Maria Lind

Maria Lind is a curator, writer, and educator based in Stockholm and Berlin. In 2010, Selected Maria Lind Writing was published by Sternberg Press.

  • Red Love

    Red Love

    A Reader on Alexandra Kollontai

    Alexandra Kollontai, Michele Masucci, Maria Lind, and Joanna Warsza

    Revisiting the ideas of a Russian revolutionary and feminist on such topics as sexual politics, free love, and motherhood.

    Alexandra Kollontai was a prominent Russian revolutionary, a commissar of Social Welfare after the October revolution in 1917, and a long-term Soviet ambassador to Sweden. As a cofounder of the Zhenotdel, the “Women's Department” in the communist party, she introduced abortion rights, secularized marriage, and provided paid maternity leave. Kollontai considered “comradely love” to be an important political force, elemental in shaping social bonds beyond the limitations of property relations.

    Red Love stems from a yearlong research by CuratorLab at Konstfack University together with Tensta konsthall, that led up to Dora García's exhibition Red Love and its related public programing. A number of artists and thinkers revisit Kollontai's ideas on the politics of love and their relation to current political, social, and feminist struggles. The publication also includes the biographical play Kollontai from 1977 by distinguished Swedish writer Agneta Pleijel.

    Part critical analysis and part artist book Red Love seeks to address the ongoing relevance of Kollontai's thought, and the increasingly complex sphere of love relations in advanced capitalism. Is there a place for Kollontai's vision of comradely love today and how could it be formed?

    • Paperback $26.00
  • The New Model

    The New Model

    An Inquiry

    Lars Bang Larsen and Maria Lind

    Revisiting a project that concatenated art, research, and urban activism into a visionary hybrid framework.

    For three weeks in October 1968, Stockholm's Moderna Museet was transformed into a sprawling adventure playground that was free to access for all of the city's children. It concatenated art, research, and urban activism into a visionary hybrid framework.

    Half a century later, through a series of seminars, exhibitions, and new artworks, The New Model revisits this utopian intervention, reviving discussions of public participation, children's agency, and shifting ideals of collective being. Curated by Lars Bang Larsen and Maria Lind, these inquiries took place from 2011 to 2015 at and around Tensta konsthall, in one of Stockholm's late-modernist suburbs. Through essays, exhibition documentation, and dialogues with the participating artists—among them Palle Nielsen, Magnus Bärtås, Hito Steyerl, Ane Hjort Guttu, and Dave Hullfish Bailey—this volume charts the evolution of two artistic, curatorial, and institutional experiments.

    Contributions by

    Dave Hullfish Bailey, Magnus Bärtås, Jessica Gogan, Ane Hjort Guttu, Lars Bang Larsen, Gunilla Lundahl, Palle Nielsen, and Hito Steyerl, with an artistic intervention from Metahaven

    • Paperback $26.00
  • Seven Years

    Seven Years

    The Rematerialisation of Art From 2011–2017

    Maria Lind

    Seven years in twenty-first century contemporary art, as seen in a series of columns by curator and writer Maria Lind.

    Seven Years offers a subjective chronicle of contemporary art during the second decade of the twenty-first century, seen through a series of columns by curator, writer, and educator Maria Lind. Writing for the print edition of ArtReview, Lind considers individual artworks and exhibitions and contributes to conversations and debates developing in the art world and beyond. She explores work by Haegue Yang, Hassan Khan, Uglycute, Tania Perez-Cordova, and Walid Raad, among others, and discusses such exhibitions as dOCUMENTA (13), the Sharjah Biennial 12, the 3rd Ural Industrial Biennial, and several editions of the Venice Biennale.

    Lind's writings are accompanied by other texts: artists Goldin+Senneby discuss Lind's materialist approach through the use of the word “hand” in the introduction to the volume; Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy reflects on how writing can affect curatorial work, and vice versa; artist Ahmet Öğüt conducts an imagined interview with Lind; and Philippe Parreno weaves a summary of the years between 2010 and 2018, highlighting the notion of potentiality. A postscript by Lind's fellow curator Joanna Warsza compiles a glossary of the book's key ideas and terms.

