Hito Steyerl

  • The Wretched of the Screen

    The Wretched of the Screen

    Hito Steyerl

    In Hito Steyerl's writing we begin to see how, even if the hopes and desires for coherent collective political projects have been displaced onto images and screens, it is precisely here that we must look frankly at the technology that seals them in. The Wretched of the Screen collects a number of Steyerl's landmark essays from recent years in which she has steadily developed her very own politics of the image. Twisting the politics of representation around the representation of politics, these essays uncover a rich trove of information in the formal shifts and aberrant distortions of accelerated capitalism, of the art system as a vast mine of labor extraction and passionate commitment, of occupation and internship, of structural and literal violence, enchantment and fun, of hysterical, uncontrollable flight through the wreckage of postcolonial and modernist discourses and their unanticipated openings.

    e-flux journal Series edited by Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle

    • Paperback $15.00

Contributor

  • Divided We Stand

    Divided We Stand

    9th Busan Biennale 2018

    Jörg Heiser, Cristina Ricupero, and Gahee Park

    Titled Divided We Stand, the 9th Busan Biennale in South Korea focused on the theme of divided or formerly territories created because of war, conflict, or colonization, and also considered individuals' feelings of separation, anxiety, fear, or paranoia that result from such geopolitical traumas. Featuring sixty-six artists and artist teams from thirty-four countries, the biennial was organized under the curatorial direction of Cristina Ricupero and Jörg Heiser, with the assistance of guest curator Gahee Park, and took place at the newly built Museum of Contemporary Art Busan (MoCA Busan) and the brutalist-style former Bank of Korea in Busan. The two venues reflected the biennial's theme: work shown at MOCA Busan examined past and current divisions left by the Cold War era, while the second venue comprised work that reflected on our current situation through the lens of science fiction.

    This comprehensive catalogue includes in-depth essays on the theme of the biennial from Boris Groys, Mohammed Hanif, Heonik Kwon, Nina Power, Hito Steyerl, and Wladimir Velminski, as well as individual artist pages and photographs from the exhibition.

    Participating artists: Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme, Bani Abidi, Chantal Akerman, Dora Longo Bahia, Maja Bajević, Khaled Barakeh, Yael Bartana, Jean-Luc Blanc, Oscar Chan Yik Long, Onejoon Che, Mina Cheon, Chin Cheng-Te, Sunah Choi, Phil Collins, Christoph Dettmeier, Dias and Riedweg, Smadar Dreyfus, Eva Grubinger, Joana Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige, Ramin and Rokni Haerizadeh and Hesam Rahmanian, Flaka Haliti, Andy Hope 1930, Hsu Chia-Wei, Im Youngzoo, Joo Hwang, Yunsun Jung, Nikita Kadan, Wanuri Kahiu, Amar Kanwar, Kiluanji Kia Henda, Hayoun Kwon, Oliver Laric, Minwhee Lee & Yun Choi, Gabriel Lester and Jonas Lund, Minouk Lim, Laura Lima and Zé Carlos Garcia, Lin + Lam, Liu Ding, Dora Longo Bahia, Marko Lulić, Fabian Marti, Truwant + Rodet and Eun Kyung Park, Augustin Maurs, Metahaven, Nástio Mosquito, Henrike Naumann, Marcel Odenbach, Melik Ohanian, Ferhat Özgür, Kelvin Kyung Kun Park, Susan Philipsz, Adrian Piper, Min Jeong Seo, Bruno Serralongue, Tayfun Serttas, Hito Steyerl, Jan Svenungsson, Yuichiro Tamura, Javier Téllez, The Propeller Group, Suzanne Treister, Lars von Trier, Nomeda and Gediminas Urbonas, Jane and Louise Wilson, Ming Wong, Ulrich Wüst, Yoo Yeun Bok and Kim Yongtae, Zhang Peili

    Copublished with Busan Biennale Organizing Committee

    • Hardcover $28.00
  • Para-Platforms

    Para-Platforms

    On the Spatial Politics of Right-Wing Populism

    Markus Miessen and Zoë Ritts

    An investigation of the social, spatial, and material reality of right-wing populism.

    Para-Platforms investigates the social, spatial, and material reality of right-wing populism. Three case studies—presented in a symposium organized by Markus Miessen at the Gothenburg Design Festival in November 2017—form the core from which this collection of essays has grown: journalist Hannes Grassegger on Trump and Brexit; architectural theorist Stephan Trüby on spaces of right-wing extremism in Germany; and Christina Varvia on Forensic Architecture's investigation of the murder of Halit Yozgat, a young German man of Turkish descent, at the hands of a far-right group in 2006. The presentations are reproduced along with the ensuing conversations with Miessen and the audience members.

