Michael I. Jordan

Michael I. Jordan is Professor of Computer Science and of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley, and recipient of the ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award.

  • Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems

    Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems

    Proceedings of the First 12 Conferences

    Michael I. Jordan, Yann LeCun, and Sara A. Solla

    The complete twelve-volume proceedings of the Neural Information Processing Systems conferences from 1988 to 1999 on CD-ROM.

    The annual conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) is the flagship conference on neural computation. The conference is interdisciplinary, with contributions in algorithms, learning theory, cognitive science, neuroscience, vision, speech and signal processing, reinforcement learning and control, implementations, and diverse applications. Only about 30 percent of the papers submitted are accepted for presentation at NIPS, so the quality is exceptionally high. This CD-ROM contains the entire proceedings of the twelve Neural Information Processing Systems conferences from 1988 to 1999. The files are available in the DjVu image format developed by Yann LeCun and his group at AT&T Labs. The CD-ROM includes free browsers for all major platforms.

    • CD-ROM $19.75 £15.99
  • Graphical Models

    Graphical Models

    Foundations of Neural Computation

    Michael I. Jordan and Terrence J. Sejnowski

    This book exemplifies the interplay between the general formal framework of graphical models and the exploration of new algorithm and architectures. The selections range from foundational papers of historical importance to results at the cutting edge of research.

    Graphical models use graphs to represent and manipulate joint probability distributions. They have their roots in artificial intelligence, statistics, and neural networks. The clean mathematical formalism of the graphical models framework makes it possible to understand a wide variety of network-based approaches to computation, and in particular to understand many neural network algorithms and architectures as instances of a broader probabilistic methodology. It also makes it possible to identify novel features of neural network algorithms and architectures and to extend them to more general graphical models.This book exemplifies the interplay between the general formal framework of graphical models and the exploration of new algorithms and architectures. The selections range from foundational papers of historical importance to results at the cutting edge of research.

    Contributors H. Attias, C. M. Bishop, B. J. Frey, Z. Ghahramani, D. Heckerman, G. E. Hinton, R. Hofmann, R. A. Jacobs, Michael I. Jordan, H. J. Kappen, A. Krogh, R. Neal, S. K. Riis, F. B. Rodríguez, L. K. Saul, Terrence J. Sejnowski, P. Smyth, M. E. Tipping, V. Tresp, Y. Weiss

    • Paperback $50.00 £40.00
  • Learning in Graphical Models

    Learning in Graphical Models

    Michael I. Jordan

    Graphical models, a marriage between probability theory and graph theory, provide a natural tool for dealing with two problems that occur throughout applied mathematics and engineering—uncertainty and complexity. In particular, they play an increasingly important role in the design and analysis of machine learning algorithms. Fundamental to the idea of a graphical model is the notion of modularity: a complex system is built by combining simpler parts. Probability theory serves as the glue whereby the parts are combined, ensuring that the system as a whole is consistent and providing ways to interface models to data. Graph theory provides both an intuitively appealing interface by which humans can model highly interacting sets of variables and a data structure that lends itself naturally to the design of efficient general-purpose algorithms.

    This book presents an in-depth exploration of issues related to learning within the graphical model formalism. Four chapters are tutorial chapters—Robert Cowell on Inference for Bayesian Networks, David MacKay on Monte Carlo Methods, Michael I. Jordan et al. on Variational Methods, and David Heckerman on Learning with Bayesian Networks. The remaining chapters cover a wide range of topics of current research interest.

    • Paperback $80.00 £65.00
  • Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10

    Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10

    Proceedings of the 1997 Conference

    Michael I. Jordan, Michael J. Kearns, and Sara A. Solla

    The annual conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) is the flagship conference on neural computation. It draws preeminent academic researchers from around the world and is widely considered to be a showcase conference for new developments in network algorithms and architectures. The broad range of interdisciplinary research areas represented includes computer science, neuroscience, statistics, physics, cognitive science, and many branches of engineering, including signal processing and control theory. Only about 30 percent of the papers submitted are accepted for presentation at NIPS, so the quality is exceptionally high. These proceedings contain all of the papers that were presented.

