Lisa Gabrielle Mark

Lisa Gabrielle Mark is Director of Publications at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

  • Prints

    Prints

    Jennifer Bornstein and Lisa Gabrielle Mark

    Prints by Jennifer Bornstein gathers together a body of work encompassing her latest projects in printmaking during a recent fellowship at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. These works are contextualized by earlier projects in drawing, film, and artist books that span the 1990s to the present. Known for her conceptual approach, Bornstein's current works centering around prints and frottages weave together intricate background stories of family relations, feminist history, and material possession that are inscribed in wry yet complex understandings of technological presence and material trace. Generously illustrated with detailed images, the book also features an essay by Gloria Sutton and an interview between Bornstein and artist Matt Saunders.

    Copublished with Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

    Contributors Gloria Sutton; interview by Matt Saunders

    • Paperback $34.00
  • Martin Kippenberger

    Martin Kippenberger

    The Problem Perspective

    Ann Goldstein and Lisa Gabrielle Mark

    Works spanning the legendary and prolific artist's twenty-year career, including many of his self-portraits, paintings, sculptures, works on paper, installations, and exhibition posters.

    Martin Kippenberger (1953-1997) is a special case in art. His life and works were inextricably linked in a remarkable practice that centered on the role of the artist within both the culture and the system of art. With his larger-than-life persona, Kippenberger cast himself as impresario, entertainer, curator, bohemian, collector, architect, and publisher. He collected art, set up clothing companies and nightclubs, and ran art-world scams. Nothing was sacred to this iconoclast except the right to satisfy his enormous appetite for life, appropriate anything for his art, and create continual chaos around himself. This book, which accompanies the first major U.S. retrospective exhibition of Kippenberger's work, at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, documents Kippenberger's extraordinary twenty-year career with works in many media—paintings, sculptures, works on paper, installations, photographs, collaborations with other artists, posters, postcards, books, and music. Among the major works reproduced are key selections from the I.N.P. Bilder (Is Not Embarrassing Pictures) and No Problem paintings of the 1980s; the landmark 1987 exhibition of sculpture “Peter. Die russische Stellung” (“Peter. The Russian Position”); self-portraits in a variety of media; Laterne an Betrunkene (Street Lamp for Drunks); the Raft of the Medusa cycle of the 1990s; the renowned Hotel drawings; and the monumental installation, The Happy End of Franz Kafka's “Amerika.” Accompanying the artworks is an essay by exhibition curator Ann Goldstein; newly commissioned texts by art historian Pamela Lee, Kippenberger scholar Diedrich Diederichsen, and curator Ann Temkin; reprinted excerpts from a 1991 interview with Kippenberger by artist Jutta Koether; and an illustrated exhibition history, chronology, and bibliography Martin Kippenberger: The Problem Perspective offers readers the most comprehensive view yet of this legendary artist's body of work.

    • Hardcover $44.95
  • WACK!

    WACK!

    Art and the Feminist Revolution

    Cornelia Butler and Lisa Gabrielle Mark

    Groundbreaking art from a revolutionary era, featuring work by more than 120 international artists, from Louise Bourgeois and Yoko Ono to Martha Rosler, Marina Abramović, and Cindy Sherman.

    There had never been art like the art produced by women artists in the 1970s, and there has never been a book with the ambition and scope of this one about that groundbreaking era. WACK! documents and illustrates the impact of the feminist revolution on art made between 1965 and 1980, featuring pioneering and influential works by artists who came of age during that period, Chantal Akerman, Lynda Benglis, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Valie Export, Mary Heilmann, Sanja Iveković, Ana Mendieta, Annette Messager, and others, as well as important works made in those years by artists whose careers were already well established, including Louise Bourgeois, Judy Chicago, Sheila Levrant de Bretteville, Lucy Lippard, Alice Neel, and Yoko Ono.

    The art surveyed in WACK! includes work by more than 120 artists, in all media, from painting and sculpture to photography, film, installation, and video, arranged not by chronology but by theme: Abstraction, "Autophotography," Body as Medium, Family Stories, Gender Performance, Knowledge as Power, Making Art History, and others. WACK!, which accompanies the first international museum exhibition to showcase feminist art from this revolutionary era, contains more than 400 color images. Highlights include the figurative paintings of Joan Semmel; the performance and film collaborations of Sally Potter and Rose English; the untitled film stills of Cindy Sherman; and the large-scale, craft-based sculptures of Magdalena Abakanowicz.

    Written entries on each artist offer key biographical and descriptive information and accompanying essays by leading critics, art historians, and scholars offer new perspectives on feminist art practice. The topics, including the relationship between American and European feminism, feminism and New York abstraction, and mapping a global feminism, provide a broad social context for the artworks themselves. WACK! is both a definitive visual record and a long-awaited history of one of the most important artistic movements of the twentieth century.

