Margaret A. Boden

Margaret A. Boden is Research Professor of Cognitive Science at the University of Sussex. She is the author of Artificial Intelligence and Natural Man, expanded second edition (MIT Press), AI: Its Nature and Future, The Creative Mind, and other books. She was the 2018 recipient of the ACM-AAAI Allen Newell Award for contributions to the philosophy of cognitive science.

  • From Fingers to Digits

    An Artificial Aesthetic

    Margaret A. Boden and Ernest A. Edmonds

    Essays on computer art and its relation to more traditional art, by a pioneering practitioner and a philosopher of artificial intelligence.

    In From Fingers to Digits, a practicing artist and a philosopher examine computer art and how it has been both accepted and rejected by the mainstream art world. In a series of essays, Margaret Boden, a philosopher and expert in artificial intelligence, and Ernest Edmonds, a pioneering and internationally recognized computer artist, grapple with key questions about the aesthetics of computer art. Other modern technologies—photography and film—have been accepted by critics as ways of doing art. Does the use of computers compromise computer art's aesthetic credentials in ways that the use of cameras does not? Is writing a computer program equivalent to painting with a brush?

    Essays by Boden identify types of computer art, describe the study of creativity in AI, and explore links between computer art and traditional views in philosophical aesthetics. Essays by Edmonds offer a practitioner's perspective, considering, among other things, how the experience of creating computer art compares to that of traditional art making. Finally, the book presents interviews in which contemporary computer artists offer a wide range of comments on the issues raised in Boden's and Edmonds's essays.

    • Hardcover $50.00 £40.00
  • Dimensions of Creativity

    Dimensions of Creativity

    Margaret A. Boden

    Dimensions of Creativity brings together original articles that draw on a range of discipline—from the history and sociology of science, psychology, philosophy, and artificial intelligence—to ask how creative ideas arise, and whether creativity can be objectively defined and measured.

    Dimensions of Creativity brings together original articles that draw on a range of disciplines—from the history and sociology of science, psychology, philosophy, and artificial intelligence—to ask how creative ideas arise, and whether creativity can be objectively defined and measured.

    Margaret Boden and her colleagues Simon Schaffer, Gerd Gigerenzer, David N. Perkins, Howard Gardner, Colin Martindale, and Hans J. Eysenck demonstrate that creativity requires not only challenging new ideas but their acceptance by some relevant social group. Although some new ideas can arise as novel associations, others are generated by exploiting structural features of an existing conceptual space. Strong motivations often drive the creators and those who evaluate and perpetuate their work.

    The seven essays—although very different—are complementary. The book can serve as an up-to-date introduction to the study of creativity in various disciplines. The many references provide a way into the relevant literature.

    A Bradford Book

    • Hardcover $65.00
    • Paperback $24.00 £18.99
  • Artificial Intelligence in Psychology

    Interdisciplinary Essays

    Margaret A. Boden

    This collection of Margaret Boden's essays written between 1982 and 1988 focuses on the relevance of artificial intelligence to psychology. With her usual clarity and eye for the key role that each discipline plays in the science of the mind, Boden ties the essays together in a thorough synoptic overview. She outlines the various approaches, from Babbage's contributions, through the work of Turing and von Neumann, to the latest theories of parallel processing, and the questions that researchers in AI and psychology must ask to ascertain if there might be a discipline termed computational psychology. Many theoretical psychologists today believe that the science of artificial intelligence can include all of the phenomena generated by the human mind. This functionalist approach views the mind as a representational system and psychology as the study of the various computational processes whereby mental representations are constructed, organized, and interpreted. Disagreements abound, however, about how various psychological phenomena can be explained in computational terms; there is disagreement, too, about which AI concepts and which of the computer­modeling methodologies will prove most useful from the psychologist's point of view. All of these issues are raised and clearly investigated here. The essays include Fashions of Mind; Is Computational Psychology Constructivist? Does Artificial Intelligence Need Artificial Brains? Intentionality and Physical Systems; Escaping from the Chinese Room; Is Equilibration Important? Artificial Intelligence and Biological Intelligence. Educational Implications of Artificial Intelligence.

