Nikolaus Hirsch

  • DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY

    DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY

    Nikolaus Hirsch, Antto Melasniemi, Michel Müller, and Rirkrit Tiravanija

    Published in conjunction with the eponymous installation at Art Basel 2015, DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY is an extension of the collaboration between artist Rirkrit Tiravanija, architects Nikolaus Hirsch and Michel Müller, and chef Antto Melasniemi. Designed by Hirsch and Müller as an outdoor shelter, the installation, made of modular bamboo and steel, welcomes visitors to engage in discussions while participating in the convivial atmosphere of shared food. This supplemental publication includes interviews, texts, images, and poems that illuminate the installation's properties of self-sufficiency and how it was conceived as a new component of Tiravanija and Kamin Lertchaiprasert's ongoing project “the land,” a self-sustaining artistic community near Chiang Mai, Thailand. At the end of the festival, the structure will be transported to Thailand and will be the first building block of a new workshop on the land.

    In a continuation of conversations among artists surrounding the land, this book explores urbanization in a post-rural condition, the act of building as a collaborative process, and land as a concept that can exist outside of ownership. A discussion with Hirsch, Tiravanija, Melasniemi, and Jörn Schafaff reflects on the way in which the installation builds on the land's objectives relating to improvisation, collaboration, and the questioning of institutional structures. Also featured in the book are recipes developed by Melasniemi on the occasion of this installation-as-workshop, where the public is invited to participate in the cooking process.

    DO WE DREAM UNDER THE SAME SKY is a project by Rirkrit Tiravanija, Nikolaus Hirsch, Antto Melasniemi, Michel Müller with Angkrit Ajchariyasophon, Sophie Aschauer, Uthit Atimana, Marc Bättig, Klaus Bollinger, Felix Broecker, Carlotta Brucker, Leonardo Bürgi, Letizia Calori, Jessica Coates, Claireban Coffey, Nico Dockx, Raphael Fellmer, Michael Gass, Philipp Gasser, Matthias Görlich, Manfred Grohmann, Raphaela Grolimund, Philipp Grünewald, Somyot Hananuntasuk, Carl Michael von Hausswolff, Karl Holmqvist, Pierre Huyghe, Duangporn Injan, Dueanthalay Injan, Kosit Juntaratip, Dong Kirativongkamchon, Komol Kongjarern, April Lamm, Paphonsak Laor, Kamin Lertchaiprasert, Daniela Leykam, Suwan Limanee, Glorimarta Linares, Kim Boris Löffler, Hector Madera, Therdsak Mahawongsanant, Violette Maillard, Chus Martinez, Philipp Misselwitz, Kritya Notanon, Tepparit Nuntasakun, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Tommaso Pagnacco, Intha Pankeaw, Philippe Parreno, Robert Peters, Thaiwijit Poengkasemsomboon, Tobias Rehberger, Anastasia Remes, Marion Ritzmann, François Roche, Natalia Rolon, Jirasak Saengpolsith, Heikki Salonen, Jörn Schafaff, Ilka Schön, Thasnai Sethaseree, Hanes Sturzenegger, Superflex, Molly Surno, Achim Vogelsberg, Emmi Wegener, Sasiwimon Wongjarin, Eveline Wüthrich

    ContributorsNikolaus Hirsch, Karl Holmqvist, April Lamm, Antto Melasniemi, Philipp Misselwitz, Michel Müller, Jörn Schafaff, Rirkrit Tiravanija

    • Paperback $14.95
  • Thinking through Painting

    Thinking through Painting

    Reflexivity and Agency beyond the Canvas

    Isabelle Graw, Daniel Birnbaum, and Nikolaus Hirsch

    Painting has demonstrated remarkable perseverance in the expanding field of contemporary art and the surrounding ecology of media images. It appears, however, to have dispelled its own once-uncontested material basis: no longer confined to being synonymous with a flat picture plane hung on the wall, today, painting instead tends to emphasize the apparatus of its appearance and the conduits of its circulation. With contributions by Peter Geimer, Isabelle Graw, and André Rottmann, Thinking through Painting investigates painting's traits and reception in cultural and socioeconomic discourse.