    • Hardcover $20.75 £16.99
  • Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9

    Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9

    Proceedings of The 1996 Conference

    Michael C. Mozer, Michael I. Jordan, and Thomas Petsche

    The annual conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) is the flagship conference on neural computation. It draws preeminent academic researchers from around the world and is widely considered to be a showcase conference for new developments in network algorithms and architectures. The broad range of interdisciplinary research areas represented includes neural networks and genetic algorithms, cognitive science, neuroscience and biology, computer science, AI, applied mathematics, physics, and many branches of engineering. Only about 30% of the papers submitted are accepted for presentation at NIPS, so the quality is exceptionally high. All of the papers presented appear in these proceedings.

    • Hardcover $20.75 £16.99

Contributor

  • Log-Linear Models, Extensions, and Applications

    Log-Linear Models, Extensions, and Applications

    Aleksandr Aravkin, Anna Choromanska, Li Deng, Georg Heigold, Tony Jebara, Dimitri Kanevsky, and Stephen J. Wright

    Advances in training models with log-linear structures, with topics including variable selection, the geometry of neural nets, and applications.

    Log-linear models play a key role in modern big data and machine learning applications. From simple binary classification models through partition functions, conditional random fields, and neural nets, log-linear structure is closely related to performance in certain applications and influences fitting techniques used to train models. This volume covers recent advances in training models with log-linear structures, covering the underlying geometry, optimization techniques, and multiple applications. The first chapter shows readers the inner workings of machine learning, providing insights into the geometry of log-linear and neural net models. The other chapters range from introductory material to optimization techniques to involved use cases. The book, which grew out of a NIPS workshop, is suitable for graduate students doing research in machine learning, in particular deep learning, variable selection, and applications to speech recognition. The contributors come from academia and industry, allowing readers to view the field from both perspectives.

    Contributors Aleksandr Aravkin, Avishy Carmi, Guillermo A. Cecchi, Anna Choromanska, Li Deng, Xinwei Deng, Jean Honorio, Tony Jebara, Huijing Jiang, Dimitri Kanevsky, Brian Kingsbury, Fabrice Lambert, Aurélie C. Lozano, Daniel Moskovich, Yuriy S. Polyakov, Bhuvana Ramabhadran, Irina Rish, Dimitris Samaras, Tara N. Sainath, Hagen Soltau, Serge F. Timashev, Ewout van den Berg

    • Hardcover $75.00 £62.00
  • Perturbations, Optimization, and Statistics

    Perturbations, Optimization, and Statistics

    Tamir Hazan, George Papandreou, and Daniel Tarlow

    A description of perturbation-based methods developed in machine learning to augment novel optimization methods with strong statistical guarantees.

    In nearly all machine learning, decisions must be made given current knowledge. Surprisingly, making what is believed to be the best decision is not always the best strategy, even when learning in a supervised learning setting. An emerging body of work on learning under different rules applies perturbations to decision and learning procedures. These methods provide simple and highly efficient learning rules with improved theoretical guarantees. This book describes perturbation-based methods developed in machine learning to augment novel optimization methods with strong statistical guarantees, offering readers a state-of-the-art overview.

    Chapters address recent modeling ideas that have arisen within the perturbations framework, including Perturb & MAP, herding, and the use of neural networks to map generic noise to distribution over highly structured data. They describe new learning procedures for perturbation models, including an improved EM algorithm and a learning algorithm that aims to match moments of model samples to moments of data. They discuss understanding the relation of perturbation models to their traditional counterparts, with one chapter showing that the perturbations viewpoint can lead to new algorithms in the traditional setting. And they consider perturbation-based regularization in neural networks, offering a more complete understanding of dropout and studying perturbations in the context of deep neural networks.

    • Hardcover $60.00 £50.00
  • Advanced Structured Prediction

    Advanced Structured Prediction

    Sebastian Nowozin, Peter V. Gehler, Jeremy Jancsary, and Christoph H. Lampert

    An overview of recent work in the field of structured prediction, the building of predictive machine learning models for interrelated and dependent outputs.

    The goal of structured prediction is to build machine learning models that predict relational information that itself has structure, such as being composed of multiple interrelated parts. These models, which reflect prior knowledge, task-specific relations, and constraints, are used in fields including computer vision, speech recognition, natural language processing, and computational biology. They can carry out such tasks as predicting a natural language sentence, or segmenting an image into meaningful components.

