Debates over post-Kyoto Protocol climate change policy often take note of two issues: the feasibility and desirability of international cooperation on climate change policies, given the failure of the United States to ratify Kyoto, and the very limited involvement of developing countries; and the optimal timing of climate policies. These essays by leading international economists in this book offer insights on both these concerns.

    The book first considers the appropriate institutions for effective international cooperation on climate change, proposing an alternative to the Kyoto arrangement and a theoretical framework for such a scheme. The discussions then turn to the stability of international environmental agreements, emphasizing the logic of coalition forming (including the applicability of game-theoretical analysis). Finally, contributors address both practical and quantitative aspects of policy design, offering theoretical analyses of such specific policy issues as intertemporal aspects of carbon trade and the optimal implementation of a sequestration policy and then using formal mathematical models to examine policies related to the rate of climate change, international trade and carbon leakage, and the shortcomings of the standard Global Warming Potential index.

    Contributors Philippe Ambrosi, David F. Bradford, Barbara Buchner, Carlo Carraro, Parkash Chander, Stéphane De Cara, Damien Demailly, A. Denny Ellerman, Johan Eyckmans, Michael Finus, Elodie Galko, Roger Guesnerie, Jean-Charles Hourcade, Pierre-Alain Jayet, Gilles Lafforgue, Bernard Magné, Sandrine Mathy, Michel Moreaux, Sushama Murty, William A. Pizer, Philippe Quirion, Katrin Rehdanz, P. R. Shukla, Jaemin Song, Ian Sue Wing, Sylvie Thoron, Richard S. J. Tol, Henry Tulkens

    • Hardcover $8.75
    • Paperback $35.00
  • Contributions to Operations Research and Economics

    Bernard Cornet and Henry Tulkens

    These original contributions by leading economists in the decision sciences show how the interactions between these disciplines can enrich them all.

    These original contributions by leading economists in the decision sciences - operations research, game theory, econometrics, and mathematical economics - show how the interactions between these disciplines can enrich them all. In Part I, "Game Theory and Mathematical Economics," Robert Aumann illuminates the ideas that underlie a series of major contributions in game theory during the last two decades, and Paul Champsaur provides a synthesis on information exchange, incentives, and general equilibrium. Werner Hildenbrand retraces the evolution of mathematical economies, Bernard Cornet discusses the existence of equilibria under increasing returns, Roger Guesnerie writes on first-best allocation in economies with nonconvex production sets, and John Roberts expands recent work on nonmarket-clearing equilibria.

    In Part II, "Operations Research," Thomas Magnanti surveys twenty years of mathematical programming. John Mitchell and Michael Todd deal with the new interior point-methods in linear programming; Michael Ball, Wei-guo Liu, and William Pulleyblank analyze two terminal Steiner tree polyhedra, and Olivier Janssens de Bisthoven and Etienne Loute describe an algorithm and implementation of large-scale linear programs with special structures.

    In Part III, "Econometrics," Adrian Pagan surveys and evaluates the evolution of the field from 1966 to 1986. David Hendry and Jean-François Richard describe recent developments in the theory of encompassing, while Anton Barten proposes a levels version of the Rotterdam and related demand systems. Jean-Pierre Florens and Michel Mouchart address Bayesian specification tests, and Peter Kooinian examines a cross section of business survey reports to estimate average excess supply on goods and labor markets. Pierre Malgrange concludes with a method for analyzing the underlying theoretical structure of dynamic macroeconomic models.

    • Hardcover $55.00