Karl J. Friston

Karl J. Friston is Wellcome Principal Fellow and Scientific Director of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging and a Professor at University College London.

  • The Pragmatic Turn

    The Pragmatic Turn

    Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science

    Andreas K. Engel, Karl J. Friston, and Danica Kragic

    Experts from a range of disciplines assess the foundations and implications of a novel action-oriented view of cognition.

    Cognitive science is experiencing a pragmatic turn away from the traditional representation-centered framework toward a view that focuses on understanding cognition as “enactive.” This enactive view holds that cognition does not produce models of the world but rather subserves action as it is grounded in sensorimotor skills. In this volume, experts from cognitive science, neuroscience, psychology, robotics, and philosophy of mind assess the foundations and implications of a novel action-oriented view of cognition.

    Their contributions and supporting experimental evidence show that an enactive approach to cognitive science enables strong conceptual advances, and the chapters explore key concepts for this new model of cognition. The contributors discuss the implications of an enactive approach for cognitive development; action-oriented models of cognitive processing; action-oriented understandings of consciousness and experience; and the accompanying paradigm shifts in the fields of philosophy, brain science, robotics, and psychology.

    Contributors Moshe Bar, Lawrence W. Barsalov, Olaf Blanke, Jeannette Bohg, Martin V. Butz, Peter F. Dominey, Andreas K. Engel, Judith M. Ford, Karl J. Friston, Chris D. Frith, Shaun Gallagher, Antonia Hamilton, Tobias Heed, Cecilia Heyes, Elisabeth Hill, Matej Hoffmann, Jakob Hohwy, Bernhard Hommel, Atsushi Iriki, Pierre Jacob, Henrik Jörntell, Jürgen Jost, James Kilner, Günther Knoblich, Peter König, Danica Kragic, Miriam Kyselo, Alexander Maye, Marek McGann, Richard Menary, Thomas Metzinger, Ezequiel Morsella, Saskia Nagel, Kevin J. O'Regan, Pierre-Yves Oudeyer, Giovanni Pezzulo, Tony J. Prescott, Wolfgang Prinz, Friedemann Pulvermüller, Robert Rupert, Marti Sanchez-Fibla, Andrew Schwartz, Anil K. Seth, Vicky Southgate, Antonella Tramacere, John K. Tsotsos, Paul F. M. J. Verschure, Gabriella Vigliocco, Gottfried Vosgerau

    • Hardcover $49.00 £38.00
  • Principles of Brain Dynamics

    Principles of Brain Dynamics

    Global State Interactions

    Mikhail I. Rabinovich, Karl J. Friston, and Pablo Varona

    Experimental and theoretical approaches to global brain dynamics that draw on the latest research in the field.

    The consideration of time or dynamics is fundamental for all aspects of mental activity—perception, cognition, and emotion—because the main feature of brain activity is the continuous change of the underlying brain states even in a constant environment. The application of nonlinear dynamics to the study of brain activity began to flourish in the 1990s when combined with empirical observations from modern morphological and physiological observations. This book offers perspectives on brain dynamics that draw on the latest advances in research in the field. It includes contributions from both theoreticians and experimentalists, offering an eclectic treatment of fundamental issues.

    Topics addressed range from experimental and computational approaches to transient brain dynamics to the free-energy principle as a global brain theory. The book concludes with a short but rigorous guide to modern nonlinear dynamics and their application to neural dynamics.

    • Hardcover $72.00 £56.00

Contributor

  • Computational Psychiatry

    Computational Psychiatry

    New Perspectives on Mental Illness

    A. David Redish and Joshua A. Gordon

    Psychiatrists and neuroscientists discuss the potential of computational approaches to address problems in psychiatry including diagnosis, treatment, and integration with neurobiology.

    Modern psychiatry is at a crossroads, as it attempts to balance neurological analysis with psychological assessment. Computational neuroscience offers a new lens through which to view such thorny issues as diagnosis, treatment, and integration with neurobiology. In this volume, psychiatrists and theoretical and computational neuroscientists consider the potential of computational approaches to psychiatric issues.

    This unique collaboration yields surprising results, innovative synergies, and novel open questions. The contributors consider mechanisms of psychiatric disorders, the use of computation and imaging to model psychiatric disorders, ways that computation can inform psychiatric nosology, and specific applications of the computational approach.