    These models are expressive and powerful, but exact computation is often intractable. A broad research effort in recent years has aimed at designing structured prediction models and approximate inference and learning procedures that are computationally efficient. This volume offers an overview of this recent research in order to make the work accessible to a broader research community. The chapters, by leading researchers in the field, cover a range of topics, including research trends, the linear programming relaxation approach, innovations in probabilistic modeling, recent theoretical progress, and resource-aware learning.

    Contributors Jonas Behr, Yutian Chen, Fernando De La Torre, Justin Domke, Peter V. Gehler, Andrew E. Gelfand, Sébastien Giguère, Amir Globerson, Fred A. Hamprecht, Minh Hoai, Tommi Jaakkola, Jeremy Jancsary, Joseph Keshet, Marius Kloft, Vladimir Kolmogorov, Christoph H. Lampert, François Laviolette, Xinghua Lou, Mario Marchand, André F. T. Martins, Ofer Meshi, Sebastian Nowozin, George Papandreou, Daniel Průša, Gunnar Rätsch, Amélie Rolland, Bogdan Savchynskyy, Stefan Schmidt, Thomas Schoenemann, Gabriele Schweikert, Ben Taskar, Sinisa Todorovic, Max Welling, David Weiss, Thomáš Werner, Alan Yuille, Stanislav Živný

    • Hardcover $65.00 £55.00
  • Practical Applications of Sparse Modeling

    Practical Applications of Sparse Modeling

    Irina Rish, Guillermo A. Cecchi, Aurelie Lozano, and Alexandru Niculescu-Mizil

    Key approaches in the rapidly developing area of sparse modeling, focusing on its application in fields including neuroscience, computational biology, and computer vision.

    Sparse modeling is a rapidly developing area at the intersection of statistical learning and signal processing, motivated by the age-old statistical problem of selecting a small number of predictive variables in high-dimensional datasets. This collection describes key approaches in sparse modeling, focusing on its applications in fields including neuroscience, computational biology, and computer vision.

    Sparse modeling methods can improve the interpretability of predictive models and aid efficient recovery of high-dimensional unobserved signals from a limited number of measurements. Yet despite significant advances in the field, a number of open issues remain when sparse modeling meets real-life applications. The book discusses a range of practical applications and state-of-the-art approaches for tackling the challenges presented by these applications. Topics considered include the choice of method in genomics applications; analysis of protein mass-spectrometry data; the stability of sparse models in brain imaging applications; sequential testing approaches; algorithmic aspects of sparse recovery; and learning sparse latent models.

    Contributors A. Vania Apkarian, Marwan Baliki, Melissa K. Carroll, Guillermo A. Cecchi, Volkan Cevher, Xi Chen, Nathan W. Churchill, Rémi Emonet, Rahul Garg, Zoubin Ghahramani, Lars Kai Hansen, Matthias Hein, Katherine Heller, Sina Jafarpour, Seyoung Kim, Mladen Kolar, Anastasios Kyrillidis, Seunghak Lee, Aurelie Lozano, Matthew L. Malloy, Pablo Meyer, Shakir Mohamed, Alexandru Niculescu-Mizil, Robert D. Nowak, Jean-Marc Odobez, Peter M. Rasmussen, Irina Rish, Saharon Rosset, Martin Slawski, Stephen C. Strother, Jagannadan Varadarajan, Eric P. Xing

    • Hardcover $19.75 £15.99
  • Optimization for Machine Learning

    Optimization for Machine Learning

    Suvrit Sra, Sebastian Nowozin, and Stephen J. Wright

    An up-to-date account of the interplay between optimization and machine learning, accessible to students and researchers in both communities.

    The interplay between optimization and machine learning is one of the most important developments in modern computational science. Optimization formulations and methods are proving to be vital in designing algorithms to extract essential knowledge from huge volumes of data. Machine learning, however, is not simply a consumer of optimization technology but a rapidly evolving field that is itself generating new optimization ideas. This book captures the state of the art of the interaction between optimization and machine learning in a way that is accessible to researchers in both fields.Optimization approaches have enjoyed prominence in machine learning because of their wide applicability and attractive theoretical properties. The increasing complexity, size, and variety of today's machine learning models call for the reassessment of existing assumptions. This book starts the process of reassessment. It describes the resurgence in novel contexts of established frameworks such as first-order methods, stochastic approximations, convex relaxations, interior-point methods, and proximal methods. It also devotes attention to newer themes such as regularized optimization, robust optimization, gradient and subgradient methods, splitting techniques, and second-order methods. Many of these techniques draw inspiration from other fields, including operations research, theoretical computer science, and subfields of optimization. The book will enrich the ongoing cross-fertilization between the machine learning community and these other fields, and within the broader optimization community.