    Contributors

    Goldin+Senneby, Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, Ahmet Öğüt, Philippe Parreno, Joanna Warsza

    • Paperback $26.00
  • Art and the F Word

    Art and the F Word

    Reflections on the Browning of Europe

    Maria Lind and What, How & for Whom/WHW

    From 2012 to 2014 a series of contemporary art exhibitions, events, and participatory forums organized by Galerija Nova, Tensta konsthall, and Grazer Kunstverein comprised the project “Beginning as Well as We Can (How Do We Talk about Fascism?).” Focusing on the startling increase of nationalism across Europe—made palpable in manifestations of fascist tendencies and the cult of heritage—the project points to the possibility and power of art to imagine futures that are not irrevocably determined by the present, but are invested with struggles fought here and now.

    Art and the F Word: Reflections on the Browning of Europe, edited by curator Maria Lind and the collective What, How & for Whom/WHW, continues the debate with contributions by cultural critics, curators, and artists, which articulate resistant and constructive possibilities of social and artistic production—investigating the language of politics and philosophy and also popular vocabularies, social contexts, media, science, and aesthetics. The exhibitions featured here, which form an essential part of the overall project, test the potential of aesthetic experience to question reality and upset the ideological complacency and political resignation that lead to a loss of control over the direction of social transformation.

    Copublished with Tensta konsthall and What, How & for Whom/WHW

    Contributors Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Petra Bauer & Sofia Wiberg, Barnabás Bencsik, Boris Buden, Maria Lind and Tensta konsthall, Jelena Vesić, What, How & for Whom/WHW

    • Paperback $27.00
  • Cluster

    Cluster

    Dialectionary

    Binna Choi, Maria Lind, Emily Pethick, and Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez

    Cluster is a network of eight contemporary visual arts organizations that are each located in residential areas situated on the peripheries of European cities, extending to the Middle East with one member in Holon, Israel. Each organization is focused on commissioning, producing, and presenting contemporary art, and the nature of the work is often experimental, process-driven, involves research, is based on working with international and local artists, and often engages with diverse publics on a local level.

    Compiled after a series of meetings in each organization over a period of two years, Cluster: Dialectionary aims to find new ways to position this work and the work of contemporary visual arts organizations more broadly, particularly in relation to wider social, political, and cultural concerns.

    The book includes essays by Andrea Phillips, Mark Fisher and Nina Möntmann, Marion von Osten, and Cluster members. These are accompanied by a series of keywords that are drawn from the practices and experiences of the people who work at, visit, and live with the organizations. They have both been produced within the contexts of the projects that gave rise to them, as well as written especially for the publication. The contributors include Can Altay, Ayreen Anastas and Rene Gabri, Pierre Bal Blanc, Alexandre Baudelot, Ferran Barenblit, Ricardo Basbaum, Binna Choi, Céline Condorelli, Cooperativa Crater Invertido, Eyal Danon, Julien Duc-Maugé, Udi Edelman, Mark Fisher and Nina Möntmann, Daniel Foucard, Dora Garcia, Rebecca Gordon-Nesbitt, Elaine W. HO, Annette Krauss, Bojana Kunst, Maria Lind, Pablo Martinez, Mattin, Sanne Oorthuizen, Marion von Osten, Emily Pethick, Natasa Petresin-Bachelez, Andrea Phillips, Tadej Pogacar, Dimitrina Sevova, Simon Sheikh, Louise Shelley, Steven Ten Thije, Mathilde Villeneuve, and Jason Waite.

    The members of Cluster are: CAC Brétigny, Brétigny-sur-Orge; Casco – Office for Art, Design and Theory, Utrecht; CA2M Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, Madrid; The Israeli Center for Digital Art, Holon; Les Laboratoires d'Aubervilliers, Paris; P74 Center and Gallery, Ljubljana; The Showroom, London; and Tensta konsthall, Stockholm.

