Michael S. Gazzaniga

Michael S. Gazzaniga is Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Director of the SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Codirector of the Kavli Summer Institute in Cognitive Neuroscience, and editor or coeditor of the five previous editions of The Cognitive Neurosciences (all published by the MIT Press).

  • The Cognitive Neurosciences, Fifth Edition

    The Cognitive Neurosciences, Fifth Edition

    Michael S. Gazzaniga and George R. Mangun

    The fifth edition of a work that defines the field of cognitive neuroscience, with entirely new material that reflects recent advances in the field.

    Each edition of this classic reference has proved to be a benchmark in the developing field of cognitive neuroscience. The fifth edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences continues to chart new directions in the study of the biological underpinnings of complex cognition—the relationship between the structural and physiological mechanisms of the nervous system and the psychological reality of the mind. It offers entirely new material, reflecting recent advances in the field.

    Many of the developments in cognitive neuroscience have been shaped by the introduction of novel tools and methodologies, and a new section is devoted to methods that promise to guide the field into the future—from sophisticated models of causality in brain function to the application of network theory to massive data sets. Another new section treats neuroscience and society, considering some of the moral and political quandaries posed by current neuroscientific methods.

    Other sections describe, among other things, new research that draws on developmental imaging to study the changing structure and function of the brain over the lifespan; progress in establishing increasingly precise models of memory; research that confirms the study of emotion and social cognition as a core area in cognitive neuroscience; and new findings that cast doubt on the so-called neural correlates of consciousness.

    • Hardcover $200.00 £154.00
  • The Cognitive Neurosciences, Fourth Edition

    The Cognitive Neurosciences, Fourth Edition

    Michael S. Gazzaniga

    The fourth edition of the work that defines the field of cognitive neuroscience, offering completely new material.

    Each edition of this classic reference has proved to be a benchmark in the developing field of cognitive neuroscience. The fourth edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences continues to chart new directions in the study of the biologic underpinnings of complex cognition—the relationship between the structural and physiological mechanisms of the nervous system and the psychological reality of the mind. The material in this edition is entirely new, with all chapters written specifically for it.

    Since the publication of the third edition, the field of cognitive neuroscience has made rapid and dramatic advances; fundamental stances are changing and new ideas are emerging. This edition reflects the vibrancy of the field, with research in development and evolution that finds a dynamic growth pattern becoming specific and fixed, and research in plasticity that sees the neuronal systems always changing; exciting new empirical evidence on attention that also verifies many central tenets of longstanding theories; work that shows the boundaries of the motor system pushed further into cognition; memory research that, paradoxically, provides insight into how humans imagine future events; pioneering theoretical and methodological work in vision; new findings on how genes and experience shape the language faculty; new ideas about how the emotional brain develops and operates; and research on consciousness that ranges from a novel mechanism for how the brain generates the baseline activity necessary to sustain conscious experience to a bold theoretical attempt to make the problem of qualia more tractable.

    • Hardcover $39.75 £30.00
  • Methods in Mind

    Methods in Mind

    Carl Senior, Tamara Russell, and Michael S. Gazzaniga

    Experts discuss the wide variety of investigative tools available to cognitive neuroscience, including transcranial magnetic stimulation, neuroscience computation, fMRI, imaging genetics, and neuropharmacology, with particular emphasis on convergence of techniques and innovative uses.

    The evolution of cognitive neuroscience has been spurred by the development of increasingly sophisticated investigative techniques to study human cognition. In Methods in Mind, experts examine the wide variety of tools available to cognitive neuroscientists, paying particular attention to the ways in which different methods can be integrated to strengthen empirical findings and how innovative uses for established techniques can be developed. The book will be a uniquely valuable resource for the researcher seeking to expand his or her repertoire of investigative techniques.

    Each chapter explores a different approach. These include transcranial magnetic stimulation, cognitive neuropsychiatry, lesion studies in nonhuman primates, computational modeling, psychophysiology, single neurons and primate behavior, grid computing, eye movements, fMRI, electroencephalography, imaging genetics, magnetoencephalography, neuropharmacology, and neuroendocrinology. As mandated, authors focus on convergence and innovation in their fields; chapters highlight such cross-method innovations as the use of the fMRI signal to constrain magnetoencephalography, the use of electroencephalography (EEG) to guide rapid transcranial magnetic stimulation at a specific frequency, and the successful integration of neuroimaging and genetic analysis. Computational approaches depend on increased computing power, and one chapter describes the use of distributed or grid computing to analyze massive datasets in cyberspace. Each chapter author is a leading authority in the technique discussed.