    • Hardcover $60.00 £50.00
    • Paperback $50.00 £40.00
  • Dataset Shift in Machine Learning

    Dataset Shift in Machine Learning

    Joaquin Quiñonero-Candela, Masashi Sugiyama, Anton Schwaighofer, and Neil D. Lawrence

    An overview of recent efforts in the machine learning community to deal with dataset and covariate shift, which occurs when test and training inputs and outputs have different distributions.

    Dataset shift is a common problem in predictive modeling that occurs when the joint distribution of inputs and outputs differs between training and test stages. Covariate shift, a particular case of dataset shift, occurs when only the input distribution changes. Dataset shift is present in most practical applications, for reasons ranging from the bias introduced by experimental design to the irreproducibility of the testing conditions at training time. (An example is -email spam filtering, which may fail to recognize spam that differs in form from the spam the automatic filter has been built on.) Despite this, and despite the attention given to the apparently similar problems of semi-supervised learning and active learning, dataset shift has received relatively little attention in the machine learning community until recently. This volume offers an overview of current efforts to deal with dataset and covariate shift. The chapters offer a mathematical and philosophical introduction to the problem, place dataset shift in relationship to transfer learning, transduction, local learning, active learning, and semi-supervised learning, provide theoretical views of dataset and covariate shift (including decision theoretic and Bayesian perspectives), and present algorithms for covariate shift.

    Contributors Shai Ben-David, Steffen Bickel, Karsten Borgwardt, Michael Brückner, David Corfield, Amir Globerson, Arthur Gretton, Lars Kai Hansen, Matthias Hein, Jiayuan Huang, Choon Hui Teo, Takafumi Kanamori, Klaus-Robert Müller, Sam Roweis, Neil Rubens, Tobias Scheffer, Marcel Schmittfull, Bernhard Schölkopf Hidetoshi Shimodaira, Alex Smola, Amos Storkey, Masashi Sugiyama

    • Hardcover $45.00 £38.00
  • Learning Machine Translation

    Learning Machine Translation

    Cyril Goutte, Nicola Cancedda, Marc Dymetman, and George Foster

    The Internet gives us access to a wealth of information in languages we don't understand. The investigation of automated or semi-automated approaches to translation has become a thriving research field with enormous commercial potential. This volume investigates how Machine Learning techniques can improve Statistical Machine Translation, currently at the forefront of research in the field. The book looks first at enabling technologies—technologies that solve problems that are not Machine Translation proper but are linked closely to the development of a Machine Translation system. These include the acquisition of bilingual sentence-aligned data from comparable corpora, automatic construction of multilingual name dictionaries, and word alignment. The book then presents new or improved statistical Machine Translation techniques, including a discriminative training framework for leveraging syntactic information, the use of semi-supervised and kernel-based learning methods, and the combination of multiple Machine Translation outputs in order to improve overall translation quality.

    Contributors Srinivas Bangalore, Nicola Cancedda, Josep M. Crego, Marc Dymetman, Jakob Elming, George Foster, Jesús Giménez, Cyril Goutte, Nizar Habash, Gholamreza Haffari, Patrick Haffner, Hitoshi Isahara, Stephan Kanthak, Alexandre Klementiev, Gregor Leusch, Pierre Mahé, Lluís Màrquez, Evgeny Matusov, I. Dan Melamed, Ion Muslea, Hermann Ney, Bruno Pouliquen, Dan Roth, Anoop Sarkar, John Shawe-Taylor, Ralf Steinberger, Joseph Turian, Nicola Ueffing, Masao Utiyama, Zhuoran Wang, Benjamin Wellington, Kenji Yamada

    • Hardcover $10.75 £8.99
  • Large-Scale Kernel Machines

    Large-Scale Kernel Machines

    Léon Bottou, Olivier Chapelle, Dennis DeCoste, and Jason Weston

    Solutions for learning from large scale datasets, including kernel learning algorithms that scale linearly with the volume of the data and experiments carried out on realistically large datasets.

