Mai Abu ElDahab

  • These are the tools of the present

    These are the tools of the present

    Beirut Cairo

    Mai Abu ElDahab, November Paynter, and Marnie Slater

    This publication comprises a series of interviews with contemporary artists, musicians, and writers who are in dialogue with Beirut and Cairo. While not purporting to be an overview of the art scenes in these cities, this book begins to draw a picture of how artists think about what it means to be active in the contexts of these cities. It offers insight into the circumstances that structured these artists' stories, and the often accidental influences that have shaped how their practices have developed.

    These are the tools of the present is published on the occasion of Meeting Points 8, “Both Sides of the Curtain.” Meeting Points is an international multidisciplinary contemporary arts event that takes the Arab world as a starting point to pose questions about art. Meeting Points tries to imagine and interrogate models for the production and presentation of contemporary art, developed through curatorial research in the Arab world.

    Copublished with Mophradat

    ContributorsLawrence Abu Hamdan, Haig Aivazian, Mounira Al Solh, Doa Aly, Andeel, Mirene Arsanios, Malak Helmy, Iman Issa, Mahmoud Khaled, Maurice Louca, Jasmina Metwaly, Joe Namy, Nile Sunset Annex, November Paynter, Roy Samaha, Sharif Sehnaoui, Rania Stephan, Christophe Wavelet, Lauren Wetmore

    • Paperback $19.95
  • Final Vocabulary

    Final Vocabulary

    Mai Abu ElDahab

    Five essays that take an intimate look at what language's role is in moments of dramatic change, and how to find meaning for artistic practices in these transformative conditions. Taking its cue from the aftermath of the events of the Egyptian Revolution in 2011, Final Vocabulary doesn't provide answers as much as it captures the spirit of the moment of searching in which the writers find themselves. The book was developed out of a live conversation at an event called “The Informal Meeting” that took place in Leuven in January 2015, where participants were asked: Our histories and references are often in a different language (abstract or actual) than we use ourselves, what tools do you think are or might be useful to help you trust your own memories and narratives? What, if anything, do you think we might borrow from art to experiment with language in different situations? In English and Arabic.

    Copublished with Mophradat

    ContributorsFederica Bueti, Malak Helmy, Francis McKee, Haytham El Wardany, Brian Kuan Wood

    • Paperback $12.00
  • After Berkeley

    After Berkeley

    Objectif Exhibitions, 2010–2011

    Mai Abu ElDahab

    Following From Berkeley to Berkeley: Objectif Exhibitions, 2008–2010, this publication is the second in a two-part series of interviews with artists who exhibited at Objectif Exhibitions, Antwerp, between 2010 and 2011. The interviews are accompanied by a collection of secondary and parallel material produced in collaboration with each artist.

    After Berkeley opens with a letter from Mai Abu ElDahab addressed to the book's designer, Will Holder, about parallels between their project and Roberto Bolaño's book The Savage Detectives. It and proceeds through a series of conversations revealing the references, methods, and interests of the participants at Objectif Exhibitions ranging from reticence and possession in artistic production to a historical account of so-called carrot jokes.

    ContributorsInterviews: Matias Faldbakken by Nikki Columbus, Will Holder by Richard Birkett, Sophie Nys by Dieter Roelstraete, Clifford Irving by Francis McKee, Patricia Esquivias by Jonas Žakaitis, Norma Jeane and Tim Etchells by Anna Colin, Michael Portnoy by Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, Hassan Khan by Brian Kuan Wood, Barbara Visser by Raimundas Malašauskas; and contributions by Mai Abu ElDahab and Dexter Sinister

    • Paperback $25.00
  • From Berkeley to Berkeley

    From Berkeley to Berkeley

    Objectif Exhibitions, 2008–2010

    Mai Abu ElDahab

    The publication includes a series of interviews with artists who exhibited at Objectif Exhibitions, Antwerp, over a two-year period, along with a collection of secondary and parallel material produced in collaboration with each artist. Ranging from the humorous to the pseudo-scientific, the artists discuss the methods by which their research is transformed into practice. Both the artists and the interviewers constitute a community of active and concerned arts practitioners who, through art-making, writing, curation and teaching, deal with issues of representation, behavioral patterns and historical legacy.

    Co-published with Objectif Exhibitions

    ContributorsInterviews: Mai Abu ElDahab by Will Holder, Guy Ben-Ner by Jan Verwoert, Mariana Castillo Deball by Giovanni Carmine, Sancho Silva by Luca Cerizza, Michael Smith by Larissa Harris, Yael Davids by Frédérique Bergholtz, Mark Aerial Waller by Mike Sperlinger, Anne Daems by Ronald Van de Sompel, Chris Evans by Francesco Manacorda, Antonio Ortega by David G. Torres, Sharon Hayes by Roger Cook, Christian Jankowski by Raimundas Malašauskas, Michael Stevenson by Esperanza Rosales; glossary by Dexter Sinister

    • Paperback $25.00
  • Circular Facts

    Circular Facts

    Mai Abu ElDahab, Binna Choi, and Emily Pethick

    Circular Facts is a collaborative endeavor between three European contemporary art organizations: Casco – Office for Art, Design and Theory, Utrecht; Objectif Exhibitions, Antwerp; and The Showroom, London, in partnership with Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen and Electric Palm Tree. The project acted as an informal think tank and a mutual support structure for the production and dissemination of artistic projects, and has culminated in an eponymous publication. The publication aims to gather a spectrum of perspectives to explore the roles of specific initiatives within their particular localities. The contributors have produced works that speak to their experiences within arts institutions, collaborative curatorial initiatives, and research networks, expanding on the relationship between institutions and artists, markets, local and international audiences, and current political climates.

    ContributorsMai Abu ElDahab, Binna Choi, Emily Pethick, Heejin Kim, Anthony Huberman, Will Bradley, Miren Jaio and Leire Veraga, Anna Colin and Melanie Boutaloup, and Gabi Ngcobo; and an interview with Kim Einarsson.

    • Paperback $19.95