Omer Fast

  • 5,000 Feet Is the Best

    5,000 Feet Is the Best

    Omer Fast, Milena Hoegsberg, and Melanie O'Brian

    This publication focuses on a single work of art: 5,000 Feet is the Best (2011) by artist Omer Fast. With this cinematic video work, Fast has entered into a discussion about one of the most pressing issues today, namely drone surveillance and warfare—that is, the use of unmanned planes operated by “pilots” on the ground.

    Produced to accompany exhibitions of Fast's work at Henie Onstad Kunstsenter (HOK) in Oslo (February 9–May 6, 2012) and at the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery in Toronto (September 15–November 25, 2012), this publication aims to bridge the gap between a critical reader and an artist book. Although the respective exhibitions include additional works by Fast, the examination of this single work allows not only for a consideration of his broader practice, but also an extensive examination of the subject of the work.

    Informed by Fast's layering of narrative and documentary material, this book compiles critical analyses of his film by art historians Liz Kotz and T. J. Demos, an article on drones reprinted from the journal Foreign Policy, as well as the artist's research and script materials set alongside film stills. Additionally, an e-mail thread of responses from practitioners active in different fields engages a range of issues pertaining to drone warfare, opening the conversation into a forum on politics, ethics, aesthetics, and human experience.

    Contributors David Rohde; further contributions by Jennifer Allen, Christoph Cox, Céline Condorelli, Simon Critchley, T. J. Demos, Am Johal, Liz Kotz, Tom McCarthy, Marit Paasche, Ed Steck, Karen Brown

    • Hardcover $26.00

Contributor

  • Displacements

    Displacements

    Architecture and Refugee

    Andrew Herscher

    In architectural history, just as in global politics, refugees have tended to exist as mere human surplus; histories of architecture, then, have usually reproduced the nation-state's exclusion of refugees as people out of place. Andrew Herscher's Displacements: Architecture and Refugee, the ninth book in the Critical Spatial Practice series, examines some of the usually disavowed but arguably decisive intersections of mass-population displacement and architecture—an art and technology of population placement—through the twentieth century and into the present. Posing the refugee as the preeminent collective political subject of our time, Displacements attempts to open up an architectural history of the refugee that could refract on the history of architecture and the history of the refugee alike.

    Critical Spatial Practice 9Edited by Nikolaus Hirsch, Markus MiessenFeaturing artwork by Omer Fast

    • Paperback $19.95