John Stuart Vickers

Sir John Vickers is Drummond Professor of Political Economy at Oxford University.

  • Regulatory Reform

    Regulatory Reform

    Economic Analysis and British Experience

    Mark Armstrong, Simon Cowan, and John Stuart Vickers

    Regulatory reform had its beginnings in the United States in the 1970s, and today it is taking place around the globe. One of the central questions for industrial policy is how to regulate firms with market power. Regulatory Reform tackles this important policy issue in two parts: it describes an analytical framework for studying the main issues in regulatory reform, and then applies the analysis to the British experience in four utility industries - telecommunications, gas, electricity, and water supply. Britain's utility industries, state-owned monopolies just ten years ago, offer a dramatic example of comprehensive reforms with parallels elsewhere: industries have been restructured, markets have been liberalized, and new regulatory methods and institutions have been created. The authors focus on common policy questions that arise in each industry while taking into account the considerable diversity between the industries and the different reform policies adopted. The analysis and experience in Britain's utility industries also provides a rich variety of issues concerning monopolistic and anticompetitive practices that are of interest for competition policy in general. Regulation of Economic Activity series

    • Hardcover $60.00 £50.00
    • Paperback $45.00 £38.00
  • Privatization

    Privatization

    An Economic Analysis

    John Stuart Vickers and George Yarrow

    This comprehensive analysis of the British privatization program offers insights into recent policies on privatization, competition, and regulation in a country that has by far the greatest experience with this growing worldwide phenomenon. The process of selling assets and enterprises to the private sector raises theoretical questions about natural monopolies, the efficiency and equity of state owned versus privately-owned enterprises, and industrial policy. Privatization explores these questions both theoretically and empirically. After providing theoretical perspectives on the economics of ownership, competition, and regulation, the authors assess privatization policies in key industries: telecommunications, energy, transport, and water. They argue that the government's haste to transfer ownership reflects a misplaced priority, and that the main thrust of policy should be to improve industrial efficiency by stimulating competition and, providing effective regulation.

    Privatization: An Economic Analysis is included in the series Regulation of Economic Activity, edited by Richard Schmalensee.

    • Hardcover $47.50
    • Paperback $40.00 £32.00

Contributor

  • Taxation and Regulation of the Financial Sector

    Taxation and Regulation of the Financial Sector

    Ruud de Mooij and Gaëtan Nicodème

    Analytical and empirical perspectives on the interplay of taxation and regulation in the financial sector.

    The global financial crisis has prompted economists to rethink fundamental questions on how governments should intervene in the financial sector. Many countries have already begun to reform the taxation and regulation of the financial sector—in the United States, for example, the Dodd–Frank Act became law in 2010; in Europe, different countries have introduced additional taxes on the sector and made substantial progress toward a banking union for the eurozone. Only recently, however, has a new field in economics emerged to study the interplay between public finance and banking. This book offers the latest thinking on the topic by American and European economists.

    The contributors first explore new conceptual ground, offering rigorous theoretical analyses that help us better understand how tax policy and regulation can contribute to avoiding another crisis or reducing its impact. Contributors then investigate the behavior of financial institutions in response to various forms of taxation and regulation, offering empirical evidence that is vital for policy design.

    Contributors Thiess Buettner, Jin Cao, Giuseppina Cannas, Gunther Capelle-Blancard, Jessica Cariboni, Brian Coulter, Ernesto Crivelli, Ruud de Mooij, Michael P. Devereux, Katharina Erbe, Ricardo Fenochietto, Marco Petracco Giudici, Timothy J. Goodspeed, Reint Gropp, Olena Havyrlchyk, Michael Keen, Lawrence L. Kreicher, Julia Lendvai, Ben Lockwood, Massimo Marchesi, Donato Masciandaro, Colin Mayer, Robert N. McCauley, Patrick McGuire, Gaëtan Nicodème, Masanori Orihara, Francesco Passarelli, Carola Pessino, Rafal Raciborski, John Vickers, Lukas Vogel, Stefano Zedda

    • Hardcover $19.75 £15.99
  • What Have We Learned?

    What Have We Learned?

    Macroeconomic Policy after the Crisis

    George A. Akerlof, Olivier Blanchard, David Romer, and Joseph E. Stiglitz

    Top economists consider how to conduct policy in a world where previous beliefs have been shattered by the recent financial and economic crises.

    Since 2008, economic policymakers and researchers have occupied a brave new economic world. Previous consensuses have been upended, former assumptions have been cast into doubt, and new approaches have yet to stand the test of time. Policymakers have been forced to improvise and researchers to rethink basic theory. George Akerlof, Nobel Laureate and one of this volume's editors, compares the crisis to a cat stuck in a tree, afraid to move. In April 2013, the International Monetary Fund brought together leading economists and economic policymakers to discuss the slowly emerging contours of the macroeconomic future. This book offers their combined insights.

    The editors and contributors—who include the Nobel Laureate and bestselling author Joseph Stiglitz, Federal Reserve Vice Chair Janet Yellen, and the former Governor of the Bank of Israel Stanley Fischer—consider the lessons learned from the crisis and its aftermath. They discuss, among other things, post-crisis questions about the traditional policy focus on inflation; macroprudential tools (which focus on the stability of the entire financial system rather than of individual firms) and their effectiveness; fiscal stimulus, public debt, and fiscal consolidation; and exchange rate arrangements.

    • Hardcover $31.95 £26.00
    • Paperback $19.95 £15.99
  • Handbook of Antitrust Economics

    Handbook of Antitrust Economics

    Paolo Buccirossi

    Experts examine the application of economic theory to antitrust issues in both the United States and Europe, discussing mergers, agreements, abuses of dominance, and the impact of market features.

    Over the past twenty years, economic theory has begun to play a central role in antitrust matters. In earlier days, the application of antitrust rules was viewed almost entirely in formal terms; now it is widely accepted that the proper interpretation of these rules requires an understanding of how markets work and how firms can alter their efficient functioning. The Handbook of Antitrust Economics offers scholars, students, administrators, courts, companies, and lawyers the economist's view of the subject, describing the application of newly developed theoretical models and improved empirical methods to antitrust and competition law in both the United States and the European Union. (The book uses the U.S. term “antitrust law” and the European “competition law” interchangeably, emphasizing the commonalities between the two jurisdictions.)

    After a general discussion of the use of empirical methods in antitrust cases, the Handbook covers mergers, agreements, abuses of dominance (or unilateral conducts), and market features that affect the way firms compete. Chapters examine such topics as analyzing the competitive effects of both horizontal and vertical mergers, detecting and preventing cartels, theoretical and empirical analysis of vertical restraints, state aids, the relationship of competition law to the defense of intellectual property, and the application of antitrust law to “bidding markets,” network industries, and two-sided markets.

    Contributors Mark Armstrong, Jonathan B. Baker, Timothy F. Bresnahan, Paulo Buccirossi, Nicholas Economides, Hans W. Friederiszick, Luke M. Froeb, Richard J. Gilbert, Joseph E. Harrington, Jr., Paul Klemperer, Kai-Uwe Kuhn, Francine Lafontaine, Damien J. Neven, Patrick Rey, Michael H. Riordan, Jean-Charles Rochet, Lars-Hendrick Röller, Margaret Slade, Giancarlo Spagnolo, Jean Tirole, Thibaud Vergé, Vincent Verouden, John Vickers, Gregory J. Werden

    • Hardcover $95.00
    • Paperback $65.00 £55.00