    An essay by anthropologist Mahmoud Keshavarz opens the book by discussing the capacity of design to create the conditions for certain politics. Among the other theoretical, artistic, and historical contributions, editor Zoë Ritts interviews artist Wolfgang Tillmans regarding his pro-EU poster series, the ongoing project truth study centre, and guest-edited volume What Is Different? The volume concludes with a comic by artist Liam Gillick animating a block of granite—culled from the Swedish quarry responsible for extracting the red granite intended for the Third Reich's architectural ambitions—as the messiah of spatial and material politics.

    • Paperback $24.95
  • Art without Death

    Art without Death

    Conversations on Russian Cosmism

    e-flux journal

    According to the nineteenth-century teachings of Nikolai Fedorov—librarian, religious philosopher, and progenitor of Russian cosmism—our ethical obligation to use reason and knowledge to care for the sick extends to curing the dead of their terminal status. The dead must be brought back to life using means of advanced technology—resurrected not as souls in heaven, but in material form, in this world, with all their memories and knowledge. 

    Fedorov's call to redistribute vital forces is wildly imaginative in emancipatory ambition. Today, it might appear arcane in its mystical panpsychism or eccentric in its embrace of realities that exist only in science fiction or certain diabolical strains of Silicon Valley techno-utopian ideology. It can be difficult to grasp how it ended up influencing the thinking behind a generation of young revolutionary anarchists and Marxists who incorporated Fedorov's ideas under their own brand of biocosmism before the 1917 Russian Revolution, even giving rise to the origins of the Soviet space program.    

    This book of interviews and conversations with today's most compelling living and resurrected artists and thinkers seeks to address the relevance of Russian cosmism and biocosmism in light of its influence on the Russian artistic and political vanguard as well as on today's art-historical apparatuses, weird materialisms, extinction narratives, and historical and temporal politics. This unprecedented collection of exchanges on cosmism asks how such an encompassing and imaginative, unapologetically humanist and anthropocentric strain of thinking could have been so historically and politically influential, especially when placed alongside the politically inconsequential—but in some sense equally encompassing—apocalypticism of contemporary realist imaginaries.

    Contributors Bart De Baere, Franco “Bifo” Berardi, Boris Groys, Elena Shaposhnikova, Marina Simakova, Hito Steyerl, Anton Vidokle, Brian Kuan Wood, Arseny Zhilyaev, Esther Zonsheim

    Published in parallel with the eponymous exhibition at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin.

    Series edited by Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Stephen Squibb, Anton VidokleDesign by Jeff Ramsey, front cover design by Liam Gillick

    • Paperback $24.00
  • Institutional Critique

    Institutional Critique

    An Anthology of Artists' Writings

    Alexander Alberro and Blake Stimson

    An anthology of writings and projects by artists who developed and extended the genre of institutional critique.

    "Institutional critique” is an artistic practice that reflects critically on its own housing in galleries and museums and on the concept and social function of art itself. Such concerns have always been a part of modern art but took on new urgency at the end of the 1960s, when—driven by the social upheaval of the time and enabled by the tools and techniques of conceptual art—institutional critique emerged as a genre. This anthology traces the development of institutional critique as an artistic concern from the 1960s to the present by gathering writings and representative art projects of artists from across Europe and throughout the Americas who developed and extended the genre. The texts and artworks included are notable for the range of perspectives and positions they reflect and for their influence in pushing the boundaries of what is meant by institutional critique. Like Alberro and Stimson's Conceptual Art: A Critical Anthology this volume will shed new light on its subject through its critical and historical framing. Even readers already familiar with institutional critique will come away from this book with a greater and often redirected understanding of its significance.

    Artists represented include Wieslaw Borowski, Daniel Buren, Marcel Broodthaers, Groupe de Recherche d'Art Visuel, Hans Haacke, Robert Smithson, John Knight, Graciela Carnevale, Osvaldo Mateo Boglione, Guerilla Art Action Group, Art Workers' Coalition, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Michael Asher, Mel Ramsden, Adrian Piper, The Guerrilla Girls, Laibach, Silvia Kolbowski, Andrea Fraser, Fred Wilson, Mark Dion, Maria Eichhorn, Critical Art Ensemble, Bureau d'Études, WochenKlausur, The Yes Men, Hito Steyerl, Andreas Siekmann.

    • Hardcover $39.95 £32.00
    • Paperback $59.95 £50.00