    Contributors Peter Geimer, Isabelle Graw, André Rottmann

    Institut für Kunstkritik Series

    • Paperback $16.00
  • Art and Subjecthood

    Art and Subjecthood

    The Return of the Human Figure in Semiocapitalism

    Isabelle Graw, Daniel Birnbaum, and Nikolaus Hirsch

    Many contemporary artworks evoke the human figure: consider the omnipresence of the mannequin in current installations of artists like John Miller, Thomas Hirschhorn, Heimo Zobernig, or David Lieske. Or consider the revival of a minimalist vocabulary, which embraces anthropomorphism as in the works of Isa Genzken and Rachel Harrison. This book brings together contributions from the eponymous conference, all of which seek to speculate on the reasons as to why, since the turn of the millennium, we have encountered so many artworks that tend to reconcile Minimalism with suggestions of the human figure. It proposes that this new artistic convention becomes rather questionable when discussed in the light of Franco Berardi's theory of semiocapitalism—a power technology that aims squarely at our human resources. The participants of this conference were asked to offer possible explanations for this wide acceptance of anthropomorphism—could it be that this is a manifestation of the increasingly desperate desire for art to have agency?

    Contributors Ina Blom, Oliver Brokel, Caroline Busta, Stefan Deines, Hal Foster, Stefanie Heraeus, Jutta Koether, Magdalena Nieslony, Michael Sanchez

    Institut für Kunstkritik Series

    • Paperback $19.95
  • Cybermohalla Hub

    Cybermohalla Hub

    Nikolaus Hirsch and Shveta Sarda

    The Cybermohalla project takes on the meaning of the Hindi word mohalla (neighborhood) in its sense of alleys and corners, relatedness and concreteness, as a means for talking about one's “place” in the city. Initiated by the Delhi-based research institute Sarai/CSDS and Ankur, Nikolaus Hirsch and Michel Müller developed a project that involves approximately seventy young practitioners, the Cybermohalla Ensemble, who engage with their urban contexts through various media. Cybermohalla Hub, a hybrid of studio, school, archive, community center, library, and gallery is a structure that moves between Delhi and diverse art contexts including Manifesta 7 and, most recently, the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark.

    The Cybermohalla experiment has been engaged in rethinking urban life, and reimagining and reanimating the infrastructure of cultural and intellectual life in contemporary cities. The book not only documents the architecture of the project, which functions as an attempt to “build knowledge,” but also publishes insights that have emerged from the project as a whole.

    Contributors Can Altay, Cybermohalla Ensemble, Rana Dasgupta, Hu Fang, Naeem Mohaiemen, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Jacques Rancière, Raqs Media Collective, Superflex, et al.

    • Paperback $29.95
  • Flaca / Tom Humphreys

    Flaca / Tom Humphreys

    Nikolaus Hirsch and Sophie von Olfers

    Emerging from the eponymous exhibition at Portikus in Frankfurt am Main, Flaca / Tom Humphreys reflects on the London exhibition space, Flaca, that Tom Humphreys organized between 2003 and 2007. Humphreys developed an exhibition that made no pretense to offer an illustrative or historically accurate representation of his activities at the time, instead turning the space into a distorted double set in the present. Humphreys is interested in questioning the activities of that time; some of the artists he invited for this exhibition, for instance, never showed at Flaca. As Christian Egger writes in the catalogue: “Exhibiting there often meant that you could look with a fresh eye at the first solo shows in London of artists you'd only just seen at Flaca, and that was all really quite exciting, as though you were experiencing a little bit of what the mobile phone you'd brought along had gone through when you first scared it by charging it with island juice, there was somehow a different energy—a flirtation with malfunction.” The catalogue compliments the energetic, engaged style embodied by both Flaca and the reflective exhibition.

    Co-published with Portikus

    Contributors Thomas Bayrle, Christian Egger, Nikolaus Hirsch, Sophie von Olfers

    • Paperback $34.00
  • Gleis 17 / Track 17

    Gleis 17 / Track 17

    Nikolaus Hirsch, Wolfgang Lorch, and Andrea Wandel

    “Crimes against humanity,” especially genocide, have been excluded from amnesty since the Nuremburg Trials. On a cultural level, oblivion by decree becomes an obligation to remember. This reversal is well-intended, but it opens up critical questions: Can memory be permanently established? Is it possible to maintain it in a monument?

    The intervention at Track 17 at Berlin-Grunewald station, a work by architects Nikolaus Hirsch, Wolfgang Lorch, and Andrea Wandel on the site of the deportations from Berlin between 1941 and 1945, is an attempt that aims at a structural connection between memory and oblivion. Referring to Alois Riegl's (the founder of the “Modern Cult of Monuments”) differentiation between the specific, highly controlled documentary value, and the generic, always changing “age value,” the authors introduce a strategy that negotiates between stable and instable parameters: presumably permanent data, shifting vegetal successions, material durations and decay. This approach investigates whether it is possible to build ambivalence or even doubt into a monument. Thus, the uncertain status of the material memory becomes the focus of the intervention at Track 17.

    The editors' work includes the Dresden Synagogue, the Hinzert Document Center, a high-rise building in the geopolitical hotspot of Tbilisi (Georgia), and the highly debated Archeological Zone / Jewish Museum in Cologne.