    Contributors: Peyman Adjamian, Peter A. Bandettini, Mark Baxter, Anthony S. David, James Dobson, Ian Foster, Michael Gazzaniga, Dietmar G. Heinke, Stephen Hall, John M. Henderson, Glyn W. Humphreys, Andreas Meyer-Lindenburg, Venkata Mattay, Elisabeth A. Murray, Gina Rippon, Tamara Russell, Carl Senior, Philip Shaw, Krish D. Singh, Marc A. Sommer, Lauren Stewart, John D. Van Horn, Jens Voeckler, Vincent Walsh, Daniel R. Weinberger, Michael Wilde, Jeffrey Woodward, Robert H. Wurtz, Eun Young Yoon, Yong Zhao Carl Senior, Tamara Russell and Michael S. Gazzaniga

    • Hardcover $58.00
    • Paperback $47.00 £37.00
  • The Cognitive Neurosciences III, Third Edition

    The Cognitive Neurosciences III, Third Edition

    Michael S. Gazzaniga

    The third edition of a work that defines the field of cognitive neuroscience, with extensive new material including new chapters and new contributors.

    Each edition of this classic reference has proved to be a benchmark in the developing field of cognitive neuroscience. The third edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences continues to chart new directions in the study of the biologic underpinnings of complex cognition—the relationship between the structural and physiological mechanisms of the nervous system and the psychological reality of the mind. Every chapter is new and each section has new participants. Features of the third edition include research that maps biological changes directly to cognitive changes; a new and integrated view of sensory systems and perceptual processes; the presentation of new developments in plasticity; recent research on the cognitive neuroscience of false memory, which reveals the constructive nature of memory retrieval; and new topics in the neuroscientific study of emotion, including the "social brain." The new final section, "Perspectives and New Directions," discusses a wide variety of topics that point toward the future of this vibrant and exciting field.

    • Hardcover $31.75 £26.95
  • The New Cognitive Neurosciences, Second Edition

    The New Cognitive Neurosciences, Second Edition

    Michael S. Gazzaniga

    The first edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences helped to define the field. The second edition reflects the many advances that have taken place-particularly in imaging and recording techniques. From the molecular level up to that of human consciousness, the contributions cover one of the most fascinating areas of science—the relationship between the structural and physiological mechanisms of the brain/nervous system and the psychological reality of mind. The majority of the chapters in this edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences are new, and those from the first edition have been completely rewritten and updated.

    • Hardcover $150.00
  • Conversations in the Cognitive Neurosciences

    Conversations in the Cognitive Neurosciences

    Michael S. Gazzaniga

    Conversations in the Cognitive Neurosciences is a brief, informative yet informal guide to recent developments in the cognitive neurosciences by the scientists who are in the thick of things.

    "Getting a fix on important questions and how to think about them from an experimental point of view is what scientists talk about, sometimes endlessly. It is those conversations that thrill and motivate," observes Michael Gazzaniga. Yet all too often these exciting interactions are lost to students, researchers, and others who are "doing" science. Conversations in the Cognitive Neurosciences brings together a series of interviews with prominent individuals in neuroscience, linguistics, philosophy, and psychology that have appeared over the past few years in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

    The ten interviews are divided into five sections: basic neuroscience approaches to cognition (Floyd Bloom and Mark Raichle), attentional and perceptual processes (Michael I. Posner and William T. Newsome), neural basis of memory (Randy Gallistel and Endel Tulving), language (Steven Pinker and Alfonso Caramazza), and imagery and consciousness (Stephen M. Kosslyn and Daniel C. Dennett).

    A Bradford Book

    • Paperback $20.00 £14.99
  • Perspectives in Memory Research

    Perspectives in Memory Research

    Michael S. Gazzaniga

    Integrates current knowledge about memory from both the brain and cognitive sciences.

    Perspectives in Memory Research integrates current knowledge about memory from both the brain and cognitive sciences. The existing literature on memory is vast, attesting to the longstanding fascination with commitment to ongoing research at all levels and from widely varying points of view. This exciting collection presents new empirical data and theories concerning the formation, the retrieval, and the integration of memory processes and, to some extent, tries to identify how studying memory processes might help augment learning and training procedures.

