Mark M. Jarzombek

Mark Jarzombek is Professor of the History and Theory of Architecture at MIT. He is coauthor of A Global History of Architecture and Architecture of First Societies: A Global Perspective.

  • Designing MIT

    Designing MIT

    Bosworth's New Tech

    Mark M. Jarzombek

    A generously illustrated account of artistic clashes, bureaucratic tangles, and contemporary politics that accompanied the design and building of MIT's Cambridge campus.

    At the end of the nineteenth century, MIT occupied an assortment of laboratories, classrooms, offices, and student facilities scattered across Boston's Back Bay. In 1912, backed by some of the country's leading financiers and industrialists, MIT officials purchased an undeveloped tract of land in Cambridge. Largely on the basis of a recommendation from John D. Rockefeller, Jr., MIT hired the École des Beaux-Arts–trained architect William Welles Bosworth to build and design a new campus.

    Designing MIT is the first book to detail Bosworth's challenges in the planning and construction of MIT's unique Cambridge campus. MIT professor of architecture Mark Jarzombek provides a fascinating sample of the architectural debates of the time. He examines the competing project proposals—including one from Ralph Adams Cram, noted for his gothic West Point campus—and describes how Bosworth found his classically oriented vision challenged by the engineer John Freeman, a proponent of Frederick W. Taylor's new principle of scientific management. Jarzombek shows that their conflict ultimately resulted in a far more innovative design than either of their individual approaches would have produced, one that employed new European concepts of industrialism, efficiency, and aesthetics in academic structures.

    Generously illustrated with images from the MIT archives, the story of Bosworth's new “Tech” offers more than just insight into the planning of a campus. Fraught with artistic clashes, bureaucratic tangles, and contemporary politics, the story of MIT's design sheds light on the academic culture of the early twentieth century, the role of patronage in the world of architecture, and the history of the Beaux-Arts style in the United States.

    • Paperback $25.00 £20.00

Contributor

  • Perspecta 40 "Monster"

    Perspecta 40 "Monster"

    The Yale Architectural Journal

    Marc Guberman, Jacob Reidel, and Frida Rosenberg

    A monster is in our midst, and its name is Architecture.

    Contemporary architecture is in many ways a monstrous thing. It is bigger, more broadly defined, increasingly complicated, more costly, and stylistically and formally heterogeneous—if not downright unhinged. Not only is the scale of the built environment expanding, but so is the territory of the architectural profession itself. A perfect storm of history, technology, economics, politics, and pedagogy has generated a moment in time in which anything seems possible. The results have been at times strange and even frightening.

    Long ago, the birth of an abnormal creature was interpreted as a sign of looming trouble. These monstra—from the Latin monere, “to warn” and monstrare, “to show”—were viewed with both fear and fascination. This fortieth issue of Perspecta—the oldest and most distinguished student-edited architectural journal in America—examines architecture past and present through the lens of the monster. The contributors—a diverse group of scholars, practitioners, and artists—embrace the multitude of meanings this term carries in an attempt to understand how architecture arrived at its present situation and where it may be going. Perspecta 40 represents in itself a kind of monster—a hybrid, jumbled, conflicting amalgamation of work and ideas that looks at the past in new ways and tells of things to come.

    Contributors Philip Bernstein, Mario Carpo, Arindam Dutta, Ed Eigen, Mark Gage, Gensler, Marcelyn Gow and Ulrika Karlsson (servo), Catherine Ingraham, Mark Jarzombek, Terry Kirk, Leon Krier, Greg Lynn, John May, John McMorrough, Colin Montgomery, Guy Nordenson, Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen, Emmanuel Petit, Kevin Roche, Yoshiharu Tsukamoto (Atelier Bow-Wow) and Ryuji Fujimura, Michael Weinstock, Claire Zimmerman

    • Paperback $25.00 £20.00
  • The Artless Word

    The Artless Word

    Mies van der Rohe on the Building Art

    Fritz Neumeyer

    From Mies's library - including his marginal notes - and from a body of writing that is surprisingly large for the self-described "unwilling author," Fritz Neumeyer reconstructs the metaphysical and philosophical inquiry on which Mies based his modernism.

    Mies van der Rohe's architecture has been well documented, yet his writings, which contain the key to understanding his work, have been largely unexplored. From a body of writing that is surprisingly large for the self-described "unwilling author," Fritz Neumeyer reconstructs the metaphysical and philosophical inquiry on which Mies based his modernism. An appendix presents all of the essential texts by Mies, including some that have not previously appeared in English. Of special interest is the manuscript notebook from the Mies van der Rohe Archive in the Museum of Modern Art, New York, dating from the crucial years 1927-28 and published for the first time in this book.

    • Hardcover $55.00
    • Paperback $34.95 £24.95