    Pervasive and networked computers have dramatically reduced the cost of collecting and distributing large datasets. In this context, machine learning algorithms that scale poorly could simply become irrelevant. We need learning algorithms that scale linearly with the volume of the data while maintaining enough statistical efficiency to outperform algorithms that simply process a random subset of the data. This volume offers researchers and engineers practical solutions for learning from large scale datasets, with detailed descriptions of algorithms and experiments carried out on realistically large datasets. At the same time it offers researchers information that can address the relative lack of theoretical grounding for many useful algorithms. After a detailed description of state-of-the-art support vector machine technology, an introduction of the essential concepts discussed in the volume, and a comparison of primal and dual optimization techniques, the book progresses from well-understood techniques to more novel and controversial approaches. Many contributors have made their code and data available online for further experimentation. Topics covered include fast implementations of known algorithms, approximations that are amenable to theoretical guarantees, and algorithms that perform well in practice but are difficult to analyze theoretically.

    Contributors Léon Bottou, Yoshua Bengio, Stéphane Canu, Eric Cosatto, Olivier Chapelle, Ronan Collobert, Dennis DeCoste, Ramani Duraiswami, Igor Durdanovic, Hans-Peter Graf, Arthur Gretton, Patrick Haffner, Stefanie Jegelka, Stephan Kanthak, S. Sathiya Keerthi, Yann LeCun, Chih-Jen Lin, Gaëlle Loosli, Joaquin Quiñonero-Candela, Carl Edward Rasmussen, Gunnar Rätsch, Vikas Chandrakant Raykar, Konrad Rieck, Vikas Sindhwani, Fabian Sinz, Sören Sonnenburg, Jason Weston, Christopher K. I. Williams, Elad Yom-Tov

    • Hardcover $19.75 £15.99
  • Predicting Structured Data

    Predicting Structured Data

    Gökhan BakIr, Thomas Hofmann, Bernhard Schölkopf, Alexander J. Smola, Ben Taskar, and S.V.N Vishwanathan

    State-of-the-art algorithms and theory in a novel domain of machine learning, prediction when the output has structure.

    Machine learning develops intelligent computer systems that are able to generalize from previously seen examples. A new domain of machine learning, in which the prediction must satisfy the additional constraints found in structured data, poses one of machine learning's greatest challenges: learning functional dependencies between arbitrary input and output domains. This volume presents and analyzes the state of the art in machine learning algorithms and theory in this novel field. The contributors discuss applications as diverse as machine translation, document markup, computational biology, and information extraction, among others, providing a timely overview of an exciting field.

    Contributors Yasemin Altun, Gökhan Bakir, Olivier Bousquet, Sumit Chopra, Corinna Cortes, Hal Daumé III, Ofer Dekel, Zoubin Ghahramani, Raia Hadsell, Thomas Hofmann, Fu Jie Huang, Yann LeCun, Tobias Mann, Daniel Marcu, David McAllester, Mehryar Mohri, William Stafford Noble, Fernando Pérez-Cruz, Massimiliano Pontil, Marc'Aurelio Ranzato, Juho Rousu, Craig Saunders, Bernhard Schölkopf, Matthias W. Seeger, Shai Shalev-Shwartz, John Shawe-Taylor, Yoram Singer, Alexander J. Smola, Sandor Szedmak, Ben Taskar, Ioannis Tsochantaridis, S.V.N Vishwanathan, Jason Weston

    • Hardcover $47.00 £38.00
    • Paperback $45.00 £38.00
  • Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing

    Toward Brain-Computer Interfacing

    Guido Dornhege, José del R. Millán, Thilo Hinterberger, Dennis J. McFarland, and Klaus-Robert Müller

    The latest research in the development of technologies that will allow humans to communicate, using brain signals only, with computers, wheelchairs, prostheses, and other devices.

    Interest in developing an effective communication interface connecting the human brain and a computer has grown rapidly over the past decade. The brain-computer interface (BCI) would allow humans to operate computers, wheelchairs, prostheses, and other devices, using brain signals only. BCI research may someday provide a communication channel for patients with severe physical disabilities but intact cognitive functions, a working tool in computational neuroscience that contributes to a better understanding of the brain, and a novel independent interface for human-machine communication that offers new options for monitoring and control. This volume presents a timely overview of the latest BCI research, with contributions from many of the important research groups in the field. The book covers a broad range of topics, describing work on both noninvasive (that is, without the implantation of electrodes) and invasive approaches. Other chapters discuss relevant techniques from machine learning and signal processing, existing software for BCI, and possible applications of BCI research in the real world.

