Natasha Stagg

Natasha Stagg is the author of Surveys: A Novel (Semiotext(e)). Her work has appeared in Artforum, Bookforum, Texte Zur Kunstn+1Spike ArtFlash ArtDazedVVice032c, and other publications.

  • Sleeveless

    Sleeveless

    Fashion, Image, Media, New York 2011–2019

    Natasha Stagg

    Essays and stories on fashion, art, and culture in the New York of the 2010s.

    We were supposed to meet Rose McGowan at Café d'Alsace after the party, but she cancelled at the last minute. I saw on Twitter that she had been hit with a drug possession charge, which she insisted was a scheme to keep her Weinstein dirt quiet. I hadn't even read her Weinstein story… I still wanted to know that the articles were being published, and in large quantities, but reading stories of abuse and humiliation was as stupefying as a hangover. I didn't feel empowered; I only felt more hopeless. I wanted to watch the patriarchy go up in flames, but I wasn't excited about what was being pitched to replace it. If we got all of it out in the open, what would we have left? My fear was that guilt would destroy the classics and there'd be no one left to fuck. All movies would be as low-budget and as puritanical as the stuff they play on Lifetime, all of New York would look like a Target ad, every book or article would be a cathartic tell-all, and I'd be sexually frustrated but too ashamed to hook up with assholes, or even to watch porn.—from Sleeveless

    Eve Babitz meets Roland Barthes in Sleeveless, Natasha Stagg's follow up to Surveys, her 2016 novel about internet fame. Composed of essays and stories commissioned by fashion, art, and culture magazines, Sleeveless is a scathing and sensitive report from New York in the 2010s. During those years, Stagg worked as an editor for V magazine and as a consultant, creating copy for fashion brands. Through these jobs, she met and interviewed countless industry luminaries, celebrities, and artists, and learned about the quickly evolving strategies of branding. In Sleeveless, she exposes the mechanics of personal identity and its monetization that propelled the narrator of Surveys from a mall job in Tucson to international travel and internet fame.

    • Paperback $16.95 £13.99
  • Surveys

    Surveys

    A Novel

    Natasha Stagg

    A bored twenty-three-year-old woman suddenly leaves her dull suburban job for L.A., becomes Internet-famous, and falls in love—Zelda to a semi-famous Scott.

    One day, I was not famous, the next day, I was almost famous and the temptation to go wide with that and reject my past was too great. When I was legit famous, it was hard to tell when the change had occurred... If I had been born famous, the moment I would have started engaging in social media, I would have seen this fame, not the rise of it. But first I saw the low numbers, and later, the high ones. —from Surveys

    Wryly mirroring the classic, female coming-of-age narrative, Natasha Stagg's debut traces a few months in the life of Colleen, a twenty-three-year-old woman with almost no attachments or aspirations for her life. Working at an unsatisfying mall job in Tucson, Colleen sleepwalks through depressing office politics and tiresome one-night stands in a desultory way, becoming fully alive only at night when she's online. Colleen attains ambiguous Internet stardom when she's discovered by Jim, a semi-famous icon of masculinity and reclusiveness.

    When Colleen quits her job and moves to meet Jim in Los Angeles, she immediately falls in love and begins a new life of whirlwind parties and sponsored events. The pair's relationship, launched online, makes them the Scott and Zelda of their generation, and they tour the country, cashing in on the buzz surrounding their romance. But as their fame expands, Colleen's jealousy grows obsessive.

    • Paperback $15.95 £12.99

Contributor

  • Intersubjectivity, Volume 2

    Intersubjectivity, Volume 2

    Scripting the Human

    Lou Cantor and Katherine Rochester

    Intersubjectivity considered as both historical phenomenon and nascent mode of present-day relation.

    This collection of essays considers the relationship between performance, subjectivity, and human agency. Encompassing both historical and speculative perspectives, this book explores the ways in which nonhuman (or trans/post-human) entities complicate notions of subjectivity and exert intersubjective pressures of their own on social, political, scientific, and philosophical discourses. Ranging from continental philosophy to more recent formulations that derive from systems theory, trans identity, and the emergent field of bot pedagogy, It approaches intersubjectivity as both historical phenomenon and nascent mode of present-day relation.

    Contributions by Anselm Franke, Avram Alpert, Boris Groys, Erika Landström, Goshka Macuga, Hannah Black, Harry Burke, Jeanne Vaccaro, Josh Kline, Lucky Dragons, Mashinka Firunts Hakopian, Natasha Stagg, Sarah Harrison, Victoria Ivanova

    • Paperback $22.00