Joshua Cohen

Joshua Cohen is Coeditor-in-Chief of Boston Review, member of the faculty of Apple University, and Distinguished Senior Fellow in Law, Philosophy, and Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Economics after Neoliberalism

    Economics after Neoliberalism

    Joshua Cohen

    How we can look beyond the tyranny of market logic in our public lives to reimagine the fundamentals of democracy.

    Bringing together thirty-two world-class economists, Economics After Neoliberalism offers a powerful case for a new brand of economics—one focused on power and inequality and aimed at a more inclusive society.

    Three prominent economists—Suresh Naidu, Dani Rodrik, and Gabriel Zucman—lead off with a vision for economic policy that stands as a genuine alternative to market fundamentalism. Contributors from across the spectrum expand on the state of creative ferment Naidu, Rodrik, and Zucman describe and offer new essays that challenge the current shape of markets and suggest more democratic alternatives.

    Contributors

    Samuel Bowles, Ethan Bueno de Mesquita, Oren Cass, William R. Easterly, Alice Evans, Amy Kapczynski, Robert Manduca, Suresh Naidu, Caleb Orr, Lenore Palladino, Margaret Peters, Corey Robin, Dani Rodrik, Debra Satz, Quinn Slobodian, Marshall Steinbaum, Arvind Subramanian, Gabriel Zucman.

    • Paperback $16.00 £12.99
  • Evil Empire

    Evil Empire

    Deborah Chasman and Joshua Cohen

    Investigation of power and dominion, through the lens of genre fiction, interviews, and essays.

    “All history,” writes Maximillian Alvarez, “is the history of empire—a bid for control of that greatest expanse of territory, the past.” Evil Empire confronts these histories head-on, exploring the motivations, consequences, and surprising resiliency of empire and its narratives. Contributors grapple with the economic, technological, racial, and rhetorical elements of U.S. power and show how the effects are far-reaching and, in many ways, self-defeating. Drawing on a range of disciplines—from political science to science fiction—our authors approach the theme with imagination and urgency, animated by the desire to strengthen the fight for a better future.

    Contributors Maximillian Alvarez, Mark Bould, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Adom Getachew, Yuri Herrera, Michael Kimmage, Marisol LeBrón, Pankaj Mishra, Jeanne Morefield, Frank Pasquale, Arundhati Roy, Stuart Schrader, Nikhil Pal Singh

    • Paperback $16.00 £12.99

Contributor

  • On Anger

    Agnes Callard

    Is anger eternal? Righteous? Reflections on the causes and consequences of an phenomenon critical to our intimate and public lives.

    From Aristotle to Martha Nussbaum, philosophers have explored the moral status of anger. We get angry for a reason: we feel wronged. That reason can be eternal, some argue, because not even an apology or promise that it won't happen again can change the fact of the original harm. Although there are pragmatic reasons for ceasing to be angry and moving on, is eternal anger moral? Is anger righteous? In this collection, contributors consider these and other questions about the causes and consequences of anger.

    Leading off the debate, philosopher Agnes Callard argues that anger is not righteous rage; it is not an effort to solve a problem. Instead, it reflects a cry for help—a recognition that something shared is broken. And only in acknowledging the value of that shared project, she argues, can we begin together to repair it. Anger, then, is a starting point. But could there ever be the end of anger?Bringing together today's leading thinkers on anger, this volume raises questions critical to our intimate and public lives.

    • Paperback $15.95 £12.99
  • Left Elsewhere

    Left Elsewhere

    Elizabeth Catte

    An examination of the emerging rural left, from environmentalists blocking pipeline construction to teachers on strike.

    In Left Elsewhere, volume editor and lead essayist Elizabeth Catte turns a skeptical eye toward “purple” politicians, such as West Virginia Democrat Richard Ojeda, who are hailed by many as the best hope for U.S. progressives outside the urban coasts. By offering a survey of what the left actually looks like outside major urban centers, Catte shows how an emerging rural left is developing new strategies that do not easily fit into typical ideas of liberals, leftists, and Democratic politics. From environmentalists who successfully block pipeline construction to advocates for “radical” health care solutions such as needle exchanges to school teachers who go on strike, these newly energized activists may offer a better path forward for both policy and candidates to represent the needs of poor and working Americans.  

