Jay C. Shambaugh

Jay C. Shambaugh is a Visiting Associate Professor at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University and was the Senior Economist for International Economics and then Chief Economist at the White House Council of Economic Advisers from 2009 to 2011.

  • Exchange Rate Regimes in the Modern Era

    Exchange Rate Regimes in the Modern Era

    Michael W. Klein and Jay C. Shambaugh

    An analysis of the operation and consequences of exchange rate regimes in an era of increasing international interdependence.

    The exchange rate is sometimes called the most important price in a highly globalized world. A country's choice of its exchange rate regime, between government-managed fixed rates and market-determined floating rates has significant implications for monetary policy, trade, and macroeconomic outcomes, and is the subject of both academic and policy debate. In this book, two leading economists examine the operation and consequences of exchange rate regimes in an era of increasing international interdependence.

    Michael Klein and Jay Shambaugh focus on the evolution of exchange rate regimes in the modern era, the period since 1973, which followed the Bretton Woods era of 1945–72 and the pre-World War I gold standard era. Klein and Shambaugh offer a comprehensive, integrated treatment of the characteristics of exchange rate regimes and their effects. The book draws on and synthesizes data from the recent wave of empirical research on this topic, and includes new findings that challenge preconceived notions.

    • Hardcover $9.75 £7.99
    • Paperback $19.75 £14.99

Contributor

  • What Have We Learned?

    What Have We Learned?

    Macroeconomic Policy after the Crisis

    George A. Akerlof, Olivier Blanchard, David Romer, and Joseph E. Stiglitz

    Top economists consider how to conduct policy in a world where previous beliefs have been shattered by the recent financial and economic crises.

    Since 2008, economic policymakers and researchers have occupied a brave new economic world. Previous consensuses have been upended, former assumptions have been cast into doubt, and new approaches have yet to stand the test of time. Policymakers have been forced to improvise and researchers to rethink basic theory. George Akerlof, Nobel Laureate and one of this volume's editors, compares the crisis to a cat stuck in a tree, afraid to move. In April 2013, the International Monetary Fund brought together leading economists and economic policymakers to discuss the slowly emerging contours of the macroeconomic future. This book offers their combined insights.

    The editors and contributors—who include the Nobel Laureate and bestselling author Joseph Stiglitz, Federal Reserve Vice Chair Janet Yellen, and the former Governor of the Bank of Israel Stanley Fischer—consider the lessons learned from the crisis and its aftermath. They discuss, among other things, post-crisis questions about the traditional policy focus on inflation; macroprudential tools (which focus on the stability of the entire financial system rather than of individual firms) and their effectiveness; fiscal stimulus, public debt, and fiscal consolidation; and exchange rate arrangements.

    • Hardcover $30.95 £24.00
    • Paperback $19.95 £14.99