    Contributors Can Altay, Ayreen Anastas and Rene Gabri, Ricardo Basbaum, Céline Condorelli, Cooperativa Crater Invertido, Mark Fisher and Nina Möntmann, Daniel Foucard, Rebecca Gordon-Nesbitt, Elaine W. Ho, Annette Krauss, Mattin, Andrea Phillips, Marion von Osten, Dimitrina Sevova, Simon Sheikh, Steven Ten Thije

    • Paperback $16.00
  • Abstraction

    Abstraction

    Maria Lind

    An examination of contemporary art's engagement with three modes of abstraction.

    This anthology reconsiders crucial aspects of abstraction's resurgence in contemporary art, exploring three equally significant strategies explored in current practice: formal abstraction, economic abstraction, and social abstraction. In the 1960s, movements as diverse as Latin American neo-concretism, op art and “eccentric abstraction” disrupted the homogeneity, universality, and rationality associated with abstraction. These modes of abstraction opened up new forms of engagement with the phenomenal world as well as the possibility of diverse readings of the same forms, ranging from formalist and transcendental to socio-economic and conceptual.

    In the 1980s, the writings of Peter Halley, Fredric Jameson, and others considered an increasingly abstracted world in terms of its economic, social, and political conditions—all of which were increasingly manifested through abstract codes or sites of style. Such economic abstraction is primarily addressed in art through subject or theme, but Deleuze and Guattari's notion of art as abstract machine opens up possibilities for art's role in the construction of a new kind of social reality. In more recent art, a third strand of abstraction emerges: a form of social abstraction centered on the strategy of withdrawal. Social abstraction implies stepping aside, a movement away from the mainstream, suggesting the possibilities for art to maneuver within self-organized, withdrawn initiatives in the field of cultural production.

    Artists surveyed include: Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Amilcar de Castro, Paul Cézanne, Lygia Clark, Kajsa Dahlberg, Stephan Dillemuth, Marcel Duchamp, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Günther Förg, Liam Gillick, Ferreira Gullar, Jean Hélion, Eva Hesse, Jakob Jakobsen, Jasper Johns, Donald Judd, Wassily Kandinsky, Sol LeWitt, Piet Mondrian, Bruce Nauman, Hélio Oiticica, Blinky Palermo, Lygia Pape, Mai-Thu Perret, Jackson Pollock, Tobias Rehberger, Bridget Riley, Emily Roysden, Lucas Samaras, Julian Stanczak, Frank Stella, Hito Steyerl, Theo van Doesburg

    Writers include:Alfred H. Barr Jr., Ina Blom, Lynne Cooke, Anthony Davies, Judi Freeman, Peter Halley, Brian Holmes, Joe Houston, Fredric Jameson, Lucy R. Lippard, Sven Lütticken, Nina Möntmann, Gabriel Perez-Barreiro, Catherine Quéloz, Gerald Raunig, Irit Rogoff, Meyer Schapiro, Kirk Varnedoe, Stephan Zepke

    • Paperback $24.95
  • Selected Maria Lind Writing

    Selected Maria Lind Writing

    Maria Lind and Brian Kuan Wood

    Working in a number of contexts and capacities has shown Maria Lind to be a curator who, over time, has engaged in a rethinking of the art institution and the formats and methodologies connected with it, taking art itself as a starting point. Following on the various endgames outlined by institutional critique, Lind has forged paths out of hegemonic institutional regimes precisely by identifying other ways of working through them, from both inside and outside.

    For Lind, writing is integral to her curatorial work. It is where she accounts for her decisions, explains her intention, justifies her interest, toys with new possibilities and develops new ideas, and recognizes historical precedents. It is where the craft of curating, already pointed out towards a public, finds another channel of articulation.

    Selected Maria Lind Writing brings together twenty-two essays selected by Beatrice von Bismarck, Ana Paula Cohen, Liam Gillick, Brian Kuan Wood, and Tirdad Zolghadr.

