Michael J. Lewis

Michael J. Lewis is currently Historiographer at the Canadian Centre for Architecture.

  • Drawn from the Source

    Drawn from the Source

    The Travel Sketches of Louis I. Kahn

    Eugene J. Johnson and Michael J. Lewis

    With an essay and site photographs by Ralph Lieberman Louis I. Kahn (1901-1974) was among the most highly regarded twentieth-century architects, yet the relationship of his haunting travel sketches to his work has not been systematically explored until now. Drawn from the Source shows how Kahn's encounters with the great buildings of the past influenced his own architecture, and how monuments such as the Salk Institute and the Kimbell Art Museum employ natural materials and natural light to create a sense of permanence and communal space inspired by buildings far removed in time and place. Drawn from the Source describes Kahn's journeys to Europe and Asia in 1928-1929, 1951, and 1959, culminating in the great pastel sketches that circulated privately among architects and played a large part in the revival of architectural sketching in recent years. Each sketching episode is considered in terms of its contribution to Kahn's later architectural formulations, showing how he worked from his sketches to make that great synthesis of modernism and historical form that distinguishes his work. Kahn's itineraries are vividly reconstructed through surviving watercolor, pastel, and pencil drawings that reveal rapid shifts in style, sometimes week by week, while he developed a way of drawing that reflected his understanding of architectural form. Specially commissioned photographs taken by Ralph Lieberman from the precise viewpoints of the drawings document the variance of the sites from Kahn's selective interpretation of them.

    • Paperback $20.00
  • The Politics of the German Gothic Revival

    The Politics of the German Gothic Revival

    August Reichensperger

    Michael J. Lewis

    Establishes Reichensperger as the major figure in the German neo-Gothic movement, not only through his buildings, but through his writings and manifestos as well.

    Although the contribution of August Reichensperger (1808-1895) to the European Gothic Revival has long been recognized, this is the first modern study of his work. It clearly establishes Reichensperger as the major figure in the German neo-Gothic movement, not only through his buildings, but through his writings and manifestos as well.The Politics of the German Gothic Revival is both a biography and a critical study of a designer and theoretician committed to historical fidelity as opposed to a progressive, developmental view of architecture. Reichensperger insisted on masonry construction and, convinced that Gothic architecture reflected laws of geometric order, was suspicious of architectural experimentation and innovation. His contemporaries were widely influenced by his doctrine as well as his building.Lewis looks at Reichensperger's buildings and ideas in the context of his time, taking up the architect's ties to English Gothic Revival, his activities in the area of architectural education, and the interconnections between Reichensperger's political and architectural ideas and the political, religious, and social institutions of nineteenth-century Germany.

    Michael J. Lewis is currently Historiographer at the Canadian Centre for Architecture.

    • Hardcover $70.00