    Photos by Gerald Domenig and Lukas Roth

    Contributors Alfred Gottwaldt, Nikolaus Hirsch, Susanne Kill, Wolfgang Lorch, Jorge Otero-Pailos, Diana Schulle, Andrea Wandel, Harald Welzer

    • Paperback $26.00
  • Institution Building

    Institution Building

    Artists, Curators, Architects in the Struggle for Institutional Space

    Nikolaus Hirsch, Philipp Misselwitz, Markus Miessen, and Matthias Görlich

    This book presents a study that conceptualizes, tests, and practically applies the spatial strategy for the European Kunsthalle. The investigation is the result of the activities incorporated into a two-year work practice from 2005 to 2007, an iterative “applied research” informed by resonances between theory and practice.

    The developed approach attempts to constructively question ideas of “stability” and “instability” and—in doing so—proposes a specific strategy for the European Kunsthalle that positions it within a local, regional, national and international contemporary discourse.

    Nikolaus Hirsch, Philipp Misselwitz, Markus Miessen, and Matthias Görlich have developed three spatial strategies: an unstable configuration, a stable strategy as well as a model that consolidates the potentials of both variants towards a, albeit slowly, growing institution. The proposal acts as a laboratory that plans a collective structure consisting of individual components. It results in a network of possible spatial options stemming from programmatic modules and leads to numerous possible spatial configurations. This alternative institution is a showcase of a growing phenomenon problematizing the relationship between authorship and institution. As time spans of exhibitions become shorter and programs become more differentiated, architecture in itself becomes exhibition—renegotiating the default role models of artists and architects.

    Contributors Shumon Basar, Andrea Phillips, and Jan Verwoert

    • Paperback $26.00
  • On Boundaries

    On Boundaries

    Nikolaus Hirsch

    In several theoretical essays, dialogues on collaborative projects and reflections on his own work, the architect Nikolaus Hirsch explores the critical transformations of contemporary space and its effects on spatial practice. On the threshold to disciplines such as visual and performative arts (“Planning the Unpredictable” with William Forsythe) he questions the notion of “boundary”: as a phenomenon of social and political discourse, as a conflict between collaboration and authorship, as well as a physical limitation that negotiates between stable and unstable conditions.

    Nikolaus Hirsch is an architect based in Frankfurt am Main, who teaches at the Architectural Association in London and at UPenn in Philadelphia. His work includes the internationally acclaimed Dresden Synagogue, the Hinzert Document Center, the European Kunsthalle in Cologne and United Nations Plaza (with Anton Vidokle) in Berlin. He has curated ErsatzStadt: Repräsentationen des Urbanen at the Berlin Volksbühne. His work has been awarded a number of prizes, including the World Architecture Award 2002, and has been shown in exhibitions such as New German Architecture in Berlin, Utopia Station at the Venice Biennial and Can Buildings Curate, AA London/Storefront Gallery in New York.

    • Paperback $19.95

Contributor

  • Meaning Liam Gillick

    Meaning Liam Gillick

    Monika Szewczyk

    The first critical reader on one of today's most pivotal (and perplexing) contemporary artists.

    Liam Gillick emerged as part of the generation of “Young British Artists” who energized the British art scene in the 1980s and 1990s. He is now one of the most influential (and perplexing) artists in all of contemporary art. Gillick's discursive mode of art practice—often associated with “relational aesthetics”—complicates object production, embraces the exhibition as medium, and explores the social role and function of art. His body of work includes variations on “discussion platforms” (architectural structures that question or facilitate social interaction), text sculptures, and published texts that reflect on the increasing gap between utopian idealism and the real world. Artist, writer, curator, and provocateur, Gillick explores how an artistic practice can be conducted and represented, while at the same time questioning curatorial practice and the conventions of applied design. This reader coincides with a year-long, multi-venue, mid-career retrospective that serves both as a continuous investigation into Gillick's practice and an in-depth study of his work to date. The book offers a range of critical perspectives on Gillick's work. Among them: political scientist Chantall Mouffe develops her notion of radical democracy and antagonism; sociologist Maurizio Lazzarato (whose theorization of immaterial labor influenced Gillick) comments on the current economic crisis; philosopher and artist Benoît Maire links Gillick to continental philosophy; and Johanna Burton questions Gillick's practice in the context of feminist critique.ContributorsPeio Aguirre, Julieta Aranda, Johanna Burton, Nikolaus Hirsch, John Kelsey, Maurizio Lazzarato, Maria Lind, Sven Lütticken, Benoît Maire, Chantall Mouffe, Barbara Steiner, Marcus Verhagen

    • Paperback $24.95 £20.00