Paul Bloom

Paul Bloom is Professor of Psychology at Yale University.

  • How Children Learn the Meanings of Words

    How Children Learn the Meanings of Words

    Paul Bloom

    How do children learn that the word "dog" refers not to all four-legged animals, and not just to Ralph, but to all members of a particular species? How do they learn the meanings of verbs like "think," adjectives like "good," and words for abstract entities such as "mortgage" and "story"? The acquisition of word meaning is one of the fundamental issues in the study of mind.

    According to Paul Bloom, children learn words through sophisticated cognitive abilities that exist for other purposes. These include the ability to infer others' intentions, the ability to acquire concepts, an appreciation of syntactic structure, and certain general learning and memory abilities. Although other researchers have associated word learning with some of these capacities, Bloom is the first to show how a complete explanation requires all of them. The acquisition of even simple nouns requires rich conceptual, social, and linguistic capacities interacting in complex ways.

    This book requires no background in psychology or linguistics and is written in a clear, engaging style. Topics include the effects of language on spatial reasoning, the origin of essentialist beliefs, and the young child's understanding of representational art. The book should appeal to general readers interested in language and cognition as well as to researchers in the field.

    • Hardcover $60.00
    • Paperback $35.00
  • Language, Logic, and Concepts

    Language, Logic, and Concepts

    Ray S. Jackendoff, Paul Bloom, and Karen Wynn

    This wide-ranging collection of essays is inspired by the memory of the cognitive psychologist John Macnamara, whose influential contributions to language and concept acquisition have provided the basis for numerous research programs. The areas covered by the essays include the foundations of language and thought, congnitive and linguistic development, and mathematical approaches to cognition.

    • Hardcover $100.00
    • Paperback $45.00
  • Language and Space

    Language and Space

    Paul Bloom, Merrill F. Garrett, Lynn Nadel, and Mary A. Peterson

    The fifteen original contributions in Language and Space bring together the major lines of research and the most important theoretical viewpoints in the areas of psychology, linguistics, anthropology, and neuroscience, providing a much needed synthesis across these diverse domains.

    The study of the relationship between natural language and spatial cognition has the potential to yield answers to vexing questions about the nature of the mind, language, and culture. The fifteen original contributions in Language and Space bring together the major lines of research and the most important theoretical viewpoints in the areas of psychology, linguistics, anthropology, and neuroscience, providing a much needed synthesis across these diverse domains.

    Each chapter gives a clear up-to-date account of a particular research program. Overall, they address such questions as: how does the brain represent space, how many kinds of spatial representations are there, how do we learn to talk about space and what role does culture play in these matters, should experimental tests of the relations between space and language be restricted to closed-class linguistic elements or must the role of open-class elements be considered as well? Throughout authors speak to each other's arguments, laying bare key areas of agreement and disagreement.

    Contributors Manfred Bierwisch, Paul Bloom, Melissa Bowerman, Karen Emmorey, Merrill Garrett, Ray Jackendoff, Philip Johnson-Laird, Barbara Landau, Willem Levelt, Stephen Levinson, Gordon Logan, Jean Mandler, Lynn Nadel, John O'Keefe, Mary Peterson, Daniel Sadler, Tim Shallice, Len Talmy, Barbara Tversky

    • Hardcover $112.50
    • Paperback $45.00
  • Language Acquisition

    Language Acquisition

    Core Readings

    Paul Bloom

    Language Acquisition offers, in one convenient reader, work by the most outstanding researchers in each field and is intended as a snapshot of the sort of theory and research taking place in language acquisition in the 1990s. All of the articles and chapters were chosen to reflect topics and debates of current interest, and all take an interdisciplinary approach to language development, relating the study of how a child comes to possess a language to issues within linguistics, computational theory, biology, social cognition, and comparative psychology.

    While there are several introductory texts on language development, and countless collections of articles, these scientists are asking about language acquisition, the important experimental findings, and the key theoretical debates, suitable for students at advanced levels and scholars with a range of different perspectives and interests.

    The readings are organized into six sections:- the onset of language development,- word learning,- syntax and semantics,- morphology,- acquisition in special circumstances, and- alternative perspectives. Each section serves as an introduction to a specific area and provides sufficient background for further reading.

    Contributors Dare A. Baldwin. Paul Bloom. Melissa Bowerman. Kathie L. Carpenter. Eve V. Clark. Stephen Crain. Richard F. Cromer. Anne Fernald. Lila Gleitman. Richard Goldberg. Susan Goldin-Meadow. Peter Gordon. Jess Gropen. Michelle Hollander. Janellen Huttenlocher. Annette Karmiloff-Smith. Ellen M.Markman. Peter Marler. Jay L. McClelland. Carolyn Mylander. Elissa L. Newport. Laura Ann Petitto. Steven Pinker. David E. Rumelhart. Patricia Smiley. A Bradford Book

    • Hardcover $47.50
    • Paperback $10.75

Contributor

  • On Anger

    On Anger

    Agnes Callard

    Is anger eternal? Righteous? Reflections on the causes and consequences of an phenomenon critical to our intimate and public lives.

    From Aristotle to Martha Nussbaum, philosophers have explored the moral status of anger. We get angry for a reason: we feel wronged. That reason can be eternal, some argue, because not even an apology or promise that it won't happen again can change the fact of the original harm. Although there are pragmatic reasons for ceasing to be angry and moving on, is eternal anger moral? Is anger righteous? In this collection, contributors consider these and other questions about the causes and consequences of anger.

    Leading off the debate, philosopher Agnes Callard argues that anger is not righteous rage; it is not an effort to solve a problem. Instead, it reflects a cry for help—a recognition that something shared is broken. And only in acknowledging the value of that shared project, she argues, can we begin together to repair it. Anger, then, is a starting point. But could there ever be the end of anger?

    Bringing together today's leading thinkers on anger, this volume raises questions critical to our intimate and public lives.

    Contributors

    Rachel Achs, Paul Bloom, Elizabeth Bruenig, Judith Butler, Agnes Callard, Daryl Cameron, Myisha Cherry, Barbara Herman, Desmond Jagmohan, David Konstan, Oded Na'aman, Martha C. Nussbaum, Amy Olberding, Whitney Phillips, Jesse Prinz, Victoria Spring, Brandon M. Terry

    • Paperback $15.95
  • Discovery, Innovation, and Risk

    Discovery, Innovation, and Risk

    Case Studies in Science and Technology

    Newton H. Copp and Andrew W. Zanella

    How do scientific principles work in the real world? Discovery, Innovation, and Risk presents brief descriptions of selected scientific principles in the context of interesting technological examples to illustrate the complex interplay among science, engineering, and society. An understanding of scientific principles is developed through the technology rather than in isolation from it. Drawn from significant contributions to modern culture that arose during the Second Industrial Revolution, examples depict events in each of the major divisions of engineering, touch on key principles in physics, chemistry, and biology, and introduce the important concept of risk.

    Case studies in the first section emphasize technological developments growing directly from scientific discoveries. These cases include telegraphy and the origin of telecommunications as an application of discoveries in electromagnetism, hydroelectric power as an outgrowth of Faraday's work in electromagnetic induction, and the airplane as a product of the Wright brothers' scientific approach to an engineering problem. Case studies in the second section show that technological innovation can proceed without a full understanding of the underlying science, as in the development of steam power for use in electric power plants, the production of gasoline from crude oil, and the development of prestressed concrete for use in building bridges. The fact that new technological developments often bring risks is amply illustrated in the third section by case studies on vaccines, the greenhouse effect, and atomic power.

    • Hardcover $45.00
    • Paperback $40.00