    Artificial Intelligence in Psychology is included in the series Explorations in Cognitive Science, A Bradford Book

    • Hardcover $28.00
    • Paperback $17.95 £13.99

Contributor

  • Neuroscience of Creativity

    Neuroscience of Creativity

    Oshin Vartanian, Adam S. Bristol, and James C. Kaufman

    Experts describe current perspectives and experimental approaches to understanding the neural bases of creativity.

    This volume offers a comprehensive overview of the latest neuroscientific approaches to the scientific study of creativity. In chapters that progress logically from neurobiological fundamentals to systems neuroscience and neuroimaging, leading scholars describe the latest theoretical, genetic, structural, clinical, functional, and applied research on the neural bases of creativity. The treatment is both broad and in depth, offering a range of neuroscientific perspectives with detailed coverage by experts in each area. The contributors discuss such issues as the heritability of creativity; creativity in patients with brain damage, neurodegenerative conditions, and mental illness; clinical interventions and the relationship between psychopathology and creativity; neuroimaging studies of intelligence and creativity; the neuroscientific basis of creativity-enhancing methodologies; and the information-processing challenges of viewing visual art.

    Contributors Baptiste Barbot, Mathias Benedek, David Q. Beversdorf, Aaron P. Blaisdell, Margaret A. Boden, Dorret I. Boomsma, Adam S. Bristol, Shelley Carson, Marleen H. M. de Moor, Andreas Fink, Liane Gabora, Dennis Garlick, Elena L. Grigorenko, Richard J. Haier, Rex E. Jung, James C. Kaufman, Helmut Leder, Kenneth J. Leising, Bruce L. Miller, Apara Ranjan, Mark P. Roeling, W. David Stahlman, Mei Tan, Pablo P. L. Tinio, Oshin Vartanian, Indre V. Viskontas, Dahlia W. Zaidel

    • Hardcover $47.00 £34.95
    • Paperback $37.00 £29.00
  • The Mechanical Mind in History

    The Mechanical Mind in History

    Phil Husbands, Owen Holland, and Michael Wheeler

    Scientists, artists, historians, and philosophers trace the evolution of the idea of intelligent machines, reflecting on the multidisciplinary quest to explain mind scientifically as a wholly mechanical process.

    The idea of intelligent machines has become part of popular culture. But tracing the history of the actual science of machine intelligence reveals a rich network of cross-disciplinary contributions—the unrecognized origins of ideas now central to artificial intelligence, artificial life, cognitive science, and neuroscience. In The Mechanical Mind in History, scientists, artists, historians, and philosophers discuss the multidisciplinary quest to formalize and understand the generation of intelligent behavior in natural and artificial systems as a wholly mechanical process. The contributions illustrate the diverse and interacting notions that chart the evolution of the idea of the mechanical mind. They describe the mechanized mind as, among other things, an analogue system, an organized suite of chemical interactions, a self-organizing electromechanical device, an automated general-purpose information processor, and an integrated collection of symbol manipulating mechanisms. They investigate the views of pivotal figures that range from Descartes and Heidegger to Alan Turing and Charles Babbage, and they emphasize such frequently overlooked areas as British cybernetic and pre-cybernetic thinkers. The volume concludes with the personal insights of five highly influential figures in the field: John Maynard Smith, John Holland, Oliver Selfridge, Horace Barlow, and Jack Cowan.

    Contributors Peter Asaro, Horace Barlow, Andy Beckett, Margaret Boden, Jon Bird, Paul Brown, Seth Bullock, Roberto Cordeschi, Jack Cowan, Ezequiel Di Paolo, Hubert Dreyfus, Andrew Hodges, Owen Holland, Jana Horáková, Philip Husbands, Jozef Kelemen, John Maynard Smith, Donald Michie, Oliver Selfridge, Michael Wheeler

    • Hardcover $9.75 £8.95