John B. Taylor

John B. Taylor is Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics at Stanford University and George P. Schultz Fellow in Economics at the Hoover Institution.

  • Reform of the International Monetary System

    Reform of the International Monetary System

    Why and How?

    John B. Taylor

    An argument that a rules-based reform of the international monetary system, achieved by applying basic economic theory, would improve economic performance.

    In this book, the economist John Taylor argues that the apparent correlation of monetary policy decisions among different countries—largely the result of countries' concerns about the exchange rate—causes monetary policy to deviate from effective policies that stabilize inflation and the economy. He argues that a rules-based reform of the international monetary system, achieved by applying basic economic theory, would improve economic performance.

    Taylor shows that monetary polices in recent years have been deployed either defensively, as central banks counteract forces from abroad that affect the exchange rate, or offensively, as central banks attempt to move the exchange rate to gain a competitive advantage. Focusing on the years from 2005 to 2017, he develops an empirical framework to examine two monetary policy instruments: the policy interest rate (the more conventional of the two) and the size of the balance sheet. He finds that an international contagion in central bank decisions about the policy interest rate has accentuated the deviation from standard interest rate rules that have worked in the past. He finds a similar contagion in decisions about the size of the balance sheet. By considering a counterfactual policy in the estimated model, Taylor is able to estimate by how much the policy of recent years has increased exchange rate volatility. After several rounds of monetary actions and reactions aimed at exchange rates, Taylor finds, the international monetary system is left with roughly the same interest rate configuration, but much larger balance sheets to unwind.

    • Paperback $30.00 £24.00

Contributor

  • New Directions in Financial Services Regulation

    New Directions in Financial Services Regulation

    Roger B. Porter, Robert R. Glauber, and Thomas J. Healey

    Prominent policy makers, practitioners, and scholars discuss regulatory reform in the aftermath of the financial crisis of 2008.

    The financial crisis of 2008 raised crucial questions regarding the effectiveness of the way the United States regulates financial markets. What caused the crisis? What regulatory changes are most needed and desirable? What regulatory structure will best implement the desired changes? This volume addresses those questions with contributions from an ideologically diverse group of scholars, policy makers, and practitioners, including Paul Volcker, John Taylor, Richard Posner, and R. Glenn Hubbard. New Directions in Financial Services Regulation grows out of a conference hosted by the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government in October 2009, and the book reflects the dynamic give-and-take of the event. Each part of the book includes not only major papers and presentations but also a summary of the subsequent discussion. The book achieves a balance of academic and practitioner perspectives, with leaders of financial firms and regulatory bodies offering insights based on their experiences in the financial crisis of the year before.

    • Hardcover $8.75 £6.99
  • Understanding Inflation and the Implications for Monetary Policy

    Understanding Inflation and the Implications for Monetary Policy

    A Phillips Curve Retrospective

    Jeff Fuhrer, Yolanda K. Kodrzycki, Jane Sneddon Little, and Giovanni P. Olivei

    Current perspectives on the Phillips curve, a core macroeconomic concept that treats the relationship between inflation and unemployment.

    In 1958, economist A. W. Phillips published an article describing what he observed to be the inverse relationship between inflation and unemployment; subsequently, the “Phillips curve” became a central concept in macroeconomic analysis and policymaking. But today's Phillips curve is not the same as the original one from fifty years ago; the economy, our understanding of price setting behavior, the determinants of inflation, and the role of monetary policy have evolved significantly since then. In this book, some of the top economists working today reexamine the theoretical and empirical validity of the Phillips curve in its more recent specifications. The contributors consider such questions as what economists have learned about price and wage setting and inflation expectations that would improve the way we use and formulate the Phillips curve, what the Phillips curve approach can teach us about inflation dynamics, and how these lessons can be applied to improving the conduct of monetary policy.

    Contributors Lawrence Ball, Ben Bernanke, Oliver Blanchard, V. V. Chari, William T. Dickens, Stanley Fischer, Jeff Fuhrer, Jordi Gali, Michael T. Kiley, Robert G. King, Donald L. Kohn, Yolanda K. Kodrzycki, Jane Sneddon Little, Bartisz Mackowiak, N. Gregory Mankiw, Virgiliu Midrigan, Giovanni P. Olivei, Athanasios Orphanides, Adrian R. Pagan, Christopher A. Pissarides, Lucrezia Reichlin, Paul A. Samuelson, Christopher A. Sims, Frank R. Smets, Robert M. Solow, Jürgen Stark, James H. Stock, Lars E. O. Svensson, John B. Taylor, Mark W. Watson

    • Hardcover $19.75 £14.99