    The chapters on the neurobiologic approach include one on brain function at the molecular level, by Ira Black; one on structure function considerations in the study of memory in cortical networks, by Gary Lynch; one on basic circuits for cortical organization, by Gordon Shepherd; and one on connectionist models of learning and memory, by Terrence Sejnowski.

    The psychological dimensions are probed by Marta Kutas, who reports on tracking memory capacity in the human brain; William Hirst, who discusses the improvement of memory; and Stephen Kosslyn, who considers imagery in learning.

    Michael Gazzaniga and William Hirst conclude with an essay on present and future memory research and its applications

    A Bradford Book.

    • Hardcover $50.00 £34.95
    • Paperback $25.00 £20.00

Contributor

  • Neuroethics

    Neuroethics

    An Introduction with Readings

    Martha J. Farah

    Explores the ethical, legal, and societal issues arising from brain imaging, psychopharmacology, and other new developments in neuroscience.

    Neuroscience increasingly allows us to explain, predict, and even control aspects of human behavior. The ethical issues that arise from these developments extend beyond the boundaries of conventional bioethics into philosophy of mind, psychology, theology, public policy, and the law. This broader set of concerns is the subject matter of neuroethics. In this book, leading neuroscientist Martha Farah introduces the reader to the key issues of neuroethics, placing them in scientific and cultural context and presenting a carefully chosen set of essays, articles, and excerpts from longer works that explore specific problems in neuroethics from the perspectives of a diverse set of authors. Included are writings by such leading scientists, philosophers, and legal scholars as Carl Elliot, Joshua Greene, Steven Hyman, Peter Kramer, and Elizabeth Phelps. Topics include the ethical dilemmas of cognitive enhancement; issues of personality, memory and identity; the ability of brain imaging to both persuade and reveal; the legal implications of neuroscience; and the many ways in which neuroscience challenges our conception of what it means to be a person.

    Neuroethics is an essential guide to the most intellectually challenging and socially significant issues at the interface of neuroscience and society. Farah's clear writing and well-chosen readings will be appreciated by scientist and humanist alike, and the inclusion of questions for discussion in each section makes the book suitable for classroom use.

    Contributors Zenab Amin, Ofek Bar-Ilan, Richard G. Boire, Philip Campbell, Turhan Canli, Jonathan Cohen, Robert Cook-Degan, Lawrence H. Diller, Carl Elliott, Martha J. Farah, Rod Flower, Kenneth R. Foster, Howard Gardner, Michael Gazzaniga, Jeremy R. Gray, Henry Greely, Joshua Greene, John Harris, Andrea S. Heberlein, Steven E. Hyman, Judy Iles, Eric Kandel, Ronald C. Kessler, Patricia King, Adam J. Kolber, Peter D. Kramer, Daniel D. Langleben, Steven Laureys, Stephen J. Morse, Nancey Murphy, Eric Parens, Sidney Perkowitz, Elizabeth A. Phelps, President's Council on Bioethics, Eric Racine, Barbara Sahakian, Laura A. Thomas, Paul M. Thompson, Stacey A. Tovino, Paul Root Wolpe

    • Hardcover $70.00 £51.95
    • Paperback $45.00 £35.00
  • Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience

    Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience

    Steven Platek, Todd Shackelford, and Julian Keenan

    An essential reference for the new discipline of evolutionary cognitive neuroscience that defines the field's approach of applying evolutionary theory to guide brain-behavior investigations.

    Since Darwin we have known that evolution has shaped all organisms and that biological organs—including the brain and the highly crafted animal nervous system—are subject to the pressures of natural and sexual selection. It is only relatively recently, however, that the cognitive neurosciences have begun to apply evolutionary theory and methods to the study of brain and behavior. This landmark reference documents and defines the emerging field of evolutionary cognitive neuroscience. Chapters by leading researchers demonstrate the power of the evolutionary perspective to yield new data, theory, and insights on the evolution and functional modularity of the brain.

    Evolutionary cognitive neuroscience covers all areas of cognitive neuroscience, from nonhuman brain-behavior relationships to human cognition and consciousness, and each section of Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience addresses a different adaptive problem. After an introductory section that outlines the basic tenets of both theory and methodology of an evolutionarily informed cognitive neuroscience, the book treats neuroanatomy from ontogenetic and phylogenetic perspectives and explores reproduction and kin recognition, spatial cognition and language, and self-awareness and social cognition. Notable findings include a theory to explain the extended ontogenetic and brain development periods of big-brained organisms, fMRI research on the neural correlates of romantic attraction, an evolutionary view of sex differences in spatial cognition, a theory of language evolution that draws on recent research on mirror neurons, and evidence for a rudimentary theory of mind in nonhuman primates. A final section discusses the ethical implications of evolutionary cognitive neuroscience and the future of the field.

