Nancy J. Troy

Nancy J. Troy is Chair of the Art History Department at the University of Southern California.

  • Architecture and Cubism

    Architecture and Cubism

    Eve Blau and Nancy J. Troy

    A fundamental tenet of the historiography of modern architecture holds that cubism forged a vital link between avant-garde practices in early twentieth-century painting and architecture. This collection of essays, commissioned by the Canadian Centre for Architecture, takes a close look at that widely accepted but little scrutinized belief. In the first historically focused examination of the issue, the volume returns to the original site of cubist art in pre-World War I Europe and proceeds to examine the historical, theoretical, and socio-political relationships between avant-garde practices in painting, architecture, and other cultural forms, including poetry, landscape, and the decorative arts. The essays look at works produced in France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Czechoslovakia during the early decades of the twentieth century. Together, the essays show that although there were many points of intersection—historical, metaphorical, theoretical, and ideological—between cubism and architecture, there was no simple, direct link between them. Most often the connections between cubist painting and modern architecture were construed analogically, by reference to shared formal qualities such as fragmentation, spatial ambiguity, transparency, and multiplicity; or to techniques used in other media such as film, poetry, and photomontage. Cubist space itself remained two-dimensional; with the exception of Le Cobusiers work, it was never translated into the three dimensions of architecture. Cubism's significance for architecture also remained two-dimensional—a method of representing modern spatial experience through the ordering impulses of art. Copublished with the Canadian Centre for Architecture/CentreCanadien d'Architecture.

    • Hardcover $80.00 £65.00
    • Paperback $19.75 £15.99
  • The De Stijl Environment

    Nancy J. Troy

    The Dutch magazine De Stijl, published from 1917 to 1931, was the focus of a remarkable group of advanced artists and architects who sought to combine their individual talents in collaborative projects that reflected their social and aesthetic ideals. The De Stijl Environment explores the group's approach to exterior and interior spaces and to furniture. It treats such themes as color, abstraction, and the corner, and describes the various collaborative efforts within the movement, in particular, the one that produced the De Stijl environment. Troy traces its evolution from an architecturally defined space to one determined by coloristic design. Among the painters discussed are Piet Mondrian, Theo van Doesburg, Vilmos Huszar, and Bart van der Liek; the architects include Gerrit Rietveld, Rob van't Hoff, Jan Wils, J. J. P Oud, and Cornelius van Eesteren.

    • Hardcover $47.50
    • Paperback $24.95