Mark Aronoff

Mark Aronoff is Chairman of the Linguistics Department at SUNY, Stony Brook and the author of Word Formation in Generative Grammar (MIT Press, 1976).

  • Morphology by Itself

    Morphology by Itself

    Stems and Inflectional Classes

    Mark Aronoff

    Most recent research in generative morphology has avoided the treatment of purely morphological phenomena and has focused instead on interface questions, such as the relation between morphology and syntax or between morphology and phonology. In this monograph Mark Aronoff argues that linguists must consider morphology by itself, not merely as an appendage of syntax and phonology, and that linguistic theory must allow for a separate and autonomous morphological component. Following a general introductory chapter, Aronoff examines two narrow classes of morphological phenomena to make his case: stems and inflectional classes. Concentrating first on Latin verb morphology, he argues that morphological stems are neither syntactic nor phonological units. Next, using data from a number of languages, he underscores the traditional point that the inflectional class of a word is not reducible to its syntactic gender. He then explores in detail the phonologically motivated nominal inflectional class system of two languages of Papua New Guinea (Arapeshand Yimas) and the precise nature of the relation between this system and the corresponding gender system. Finally, drawing on a number of Semitic languages, Aronoff argues that the verb classes of these languages are purely inflectional although they are partly motivated by derivational and syntactic considerations.

    • Hardcover $55.00
    • Paperback $35.00
  • Language Sound and Structure

    Language Sound and Structure

    Mark Aronoff, Richard Oehrle, Frances Kelley, and Bonnie Wilker Stephens

    These eighteen original essays pay tribute to Morris Halle, Institute Professor of Linguistics and Philosophy at MIT. Halle's impact on the study of language has been enormous; he and his students represent a continuous and coherent tradition which is unique in modern linguistics. Although they range from poetry to phonetics, the contributions share the common method of formal phonological analysis which reflects Halle's own work. With the exception of Roman Jakobson, his teacher, all of the contributors are Morris Halle's PhD students.

    Contributors Roman Jakobson, Samuel J. Keyser, Paul Kiparsky, Sanford A. Schane, Arnold M. Zwicky, James W. Harris, Stephen R. Anderson, Elisabeth Selkirk, William R. Leben, Shosuke Haraguchi, Mark Liberman, Janet Pierrehumbert, Alan S. Prince, John Goldsmith, Jill Carrier Duncan, Joan Mascaro, John J. McCarthy, Bruce Hayes, Rochelle Lieber, and Moira Yip

    • Hardcover $55.00
    • Paperback $45.00

Contributor

  • Hypothesis A / Hypothesis B

    Hypothesis A / Hypothesis B

    Linguistic Explorations in Honor of David M. Perlmutter

    Donna B. Gerdts, John C. Moore, and Maria Polinsky

    Essays reflecting the influence of the versatile linguist David M. Perlmutter, covering topics from theoretical morphology to sign language phonology.

    Anyone who has studied linguistics in the last half-century has been affected by the work of David Perlmutter. One of the era's most versatile linguists, he is perhaps best known as the founder (with Paul Postal) of Relational Grammar, but he has also made contributions to areas ranging from theoretical morphology to sign language phonology. Hypothesis A/Hypothesis B (the title evokes Perlmutter's characteristic style of linguistic argumentation) offers twenty-three essays by Perlmutter's colleagues and former students. Many of the contributions deal with the study of the world's languages (including Indo-European languages, sign language, and languages of the Americas), reflecting the influence of Perlmutter's cross-linguistic research and meticulous analysis of empirical data. Other topics include grammatical relations and their mapping; unaccusatives, impersonals, and the like; complex verbs, complex clauses, and Wh-constructions; and the nature of sign language. Perlmutter, currently Professor Emeritus at the University of California, San Diego, and still actively engaged in the field, opens the volume with the illuminating and entertaining essay, “My Path in Linguistics.”

    Contributors Judith Aissen, Mark Aronoff, Leonard H. Babby, Nicoleta Bateman, J. Albert Bickford, Sandra Chung, William D. Davies, Stanley Dubinsky, Katarzyna Dziwirek, Patrick Farrell, Donald G. Frantz, Donna B. Gerdts, Alice C. Harris, Brian D. Joseph, Géraldine Legendre, Philip S. LeSourd, Joan Maling, Stephen A. Marlett, Diane Lillo-Martin, James McCloskey, Richard P. Meier, Irit Meir, John C. Moore, Carol A. Padden, Maria Polinsky, Eduardo P. Raposo, Richard A. Rhodes, Wendy Sandler, Paul Smolensky, Annie Zaenen

    • Hardcover $70.00
    • Paperback $37.00