    The collection of essays spanning from 1997 to 2010 forms a tapestry of Lind's own interweaving interests, but also of those of a panel of readers invited by Lind to project their own concerns onto her corpus of writing. Essays on individual artists, monographic and group exhibitions, funding structures, new contexts and spatial paradigms, together comprise a rare opportunity to swivel a spotlight on its axis back towards a figure who always tries to aim it at what really matters.

    Maria Lind is a curator and writer based in Stockholm. She was the director of the graduate program at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, 2008 to 2010. She was director of Iaspis in Stockholm 2005 to 2007 and from 2002 to 2004 was the director of Kunstverein München. From 1997 to 2001, Lind was curator at Moderna Museet in Stockholm, where she was responsible for Moderna Museet Projekt. She was co-curator of Manifesta 2 in 1998. Lind has contributed widely to magazines and other publications, as well as to numerous exhibition catalogues. She was the 2009 recipient of the Walter Hopps Award for Curatorial Achievement.

    Contributors Beatrice von Bismarck, Ana Paula Cohen, Liam Gillick, Brian Kuan Wood, and Tirdad Zolghadr

    • Paperback $28.00
  • No Is Not an Answer

    No Is Not an Answer

    On the Work of Marie-Louise Ekman

    Tone Hansen and Maria Lind

    No Is Not an Answer is the largest presentation of Marie-Louise Ekman's art ever featured in the form of a book. As one of the most influential artists in Sweden in the postwar period, Ekman was both part of Swedish pop and the rebellious underground in the '60s and '70s. She created a unique body of proto-feminist work, which draws equally from the playful imagination of a young woman and popular culture in the social welfare state. She has directed more than a dozen films, TV series, and plays, and since 2009 she has been the director of the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm.

    The result of a collaboration between Tensta konsthall and the Henie Onstad Kunstsenter and an offshoot of the exhibition “Doing what you want: Marie-Louise Ekman accompanied by Sister Corita Kent, Mladen Stilinović and Martha Wilson,” the publication aims to show the contemporary aspect of Ekman's works and to examine the wider international context surrounding the start of her career.

    • Paperback $34.00
  • Philippe Parreno

    Philippe Parreno

    Maria Lind

    Philippe Parreno is a catalogue that accompanies the fourth exhibition that makes up a retrospective of Parreno's work. Starting at Kunsthalle Zürich, it has since traveled to the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin. This publication focuses on “Philippe Parreno,” an exhibition at the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College. Curated by Maria Lind, the exhibition consists of a selection of Parreno's films and collaborative projects, such as June 8, 1968 (2009), which reinterprets Robert F. Kennedy's funeral train procession; Zidane: A XXIst Century Portrait (2006), a full-length portrait of a soccer player, made in collaboration with Douglas Gordon; Anywhere Out of the World (2000); and No Ghost, Just a Shell (1999-2002), a project by Parreno and Pierre Huyghe, in which they purchased the rights to a Japanese manga character named Annlee. During the exhibition, Annlee's rights will be reconsidered in an imaginary trial. Testimonies will be given by Annlee, Philippe Parreno, Pierre Huyghe, Maria Lind, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Liam Gillick, Claire Bishop, and others. In addition, an intensive program of lectures, seminars, and moderated projects will take place in conjunction with the exhibition. These events, as well as contributing texts by Maria Lind, Tom Eccles, Simon Critchley, Jörn Schaffaff, and several CCS graduate students are concentrated and further elucidated in this catalogue.

    Co-published with CCS Bard, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College

    Contributors Simon Critchley, Tom Eccles, Maria Lind, Christina Linden, Jörn Schafaff

    • Paperback $16.00

Contributor

  • What about Activism?

    What about Activism?

    Steven Henry Madoff

    Curators and thinkers about contemporary art consider how to engage audiences in creative forms of protest and advocacy.

    With the global rise of a politics of shock, driven by nationalist and authoritarian regimes, what paths to resistance and sites of sanctuary can cultural institutions offer? In this book, more than twenty of the world's leading curators and thinkers about contemporary art offer powerful case studies from their own work, along with historical and theoretical perspectives, that point the way for cultural producers everywhere to engage audiences in creative forms of protest and advocacy capable of confronting the fierce political challenges of today and tomorrow.

