John Whalley

John Whalley is Professor of Economics at the University of Western Ontario, Research Associate at NBER, and Coordinator of the Global Economy Group at CESifo.

  • Privatization Experiences in the European Union

    Privatization Experiences in the European Union

    Marko Köthenbürger, Hans-Werner Sinn, and John Whalley

    Experts evaluate the varied outcomes of privatization experiences in Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the UK.

    The trend toward privatization, which began with privatization experiments in the UK under Margaret Thatcher and the deregulation of the telecommunications sector in the United States, has attracted the attention of policymakers over the past two decades. Privatization is broadly supported by most academic economists, but the results of actual privatization efforts seem mixed. In the UK, for example, telecom rates fell sharply after privatization, but privatized rail service was widely perceived to have declined dramatically in quality. In this CESifo volume, international experts examine the experiences of 10 EU countries, evaluating the real outcomes of privatization policies in Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the UK.The effects of privatization—which includes not only changes in ownership of public activitiesand entities but also liberalization of markets and deregulation—are difficult to distinguish from the effects of other economywide influences. The studies in this volume meet this methodological challenge by using a well-defined set of criteria, including reducing consumer prices, increasing quantity, and improving quality, by which to make their assessments. Background chapters provide a conceptual framework for considering the issues.

    Contributors Pablo Arocena, Sean D. Barrett, Ansgar Belke, Michel Berne, Henrik Christoffersen, Andrea Goldstein, Günter Knieps, David Newbery, Martin Paldam, David Parker, Gérard Pogorel, Friedrich Schneider, Eric van Damme, Ingo Vogelsang, Johan Willner

    • Hardcover $9.75 £7.99
  • General Equilibrium Trade Policy Modeling

    John Whalley and T. N. Srinivasan

    This collection of original essays makes a substantial contribution to the empirical analysis of trade policy and to the current debate on a new international economic order. They address policy from a strictly economic viewpoint, using computable general equilibrium models as analytical tools and assessing the strengths and weaknesses of these models, which are being increasingly used for policy analysis in international trade and other branches of economics. The essays all examine the effects of 50 percent tariff cuts on the various economies modeled. However, since some models are global (multicountry) and others are single country, such cuts can take several forms: unilateral, multilateral, or bilateral. The models show wide variation in their results. This points up the need for caution in using such models for rigid policy advice and for further improvement in data and techniques if trade modeling is to become effective. Nonetheless, the strength of such models in making explicit the implicit assumptions of policymakers and in providing a quantitative framework for trade policy evaluation is clearly revealed.

    • Hardcover $50.00
  • Trade Liberalization among Major World Trading Areas

    Trade Liberalization among Major World Trading Areas

    John Whalley

    This book provides a much needed quantitative response to the classic question of who gains and who loses in trade liberalization and shows how important the process is for the global economy. It contributes significantly to the debate concerning trade between developed and developing countries.

    John Whalley describes and uses a numerical general equilibrium model of world trade to explore issues in the area of trade liberalization among major world trading areas - the European Economic Community, the United States, Japan, and developing countries. His book is unique both in using this framework to analyze world trading patterns, and in considering a number of trading areas simultaneously within the same model. It is able to quantify the merits of alternative actions in international trade policy, the ways that the interests of the EEC, the United States, and Japan are similar and ways in which they differ, and show how the interests of less developed countries are affected by various trade liberalization initiatives.

    Part I provides a description of the model, data sources and adjustments to basic data, and methods for specification and solution of the model. Part II presents results from model applications along with policy conclusions. Applications include analysis of tariff cutting formulae in the Tokyo Round, an evaluation of the Tokyo Round trade agreement, examination of incentives for a retaliatory trade protection 'war' between world trade blocs, and analysis of the impact of protectionist policies on North-South trade.

    • Hardcover $52.00 £42.00

Contributor

  • The Continuing Evolution of Europe

    The Continuing Evolution of Europe

    Thiess Buettner and Wolfgang Ochel

    Economists address key challenges facing the EU, including financial instability, welfare state reform, inadequate institutional framework, and global economic integration.

    The European Union began with efforts in the Cold War era to foster economic integration among a few Western European countries. Today's EU constitutes an upper tier of government that affects almost every level of policymaking in each of its twenty-seven member states. The recent financial and economic crises have tested this still-evolving institutional framework, and this book surveys key economic challenges faced by the EU.

    Prominent European economists examine such topics as the stability of the financial markets and possible policy options to reduce future vulnerability to crises, including Glass-Steagull-style narrow banking; the effect of emerging economies such as China and India on Europe's economic position; the protection of national interests in industrial policy; reforming and preserving the welfare state in the face of unemployment, population aging, and worker mobility within the EU; and improving the EU's institutional framework by reassigning responsibilities among supranational, national, and local governments.

    Among the conclusions that emerge from these analyses are the necessity for banking regulation as well as budgetary discipline; the need to consider global as well as European integration; and the idea that an environment that fosters internal competition will increase Europe's competitiveness internationally.

    • Hardcover $7.75 £5.99
    • Paperback $25.00 £20.00