    Contributors: C. Davison Ankney, Simon Baron-Cohen, S. Marc Breedlove, William Christiana, Michael Corballis, Robin I. M. Dunbar, Russell Fernald, Helen Fisher, Jonathan Flombaum, Farah Focquaert, Steven J.C. Gaulin, Aaron Goetz, Kevin Guise, Ruben C. Gur, William D. Hopkins, Farzin Irani, Julian Paul Keenan, Michael Kimberly, Stephen Kosslyn, Sarah L. Levin, Lori Marino, David Newlin, Ivan S. Panyavin, Shilpa Patel, Webb Phillips, Steven M. Platek, David Andrew Puts, Katie Rodak, J. Philippe Rushton, Laurie Santos, Todd K. Shackelford, Kyra Singh, Sean T. Stevens, Valerie Stone, Jaime W. Thomson, Gina Volshteyn, Paul Root Wolpe

    • Hardcover $14.75 £11.99
  • Handbook of Functional Neuroimaging of Cognition, Second Edition

    Handbook of Functional Neuroimaging of Cognition, Second Edition

    Roberto Cabeza and Alan Kingstone

    A new edition of the essential resource on using functional neuroimaging techniques to study the neural basis of cognition, revised with the student in mind; thoroughly updated, with new chapters on fMRI physics, skill learning, emotion and social cognition, and other topics.

    This essential resource on neuroimaging provides an accessible and user-friendly introduction to the field written by leading researchers. The book describes theoretical and methodological developments in the use of functional neuroimaging techniques to study the neural basis of cognition, from early scientific efforts to link brain and behavior to the latest applications of fMRI and PET methods. The core of the book covers fMRI and PET studies in specific domains: attention, skill learning, semantic memory, language, episodic memory, working memory, and executive functions. By introducing a technique within the description of a domain, the book offers a clear explanation of the process while highlighting its biological context. The emphasis on readability makes Handbook of Functional Neuroimaging of Cognition ideal for classroom use in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in cognitive neuroscience.

    This second edition has been completely updated to reflect new developments in the field, with existing chapters rewritten and new chapters added to each section. The section on history and methods now includes a chapter on the crucial topic of the physics of functional neuroimaging; the chapters on skill learning and executive functions are new to the domain section; and chapters on childhood development and emotion and social cognition have been added to the section on developmental, social, and clinical applications. The color insert has been increased in size, enhancing the visual display of representative findings.

    Contributors Todd S. Braver, Jeffrey Browndyke, Roberto Cabeza, B.J. Casey, Jody Culham, Clayton E. Curtis, Mark D'Esposito, Sander Daselaar, Lila Davachi, Ian Dobbins, Karl J. Friston, Barry Giesbrecht, Todd C. Handy, Joseph B. Hopfinger, Scott A. Huettel, Irene P. Kan, Alan Kingstone, Eleni Kotsoni, Kevin S. LaBar, George R. Mangun, Gregory McCarthy, Uta Noppeney, Robyn T. Oliver, Elizabeth A. Phelps, Russel A. Poldrack, Cathy J. Price, Marcus E. Raichle, Hannes Ruge, Gaia Scerif, Allen W. Song, Sharon L. Thompson-Schill, Daniel T. Willingham, Richard J.S. Wise

    • Hardcover $80.00 £62.00
  • Handbook of Functional Neuroimaging of Cognition

    Handbook of Functional Neuroimaging of Cognition

    Roberto Cabeza and Alan Kingstone

    With its strong theoretical focus, this book serves as an essential resource on the functional neuroimaging of cognitive processes and on the latest discoveries obtained through positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques. It is organized into three sections. The first covers the history and methods of PET and fMRI, as well as cognitive networks, showing how the brain regions involved in the different cognitive processes interact. The second part, the book's core, covers PET and fMRI findings in specific domains: attention, visual recognition, language, semantic memory, episodic memory, and working memory. The third part covers the effects of aging on brain activity during cognitive performance and also examines research with neuropsychologically impaired patients.