    • Hardcover $49.00 £40.00
    • Paperback $60.00 £50.00
  • New Directions in Statistical Signal Processing

    New Directions in Statistical Signal Processing

    From Systems to Brains

    Simon Haykin, Jose C. Principe, Terrence J. Sejnowski, and John McWhirter

    Leading researchers in signal processing and neural computation present work aimed at promoting the interaction and cross-fertilization between the two fields.

    Signal processing and neural computation have separately and significantly influenced many disciplines, but the cross-fertilization of the two fields has begun only recently. Research now shows that each has much to teach the other, as we see highly sophisticated kinds of signal processing and elaborate hierachical levels of neural computation performed side by side in the brain. In New Directions in Statistical Signal Processing, leading researchers from both signal processing and neural computation present new work that aims to promote interaction between the two disciplines.The book's 14 chapters, almost evenly divided between signal processing and neural computation, begin with the brain and move on to communication, signal processing, and learning systems. They examine such topics as how computational models help us understand the brain's information processing, how an intelligent machine could solve the "cocktail party problem" with "active audition" in a noisy environment, graphical and network structure modeling approaches, uncertainty in network communications, the geometric approach to blind signal processing, game-theoretic learning algorithms, and observable operator models (OOMs) as an alternative to hidden Markov models (HMMs).

    • Hardcover $11.75 £9.99
  • Nearest-Neighbor Methods in Learning and Vision

    Nearest-Neighbor Methods in Learning and Vision

    Theory and Practice

    Gregory Shakhnarovich, Trevor Darrell, and Piotr Indyk

    Advances in computational geometry and machine learning that offer new methods for search, regression, and classification with large amounts of high-dimensional data.

    Regression and classification methods based on similarity of the input to stored examples have not been widely used in applications involving very large sets of high-dimensional data. Recent advances in computational geometry and machine learning, however, may alleviate the problems in using these methods on large data sets. This volume presents theoretical and practical discussions of nearest-neighbor (NN) methods in machine learning and examines computer vision as an application domain in which the benefit of these advanced methods is often dramatic. It brings together contributions from researchers in theory of computation, machine learning, and computer vision with the goals of bridging the gaps between disciplines and presenting state-of-the-art methods for emerging applications. The contributors focus on the importance of designing algorithms for NN search, and for the related classification, regression, and retrieval tasks, that remain efficient even as the number of points or the dimensionality of the data grows very large. The book begins with two theoretical chapters on computational geometry and then explores ways to make the NN approach practicable in machine learning applications where the dimensionality of the data and the size of the data sets make the naïve methods for NN search prohibitively expensive. The final chapters describe successful applications of an NN algorithm, locality-sensitive hashing (LSH), to vision tasks.

    • Hardcover $10.75 £8.99
  • Advances in Minimum Description Length

    Advances in Minimum Description Length

    Theory and Applications

    Peter D. Grünwald, Jay Injae Myung, and Mark A. Pitt

    A source book for state-of-the-art MDL, including an extensive tutorial and recent theoretical advances and practical applications in fields ranging from bioinformatics to psychology.

    The process of inductive inference—to infer general laws and principles from particular instances—is the basis of statistical modeling, pattern recognition, and machine learning. The Minimum Descriptive Length (MDL) principle, a powerful method of inductive inference, holds that the best explanation, given a limited set of observed data, is the one that permits the greatest compression of the data—that the more we are able to compress the data, the more we learn about the regularities underlying the data. Advances in Minimum Description Length is a sourcebook that will introduce the scientific community to the foundations of MDL, recent theoretical advances, and practical applications. The book begins with an extensive tutorial on MDL, covering its theoretical underpinnings, practical implications as well as its various interpretations, and its underlying philosophy. The tutorial includes a brief history of MDL—from its roots in the notion of Kolmogorov complexity to the beginning of MDL proper. The book then presents recent theoretical advances, introducing modern MDL methods in a way that is accessible to readers from many different scientific fields. The book concludes with examples of how to apply MDL in research settings that range from bioinformatics and machine learning to psychology.

    • Hardcover $11.75 £9.99
  • Exploratory Analysis and Data Modeling in Functional Neuroimaging

    Exploratory Analysis and Data Modeling in Functional Neuroimaging

    Friedrich T. Sommer and Andrzej Wichert

    An overview of theoretical and computational approaches to neuroimaging.