    Contributors Susanne E. Ahmari, Huda Akil, Deanna M. Barch, Matthew Botvinick, Michael Breakspear, Cameron S. Carter, Matthew V. Chafee, Sophie Denève, Daniel Durstewitz, Michael B. First, Shelly B. Flagel, Michael J. Frank, Karl J. Friston, Joshua A. Gordon, Katia M. Harlé, Crane Huang, Quentin J. M. Huys, Peter W. Kalivas, John H. Krystal, Zeb Kurth-Nelson, Angus W. MacDonald III, Tiago V. Maia, Robert C. Malenka, Sanjay J. Mathew, Christoph Mathys, P. Read Montague, Rosalyn Moran, Theoden I. Netoff, Yael Niv, John P. O'Doherty, Wolfgang M. Pauli, Martin P. Paulus, Frederike Petzschner, Daniel S. Pine, A. David Redish, Kerry Ressler, Katharina Schmack, Jordan W. Smoller, Klaas Enno Stephan, Anita Thapar, Heike Tost, Nelson Totah, Jennifer L. Zick

    • Hardcover $45.00 £35.00
  • Visual Population Codes

    Visual Population Codes

    Toward a Common Multivariate Framework for Cell Recording and Functional Imaging

    Nikolaus Kriegeskorte and Gabriel Kreiman

    How visual content is represented in neuronal population codes and how to analyze such codes with multivariate techniques.

    Vision is a massively parallel computational process, in which the retinal image is transformed over a sequence of stages so as to emphasize behaviorally relevant information (such as object category and identity) and deemphasize other information (such as viewpoint and lighting). The processes behind vision operate by concurrent computation and message passing among neurons within a visual area and between different areas. The theoretical concept of "population code" encapsulates the idea that visual content is represented at each stage by the pattern of activity across the local population of neurons. Understanding visual population codes ultimately requires multichannel measurement and multivariate analysis of activity patterns. Over the past decade, the multivariate approach has gained significant momentum in vision research. Functional imaging and cell recording measure brain activity in fundamentally different ways, but they now use similar theoretical concepts and mathematical tools in their modeling and analyses.

    With a focus on the ventral processing stream thought to underlie object recognition, this book presents recent advances in our understanding of visual population codes, novel multivariate pattern-information analysis techniques, and the beginnings of a unified perspective for cell recording and functional imaging. It serves as an introduction, overview, and reference for scientists and students across disciplines who are interested in human and primate vision and, more generally, in understanding how the brain represents and processes information.

    • Hardcover $19.75 £14.99
  • Dynamic Coordination in the Brain

    Dynamic Coordination in the Brain

    From Neurons to Mind

    Christoph von der Malsburg, William A. Phillips, and Wolf Singer

    An examination of how widely distributed and specialized activities of the brain are flexibly and effectively coordinated.

    A fundamental shift is occurring in neuroscience and related disciplines. In the past, researchers focused on functional specialization of the brain, discovering complex processing strategies based on convergence and divergence in slowly adapting anatomical architectures. Yet for the brain to cope with ever-changing and unpredictable circumstances, it needs strategies with richer interactive short-term dynamics. Recent research has revealed ways in which the brain effectively coordinates widely distributed and specialized activities to meet the needs of the moment. This book explores these findings, examining the functions, mechanisms, and manifestations of distributed dynamical coordination in the brain and mind across different species and levels of organization. The book identifies three basic functions of dynamic coordination: contextual disambiguation, dynamic grouping, and dynamic routing. It considers the role of dynamic coordination in temporally structured activity and explores these issues at different levels, from synaptic and local circuit mechanisms to macroscopic system dynamics, emphasizing their importance for cognition, behavior, and psychopathology.

    Contributors Evan Balaban, György Buzsáki, Nicola S. Clayton, Maurizio Corbetta, Robert Desimone, Kamran Diba, Shimon Edelman, Andreas K. Engel, Yves Fregnac, Pascal Fries, Karl Friston, Ann Graybiel, Sten Grillner, Uri Grodzinski, John-Dylan Haynes, Laurent Itti, Erich D. Jarvis, Jon H. Kaas, J.A. Scott Kelso, Peter König, Nancy J. Kopell, Ilona Kovács, Andreas Kreiter, Anders Lansner, Gilles Laurent, Jörg Lücke, Mikael Lundqvist, Angus MacDonald, Kevan Martin, Mayank Mehta, Lucia Melloni, Earl K. Miller, Bita Moghaddam, Hannah Monyer, Edvard I. Moser, May-Britt Moser, Danko Nikolic, William A. Phillips, Gordon Pipa, Constantin Rothkopf, Terrence J. Sejnowski, Steven M. Silverstein, Wolf Singer, Catherine Tallon-Baudry, Roger D. Traub, Jochen Triesch, Peter Uhlhaas, Christoph von der Malsburg, Thomas Weisswange, Miles Whittington, Matthew Wilson

    • Hardcover $19.75 £14.99
  • Foundational Issues in Human Brain Mapping

    Foundational Issues in Human Brain Mapping

    Stephen José Hanson and Martin Bunzl

    Neuroimagers and philosophers of mind explore critical issues and controversies that have arisen from the use of brain mapping in cognitive neuroscience and cognitive science.

