John McCarthy

The late John McCarthy was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Computer Science, Stanford University.

  • LISP 1.5 Programmer's Manual

    LISP 1.5 Programmer's Manual

    John McCarthy, Paul W. Abrahams, Daniel J. Edwards, Timothy P. Hart, and Michael I. Levin

    The manual describes LISP, a formal mathematical language. LISP differs from most programming languages in three important ways. The first way is in the nature of the data.

    The LISP language is designed primarily for symbolic data processing used for symbolic calculations in differential and integral calculus, electrical circuit theory, mathematical logic, game playing, and other fields of artificial intelligence. The manual describes LISP, a formal mathematical language. LISP differs from most programming languages in three important ways. The first way is in the nature of the data. In the LISP language, all data are in the form of symbolic expressions usually referred to as S-expressions, of indefinite length, and which have a branching tree-type of structure, so that significant subexpressions can be readily isolated. In the LISP system, the bulk of the available memory is used for storing S-expressions in the form of list structures. The second distinction is that the LISP language is the source language itself which specifies in what way the S-expressions are to be processed. Third, LISP can interpret and execute programs written in the form of S-expressions. Thus, like machine language, and unlike most other high level languages, it can be used to generate programs for further executions.

    • Paperback $20.00

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  • Semantic Information Processing

    Semantic Information Processing

    Marvin Minsky

    This book collects a group of experiments directed toward making intelligent machines. Each of the programs described here demonstrates some aspect of behavior that anyone would agree require some intelligence, and each program solves its own kinds of problems. These include resolving ambiguities in word meanings, finding analogies between things, making logical and nonlogical inferences, resolving inconsistencies in information, engaging in coherent discourse with a person, and building internal models for representation of newly acquired information. Each of the programs has serious limitations, but the chapter authors provide clear perspectives for viewing both the achievements and limitations of their programs. But what is much more important than what these particular programs achieve are the methods they use to achieve what they do.

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    • Paperback $30.00