    Functional imaging tools such as fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging), PET (positron emission tomography), EEG (electro-encephalogram), and MEG (magneto-encephalogram) allow researchers to record activity in the working brain and draw inferences about how the brain functions. This book provides a survey of theoretical and computational approaches to neuroimaging, including inferential, exploratory, and causal methods of data analysis; theories of cerebral function; and biophysical and computational models of neural nets. It also emphasizes the close relationships between different approaches, for example, between causal data analysis and biophysical modeling, and between functional theories and computational models.

    • Hardcover $48.00 £40.00
  • Probabilistic Models of the Brain

    Probabilistic Models of the Brain

    Perception and Neural Function

    Rajesh P.N. Rao, Bruno A. Olshausen, and Michael S. Lewicki

    A survey of probabilistic approaches to modeling and understanding brain function.

    Neurophysiological, neuroanatomical, and brain imaging studies have helped to shed light on how the brain transforms raw sensory information into a form that is useful for goal-directed behavior. A fundamental question that is seldom addressed by these studies, however, is why the brain uses the types of representations it does and what evolutionary advantage, if any, these representations confer. It is difficult to address such questions directly via animal experiments. A promising alternative is to use probabilistic principles such as maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference to derive models of brain function.

    This book surveys some of the current probabilistic approaches to modeling and understanding brain function. Although most of the examples focus on vision, many of the models and techniques are applicable to other modalities as well. The book presents top-down computational models as well as bottom-up neurally motivated models of brain function. The topics covered include Bayesian and information-theoretic models of perception, probabilistic theories of neural coding and spike timing, computational models of lateral and cortico-cortical feedback connections, and the development of receptive field properties from natural signals.

    • Hardcover $58.00 £48.00
    • Paperback $25.00 £20.00
  • Advanced Mean Field Methods

    Advanced Mean Field Methods

    Theory and Practice

    Manfred Opper and David Saad

    This book covers the theoretical foundations of advanced mean field methods, explores the relation between the different approaches, examines the quality of the approximation obtained, and demonstrates their application to various areas of probabilistic modeling.

    A major problem in modern probabilistic modeling is the huge computational complexity involved in typical calculations with multivariate probability distributions when the number of random variables is large. Because exact computations are infeasible in such cases and Monte Carlo sampling techniques may reach their limits, there is a need for methods that allow for efficient approximate computations. One of the simplest approximations is based on the mean field method, which has a long history in statistical physics. The method is widely used, particularly in the growing field of graphical models.

    Researchers from disciplines such as statistical physics, computer science, and mathematical statistics are studying ways to improve this and related methods and are exploring novel application areas. Leading approaches include the variational approach, which goes beyond factorizable distributions to achieve systematic improvements; the TAP (Thouless-Anderson-Palmer) approach, which incorporates correlations by including effective reaction terms in the mean field theory; and the more general methods of graphical models.

    Bringing together ideas and techniques from these diverse disciplines, this book covers the theoretical foundations of advanced mean field methods, explores the relation between the different approaches, examines the quality of the approximation obtained, and demonstrates their application to various areas of probabilistic modeling.

    • Hardcover $11.75 £9.99
  • Advances in Large-Margin Classifiers

    Advances in Large-Margin Classifiers

    Alexander J. Smola, Peter Bartlett, Bernhard Schölkopf, and Dale Schuurmans

    The book provides an overview of recent developments in large margin classifiers, examines connections with other methods (e.g., Bayesian inference), and identifies strengths and weaknesses of the method, as well as directions for future research.

    The concept of large margins is a unifying principle for the analysis of many different approaches to the classification of data from examples, including boosting, mathematical programming, neural networks, and support vector machines. The fact that it is the margin, or confidence level, of a classification—that is, a scale parameter—rather than a raw training error that matters has become a key tool for dealing with classifiers. This book shows how this idea applies to both the theoretical analysis and the design of algorithms. The book provides an overview of recent developments in large margin classifiers, examines connections with other methods (e.g., Bayesian inference), and identifies strengths and weaknesses of the method, as well as directions for future research. Among the contributors are Manfred Opper, Vladimir Vapnik, and Grace Wahba.

    • Hardcover $12.75 £10.99