    Contributors Jeffrey Binder, Randy L. Buckner, Roberto Cabeza, Mark D'Esposito, Paul Downing, Russell Epstein, Karl J. Friston, John D.E. Gabrieli, Todd C. Handy, Joseph B. Hopfinger, Nancy Kanwisher, Zoe Kourtzi, Jessica M. Logan, George R. Mangun, Alex Martin, A.R. McIntosh, L. Nyberg, Cathy J. Price, Marcus E. Raichle

    • Hardcover $75.00 £51.95
  • The Two Sides of Perception

    The Two Sides of Perception

    Richard Ivry and Lynn C. Robertson

    Anatomically, the central nervous system looks remarkably symmetrical—from the relatively simple structures of the spinal cord to the extensively convoluted folds of the cerebral hemispheres. At the functional level, however, there are striking differences between the left and right hemispheres. Although popular writings attribute language abilities to the left hemisphere and spatial abilities to the right, differences in hemispheric function appear to be more subtle. According to Ivry and Robertson, asymmetries over a wide range of perceptual tasks reflect a difference in strength rather than kind, with both hemispheres contributing to the performance of complex tasks, whether linguistic or spatial.

    After an historical introduction, the authors offer a cognitive neuroscience perspective on hemispheric specialization in perception. They propose that the two hemispheres differ in how they filter task-relevant sensory information. Building on the idea that the hemispheres construct asymmetric representations, the hypothesis provides a novel account of many laterality effects. A notable feature of the authors' work is their attempt to incorporate hemispheric specialization in vision, audition, music, and language within a common framework. In support of their theory, they review studies involving both healthy and neurologically impaired individuals. They also provide a series of simulations to demonstrate the underlying computational principles of their theory. Their work thus describes both the cognitive and neurological architecture of hemispheric asymmetries in perception.

    • Hardcover $15.75 £11.95
  • The Merging of the Senses

    The Merging of the Senses

    Barry E. Stein and M. Alex Meredith

    Bringing together neural, perceptual, and behavioral studies, The Merging of the Senses provides the first detailed review of how the brain assembles information from different sensory systems in order to produce a coherent view of the external world. Stein and Meredith marshall evidence from a broad array of species to show that interactions among senses are the most ancient scheme of sensory organization, an integrative system reflecting a general plan that supersedes structure and species. Most importantly, they explore what is known about the neural processes by which interactions among the senses take place at the level of the single cell.The authors draw on their own experiments to illustrate how sensory inputs converge (from visual, auditory, and somatosensory modalities, for instance) on individual neurons in different areas of the brain, how these neurons integrate their inputs, the principles by which this integration occurs, and what this may mean for perception and behavior. Neurons in the superior colliculus and cortex are emphasized as models of multiple sensory integrators.

    • Hardcover $55.00 £40.95
    • Paperback $35.00 £27.00
  • Synapses, Circuits and the Beginning of Memory

    Gary Lynch

    This monograph articulates the ways in which neurobiologic discoveries can be interpreted in terms of psychological memory.

    With commentaries by Gordon M. Shepherd, Ira B. Black, and Herbert P. Killackey For years memory research focused on the neuron as the basic element of the brain, but developments in cognitive science now challenge the neurobiologist to understand the function of neural networks, perhaps one of the most difficult problems of the mind. This monograph articulates the ways in which neurobiologic discoveries can be interpreted in terms of psychological memory. The brain mechanisms of learning and memory have been extensively studied by both neuroscientists and psychologists in recent years. Here Gary Lynch outlines the main issues in this dialogue: using the olfactory cortex and related hippocampus as examples, he discusses the physiological and chemical process involved in producing long-term memory and the anatomical organization of the neuronal circuitries in which they are stored. Then, combining these arguments, Lynch arrives at a series of postulates about the dynamics of the formation, association, and recall of memory representations in cortical networks. An evolutionary theme concerning the origins of the hypothesized organizations and processes runs throughout the monograph. Commenting on some of these ideas, Gordon Shepherd (Yale University) takes up the ways particular aspects of cortical cells, the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, can be active in storing information. Ira Black (Cornell University Medical College) discusses the biochemical mutability of individual neurons and how this must be taken into account in modeling the way neural cells support mnemonic processes. A general discussion of cortical morphology and memory is provided by Herbert Killackey (University of California, Irvine).

    Synapses, Circuits, and the Beginnings of Memory inaugurates The Cognitive Science Institute Monographs Series, edited by Michael A. Gazzaniga. A Bradford Book.

    • Hardcover $27.00