    Contributors Defne Ayas, Ute Meta Bauer, Nicolas Bourriaud, Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, Joshua Decter, Clémentine Deliss, Irmgard Emmelhainz, Boris Groys, Hou Hanru, Pi Li, Maria Lind, Steven Henry Madoff, Antonia Majaca, Gabi Ngcobo, Hans Ulricht Obrist, Jack Persekian with Alison Ramer, María Belén Saéz de Ibarra, Terry Smith, Nato Thompson, Mick Wilson, Brian Kuan Wood, Tirdad Zolghadr

    • Paperback $26.00
  • The Day I Am Free/Katitzi

    The Day I Am Free/Katitzi

    Lawen Mohtadi and Katarina Taikon

    The work and legacy of a Swedish human rights icon.

    Katarina Taikon was an epoch-changing human rights activist, a prolific writer, and a countercultural icon in Sweden whose writing defined the Roma struggle for equal rights. Active in the 1960s through the 1970s, Taikon faced a Sweden in which the Roma minority was heavily discriminated against, excluded from housing, the education system and the rights of citizenship provided by the welfare state.

    This book tells the story of Taikon's life in three parts: a 2012 biography of Taikon by journalist Lawen Mohtadi;Taikon in her own words, including the first volume of the autobiographical children's book series, Katitzi, in which Taikon writes about her struggle as part of an ethnic minority in Sweden; and an essay, written by curator Maria Lind for an exhibition at Tensta konsthall, that articulates the cultural impact of Katitzi.

    Mohtadi's biography brought renewed attention to Taikon's literary and activist work and inspired a cultural reckoning that named Taikon one of the most important Swedish human rights figures of the twentieth century. The publication of this volume introduces Taikon's work and legacy to readers beyond Sweden.

    • Paperback $25.00
  • Design and Art

    Design and Art

    Alex Coles

    The first anthology to address the rise of the "design-art" phenomenon—the breakdown of boundaries between art and architectural, graphic, or product design begun in the Pop and Minimalist eras.

    This reader in Whitechapel's Documents of Contemporary Art series investigates the interchange between art and design. Since the the Pop and Minimalist eras—as the work of artists ranging from Andy Warhol to Dan Graham demonstrates—the traditional boundaries between art and architectural, graphic, and product design have dissolved in critically significant ways. Design and Art traces the rise of the "design-art" phenomenon through the writings of critics and practitioners active in both fields.The texts include writings by Paul Rand, Hal Foster, Miwon Kwon, and others that set the parameters of the debate; utopian visions, including those of architect Peter Cook and writer Douglas Coupland; project descriptions by artists (among them Tobias Rehberger and Jorge Pardo) juxtaposed with theoretical writings; surveys of group practices by such collectives as N55 and Superflex; and views of the artist as mediator—a role assumed in the past to be the province of the designer—as seen in work by Frederick Kiesler, Ed Ruscha, and others. Finally, a book that doesn't privilege either the art world or the design world but puts them in dialogue with each other.

    Contributors David Bourdon, Peter Cook/Archigram, Douglas Coupland, Kees Dorst, Charles Eames, Experimental Jetset, Vilém Flusser, Hal Foster, Liam Gillick, Dan Graham, Clement Greenberg, Richard Hamilton, Donald Judd, Frederick Kiesler, Miwon Kwon, Maria Lind, M/M, N55, George Nelson, Lucy Orta, Jorge Pardo, Norman Potter, Rick Poynor, Paul Rand, Tobias Rehberger, Ed Ruscha, Joe Scanlan, Mary Anne Staniszewski, Superflex, Manfredo Tafuri, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Paul Virilio, Joep van Lieshout, Andy Warhol, Benjamin Weil, Mark Wigley, Andrea Zittel

    Copublished with Whitechapel Art Gallery, London

    • Paperback $24.95