    Essays by: Cornelia Butler, Judith Russi Kirshner, Catherine Lord, Marsha Meskimmon, Richard Meyer, Helen Molesworth, Peggy Phelan, Nelly Richard, Valerie Smith, Abigail Solomon-Godeau, Jenni Sorkin

    Artists include: Marina Abramović, Chantal Akerman, Lynda Benglis, Dara Birnbaum, Louise Bourgeois, Judy Chicago, Lygia Clark, Jay DeFeo, Mary Beth Edelson, Valie Export, Barbara Hammer, Susan Hiller, Joan Jonas, Mary Kelly, Maria Lassnig, Linda Montano, Alice Neel, Senga Nengudi, Lorraine O'Grady, Pauline Oliveros, Yoko Ono, Orlan, Howardena Pindell, Yvonne Rainer, Faith Ringgold, Ketty La Rocca, Ulrike Rosenbach, Martha Rosler, Betye Saar, Miriam Schapiro, Carolee Schneemann, Cindy Sherman, Hannah Wilke

    • Hardcover $62.95 £38.95
  • Ecstasy

    Ecstasy

    In and About Altered States

    Lisa Gabrielle Mark and Paul Schimmel

    Another landmark catalog from LA MoCA, featuring recent works by contemporary artists that experiment with alternative modes of perception, creating a heightened sensory experience for the viewer.

    Ecstasy acts as an intersection in which structures of human consciousness meet a range of contemporary art practices. Each work in Ecstasy, which accompanies an exhibition at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, enacts its own particular intervention into human consciousness—surprising us, questioning familiar realities, and suggesting alternative ways of ordering experience—through installation, painting, sculpture, and new media.Ecstasy traces two lines of contemporary inquiry into surrealism's fixation with altered states of consciousness. One follows the tradition of artists attempting to capture metaphysical conditions in representational form—as seen in the wall-scale, resin-suspended pill paintings of Fred Tomaselli; Charles Ray's photographic self portrait, Yes, which depicts the artist on LSD; and Franz Ackermann's recent Mental Maps, abstract paintings that represent cities using his own subjective form of GPS. The other trajectory explores the notion of phenomenological experience through works that play on disjunctions in scale, or disrupt our means for spatial orientation. In Carsten Holler's Upside Down Mushroom Room, for example, the ceiling and floor appear to change places, while in Jeppe Hein's Moving Walls, museum walls begin to close in on the viewer. The 2,200 hand-painted polymer psilocybin mushrooms of Roxy Paine's Psilocybe Cubensis Field, meanwhile, suggests other possibilities for altering our sense of reality.These and the other bold and imaginative works in Ecstasy challenge conventional notions of interactivity while creating a heightened sensory experience for the viewer. Six essays accompany the artworks, considering such topics as the relationship of altered states to art-making, both as the manifestation of the artist's state of mind and as an experiential effect created for the viewer; drugs and the process of self-observation in literary works; and the "dark side" of altered consciousness. Distributed for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

    • Hardcover $39.95 £27.95
  • A Minimal Future?

    A Minimal Future?

    Art as Object 1958–1968

    Ann Goldstein and Lisa Gabrielle Mark

    How Minimalism redefined the art object, featuring work by key artists and a reexamination of Minimalism by prominent art historians, critics, and scholars.

    As a new movement that arose in the 1950s and 1960s, Minimalism challenged traditional ideas about art-making and the art object. A Minimal Future? Art As Object 1958-1968, which accompanies a major exhibition at The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, offers a redefinition of Minimalism by situating it in the context of the concurrent aesthetics of modernist abstraction, pop art, and nascent ideas of conceptual art. Minimalism is presented as a range of strategies that propelled new definitions of the structure, form, material, image, and production of the art object and renegotiated its relationship to space and to the spectator.Focusing on the years 1958-1968, A Minimal Future? presents key works within the framework of a scholarly re-examination of minimal art's emergence and historical context. It reflects the early transitional period that begins in the late 1950s, through the so-called "canonization" of Minimalism by 1968, with an emphasis on work produced in the mid-to-late 1960s.

    The book includes works from the late 1950s through the late 1960s by 40 artists, including Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Jo Baer, Larry Bell, Mel Bochner, Judy Chicago, Dan Flavin, Robert Grosvenor, Eva Hesse, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, Agnes Martin, John McCracken, Robert Ryman, Frank Stella, Anne Truitt, and Lawrence Weiner that reflect the shifting object status of painting and sculpture.The text features original essays by prominent art historians and scholars. Diedrich Diedrichsen addresses the relationship between minimal art and music; Jonathan Flatley focuses on Donald Judd and Andy Warhol; Timothy Martin considers perfomance in relation to minimal art; James Meyer examines East and West Coast practices of Minimalism; and Anne Rorimer discusses the relationship of minimal to conceptual art. Exhibition curator Ann Goldstein contributes an introduction. Also included are individual entries on each of the artists, an extensive bibliography, and an exhibition chronology. The 400-page book includes 300 images, most in color.

    • Hardcover $58.00 £39.95