    By engaging activists and scholars outside the coastal bubbles, this collection offers insights into several overlooked areas, including working-class women's activism, victories in new labor struggle (especially in staunchly right-to-work states) and new organizing principles in Jackson, Mississippi—"America's most radical city"—that are bringing about meaningful racial and economic change on the ground. Taken together, the essays in Left Elsewhere show that today's political language is insufficient to convey what's happening in these areas and examine what, if any, coherent set of politics can be assigned to them.

    Contributors William J. Barber II, Thomas Baxter, Lesly-Marie Buer, Ash-Lee Woodard Henderson, Nancy Isenberg, Elaine C. Kamarck, Michael Kazin, Toussaint Losier, Robin McDowell, Bob Moser, Hugh Ryan, Matt Stoller, Ruy Teixeira, Makani Themba, Jessica Wilkerson

    • Paperback $16.00 £12.99
  • Fifty Years Since MLK

    Fifty Years Since MLK

    Brandon Terry

    Martin Luther King's legacy for today's activists, fifty years after his death.

    Since his death on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King's legacy has influenced generations of activism. Edited and with a lead essay by Brandon Terry, this volume explores what this legacy can and cannot do for activism in the present.

    King spent the months leading up to his death organizing demonstrations against the Vietnam War and planning the Poor People's Campaign, a “multiracial army of the poor” that would march on Washington in pursuit of economic justice. Thus the spring of 1968 represented a hopeful, albeit chaotic set of possibilities; King, along with countless other activists, offered both ethical and strategic solutions to the multifaceted problems of war, racism, and economic inequality. With a critical eye on both the past and present, this collection of essays explores that moment of promise, and how, in the fifty years since King's death, historical forces have shaped what we claim as a usable past in fighting the injustices of our time.

    Contributors Christian G. Appy, Andrew Douglas, Bernard E. Harcourt, Elizabeth Hinton, Samuel Moyn, Ed Pavlić, Aziz Rana, Barbara Ransby, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Brandon M. Terry, Jeanne Theoharis, Thad Williamson

    • Paperback $16.00 £12.99
  • Movies and the Moral Adventure of Life

    Movies and the Moral Adventure of Life

    Alan A. Stone

    Essays on small art films and big-budget blockbusters, including Antonia's Line, American Beauty, Schindler's List, and The Passion of the Christ, that view films as life lessons, enlarging our sense of human possibilities.

    For Alan Stone, a one-time Freudian analyst and former president of the American Psychiatric Society, movies are the great modern, democratic medium for exploring our individual and collective lives. They provide occasions for reflecting on what he calls “the moral adventure of life”: the choices people make—beyond the limits of their character and circumstances—in response to life's challenges. The quality of these choices is, for him, the measure of a life well lived. In this collection of his film essays, Stone reads films as life texts. He is engaged more by their ideas than their visual presentation, more by their power to move us than by their commercial success. Stone writes about both art films and big-budget Hollywood blockbusters. And he commands an extraordinary range of historical, literary, cultural, and scientific reference that reflects his impressive personal history: professor of law and medicine, football player at Harvard in the late 1940s, director of medical training at McLean Hospital, and advisor to Attorney General Janet Reno on behavioral science. In the end, Stone's enthusiasms run particularly to films that embrace the sheer complexity of life, and in doing so enlarge our sense of human possibilities: in Antonia's Line, he sees an emotionally vivid picture of a world beyond patriarchy; in Thirteen Conversations about One Thing, the power of sheer contingency in human life; and in American Beauty, how beauty in ordinary experience draws us outside ourselves, and how beauty and justice are distinct goods, with no intrinsic connection. Other films discussed in these essays (written between 1993 and 2006 for Boston Review) include Un Coeur en Hiver, Schindler's List, Pulp Fiction, Thirteen Days, the 1997 version of Lolita, The Battle of Algiers, The Passion of the Christ, Persuasion, and Water.

    • Hardcover $17.95 £14.99