Julia Bryan-Wilson

Julia Bryan-Wilson is Associate Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art at the University of California, Berkeley, and the author of Art Workers: Radical Practice in the Vietnam War Era.

  • Robert Morris

    Robert Morris

    Julia Bryan-Wilson

    Essays, an interview, and a roundtable discussion on the work of one of the most influential American artists of the postwar period.

    This October Files volume gathers essays, an interview, and a roundtable discussion on the work of Robert Morris, one of the most influential American artists of the postwar period. It includes a little-known text on dance by Morris himself and a never-before-anthologized but influential catalog essay by Annette Michelson. Often associated with minimalism, Morris (b. 1931) also created important works that involved dance, process art, and conceptualism. The texts in this volume focus on Morris's early work and include an examination of a 1971 Tate retrospective by Jon Bird, an interview with the artist by Benjamin Buchloh, a conversation from a 1994 issue of October about resistance to 1960s art, and an essay by this volume's editor, Julia Bryan-Wilson, on the labor involved in installing the massive works in Morris's 1970 solo exhibition at the Whitney. Spanning 1965 to 2009, these writings map the evolution of critical thought on Morris over more than four decades.

    • Hardcover $37.00 £30.00
    • Paperback $24.95 £20.00

Contributor

  • Hello Leonora, Soy Anne Walsh

    Hello Leonora, Soy Anne Walsh

    Anne Walsh and Rachel Churner

    Video and performance artist Anne Walsh's encounter with and multipart response to surrealist painter Leonora Carrington's novel The Hearing Trumpet.

    Contributions by Dodie Bellamy, Julia Bryan-Wilson, and Claudia LaRocco

    Over the past decade, artist Anne Walsh has created an ongoing, multipart response to surrealist painter Leonora Carrington's novel The Hearing Trumpet (written in the early 1960s, published in 1974). Walsh's interdisciplinary works, encompassing video, writing, and performance, chronicle her time with the nonagenarian author and, ultimately, her assumption of the identity of the aging artist. Hello Leonora, Soy Anne Walsh is a visual and written “adaptation” of Carrington's feminist novella, offering a narrative in fragments: a middle-aged artist named Anne Walsh falls in love with the 92-year-old author of a book about a 92-year-old woman who is placed in a sinister and increasingly surreal retirement home.

    Walsh courts the author, travels to Mexico to meet her, fantasizes about adapting the book for film, and spends the next decade searching for The Hearing Trumpet's form and cast. Having discovered in Carrington's novel a thrilling, subversive example of old age, Walsh casts herself as an “Apprentice Crone.” She stalks old people and takes selfies with them. She becomes a mother, passes through menopause. She sings her daughter's Disney movie songs at “elder theater” classes. She studies and rehearses the trauma, the affliction, the indignity that is old age, and she writes to Leonora Carrington.

    The story is told through facsimiles of hand-written letters, annotated research notes, post-it note flow charts, cast lists, scripts, and a photographic essay that loosely narrates Walsh's visits to Carrington in Mexico City, with additional texts by writer Dodie Bellamy, art historian Julia Bryan-Wilson, and poet and critic Claudia La Rocco.

    • Paperback $40.00 £32.00