Oleg Kiselyov

Oleg Kiselyov is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Information Sciences at Tohoku University, Japan.

  • The Reasoned Schemer, Second Edition

    The Reasoned Schemer, Second Edition

    Daniel P. Friedman, William E. Byrd, Oleg Kiselyov, and Jason Hemann

    A new edition of a book, written in a humorous question-and-answer style, that shows how to implement  and use an elegant little programming language for logic programming.

    The goal of this book is to show the beauty and elegance of relational programming, which captures the essence of logic programming.  The book shows how to implement a relational programming language in Scheme, or in any other functional language, and demonstrates the remarkable flexibility of the resulting relational programs. As in the first edition, the pedagogical method is a series of questions and answers, which proceed with the characteristic humor that marked The Little Schemer and The Seasoned Schemer. Familiarity with a functional language or with the first five chapters of T he Little Schemer is assumed. 

    For this second edition, the authors have greatly simplified the programming language used in the book, as well as the implementation of the language. In addition to revising the text extensively, and simplifying and revising the “Laws” and “Commandments,” they have added explicit “Translation” rules to ease translation of Scheme functions into relations.

    • Paperback $30.00 £24.00
  • The Reasoned Schemer

    The Reasoned Schemer

    Daniel P. Friedman, William E. Byrd, and Oleg Kiselyov

    Extending the functional language Scheme with logical constructs in order to help the functional programmer think logically and the logic programmer think functionally.

    The goal of The Reasoned Schemer is to help the functional programmer think logically and the logic programmer think functionally. The authors of The Reasoned Schemer believe that logic programming is a natural extension of functional programming, and they demonstrate this by extending the functional language Scheme with logical constructs—thereby combining the benefits of both styles. The extension encapsulates most of the ideas in the logic programming language Prolog. The pedagogical method of The Reasoned Schemer is a series of questions and answers, which proceed with the characteristic humor that marked The Little Schemer and The Seasoned Schemer. Familiarity with a functional language or with the first eight chapters of The Little Schemer is assumed. Adding logic capabilities required the introduction of new forms. The authors' goal is to show to what extent writing logic programs is the same as writing functional programs using these forms. In this way, the reader of The Reasoned Schemer will come to understand how simple logic programming is and how easy it is to define functions that behave like relations.

    • Paperback $38.00 £30.00