    The field of neuroimaging has reached a watershed. Brain imaging research has been the source of many advances in cognitive neuroscience and cognitive science over the last decade, but recent critiques and emerging trends are raising foundational issues of methodology, measurement, and theory. Indeed, concerns over interpretation of brain maps have created serious controversies in social neuroscience, and, more important, point to a larger set of issues that lie at the heart of the entire brain mapping enterprise. In this volume, leading scholars—neuroimagers and philosophers of mind—reexamine these central issues and explore current controversies that have arisen in cognitive science, cognitive neuroscience, computer science, and signal processing. The contributors address both statistical and dynamical analysis and modeling of neuroimaging data and interpretation, discussing localization, modularity, and neuroimagers' tacit assumptions about how these two phenomena are related; controversies over correlation of fMRI data and social attributions (recently characterized for good or ill as "voodoo correlations"); and the standard inferential design approach in neuroimaging. Finally, the contributors take a more philosophical perspective, considering the nature of measurement in brain imaging, and offer a framework for novel neuroimaging data structures (effective and functional connectivity—"graphs").

    Contributors William Bechtel, Bharat Biswal, Matthew Brett, Martin Bunzl, Max Coltheart, Karl J. Friston, Joy J. Geng, Clark Glymour, Kalanit Grill-Spector, Stephen José Hanson, Trevor Harley, Gilbert Harman, James V. Haxby, Rik N. Henson, Nancy Kanwisher, Colin Klein, Richard Loosemore, Sébastien Meriaux, Chris Mole, Jeanette A. Mumford, Russell A. Poldrack, Jean-Baptiste Poline, Richard C. Richardson, Alexis Roche, Adina L. Roskies, Pia Rotshtein, Rebecca Saxe, Philipp Sterzer, Bertrand Thirion, Edward Vul

    • Hardcover $16.75 £13.99
    • Paperback $19.75 £14.99
  • The Cognitive Neurosciences, Fourth Edition

    The Cognitive Neurosciences, Fourth Edition

    Michael S. Gazzaniga

    The fourth edition of the work that defines the field of cognitive neuroscience, offering completely new material.

    Each edition of this classic reference has proved to be a benchmark in the developing field of cognitive neuroscience. The fourth edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences continues to chart new directions in the study of the biologic underpinnings of complex cognition—the relationship between the structural and physiological mechanisms of the nervous system and the psychological reality of the mind. The material in this edition is entirely new, with all chapters written specifically for it.

    Since the publication of the third edition, the field of cognitive neuroscience has made rapid and dramatic advances; fundamental stances are changing and new ideas are emerging. This edition reflects the vibrancy of the field, with research in development and evolution that finds a dynamic growth pattern becoming specific and fixed, and research in plasticity that sees the neuronal systems always changing; exciting new empirical evidence on attention that also verifies many central tenets of longstanding theories; work that shows the boundaries of the motor system pushed further into cognition; memory research that, paradoxically, provides insight into how humans imagine future events; pioneering theoretical and methodological work in vision; new findings on how genes and experience shape the language faculty; new ideas about how the emotional brain develops and operates; and research on consciousness that ranges from a novel mechanism for how the brain generates the baseline activity necessary to sustain conscious experience to a bold theoretical attempt to make the problem of qualia more tractable.

    • Hardcover $39.75 £30.00
  • Brain Signal Analysis

    Brain Signal Analysis

    Advances in Neuroelectric and Neuromagnetic Methods

    Todd C. Handy

    Recent developments in the tools and techniques of data acquisition and analysis in cognitive electrophysiology.

    Cognitive electrophysiology concerns the study of the brain's electrical and magnetic responses to both external and internal events. These can be measured using electroencephalograms (EEGs) or magnetoencephalograms (MEGs). With the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), another method of tracking brain signals, the tools and techniques of ERP, EEG and MEG data acquisition and analysis have been developing at a similarly rapid pace, and this book offers an overview of key recent advances in cognitive electrophysiology. The chapters highlight the increasing overlap in EEG and MEG analytic techniques, describing several methods applicable to both; they discuss recent developments, including reverse correlation methods in visual-evoked potentials and a new approach to topographic mapping in high-density electrode montage; and they relate the latest thinking on design aspects of EEG/MEG studies, discussing how to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio as well as statistical developments for maximizing power and accuracy in data analysis using repeated-measure ANOVAS.

    Contributors Denis Brunet, Douglas Cheyne, Marzia De Lucia, Sam M. Doesburg, John J. Foxe, Karl J. Friston, Marta I. Garrido, Sara L. Gonzalez Andino, Rolando Grave de Peralta Menendez, Jessica J. Green, Todd C. Handy, Anthony T. Herdman, Stefan J. Kiebel, Edmund C. Lalor, Theodor Landis, Teresa Y. L. Liu-Ambrose, John. J. McDonald, Christoph M. Michel, Marla J. S. Mickleborough, Micah M. Murray, Lindsay S. Nagamatsu, Barak A. Pearlmutter, Durk Talsma, Gregor Thut, Anne-Laura van Harmelen, Lawrence M. Ward

    • Hardcover $19.75 £14.99