Milena Hoegsberg

  • Myths of the Marble

    Myths of the Marble

    Alex Klein and Milena Hoegsberg

    Myths of the Marble documents a group exhibition that took place in 2017 at the Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Norway (HOK) and the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania (ICA). Cocurated by Alex Klein (ICA) and Milena Hoegsberg (HOK), the exhibition reflects upon how the “virtual” has been engaged by contemporary artists as a way to consider the world as a site of possibility and limitation that both permeates physical space and online experience.

    The book features individual profiles of each artist, generously illustrated with images of works spanning painting, sculpture, and installation to video, 16-mm film, and VR technology, as well as exhibition views from both venues. Homay King and Tom Holert each provide essays that meditate upon how virtuality in its various forms offer radical reconfigurations of the body, ecology, and architectural space at a moment when the capacity to depict the world has never been greater, and where reality is itself increasingly articulated as a construction. Rounding out the book is a discussion between artists Cayetano Ferrer, Florian Meisenberg, and Sondra Perry with art historians Iggy Cortez and Marina Isgro, which delves into concepts ranging from the video game “skybox” to the complexities of the “prosthetic.”

    Copublished with the Henie Onstad Kunstsenter and the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania

    Contributors Iggy Cortez, Cayetano Ferrer, Roksana Filipowska, Ane Graff, Milena Hoegsberg, Tom Holert, Charlotte Ickes, Marina Isgro, Rachel de Joode, Homay King, Alex Klein, Ignas Krunglevičius, Chris Marker, Daria Martin, Florian Meisenberg, Shahryar Nashat, Sondra Perry, Jacolby Satterwhite, Susanne M. Winterling

    • Hardcover $38.00
  • Living Labor

    Living Labor

    Milena Hoegsberg and Cora Fisher

    Living Labor considers the increasing subordination of life to work. Despite economic instability, growing income gaps across countries and the rise of a migratory, flexible and underpaid labor force, our commitment to productivity is unflagging. Today, work enlists us to psychologically invest ourselves in a boundaryless work life, which seeks to instrumentalize all of our waking hours. In response to the eroding boundaries between work and life, and against the historic backdrop of the Scandinavian labor movement, the writers gathered in Living Labor propose viable forms of refusal and imagine prospects for a post-work future.

    Copublished with Henie Onstad Kunstsenter

    Contributors Will Bradley, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Carl Cedarström and Peter Fleming, Annette Kamp, Michala Paludan, Olivia Plender and Hester Reeve, Ole Martin Rønning, Kathi Weeks

    • Paperback $19.95
  • 5,000 Feet Is the Best

    5,000 Feet Is the Best

    Omer Fast, Milena Hoegsberg, and Melanie O'Brian

    This publication focuses on a single work of art: 5,000 Feet is the Best (2011) by artist Omer Fast. With this cinematic video work, Fast has entered into a discussion about one of the most pressing issues today, namely drone surveillance and warfare—that is, the use of unmanned planes operated by “pilots” on the ground.

    Produced to accompany exhibitions of Fast's work at Henie Onstad Kunstsenter (HOK) in Oslo (February 9–May 6, 2012) and at the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery in Toronto (September 15–November 25, 2012), this publication aims to bridge the gap between a critical reader and an artist book. Although the respective exhibitions include additional works by Fast, the examination of this single work allows not only for a consideration of his broader practice, but also an extensive examination of the subject of the work.

    Informed by Fast's layering of narrative and documentary material, this book compiles critical analyses of his film by art historians Liz Kotz and T. J. Demos, an article on drones reprinted from the journal Foreign Policy, as well as the artist's research and script materials set alongside film stills. Additionally, an e-mail thread of responses from practitioners active in different fields engages a range of issues pertaining to drone warfare, opening the conversation into a forum on politics, ethics, aesthetics, and human experience.

    Contributors David Rohde; further contributions by Jennifer Allen, Christoph Cox, Céline Condorelli, Simon Critchley, T. J. Demos, Am Johal, Liz Kotz, Tom McCarthy, Marit Paasche, Ed Steck, Karen Brown

    • Hardcover $26.00