Rick van der Ploeg

Rick van der Ploeg is Professor of Economics and Research Director of the Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.

  • Climate Policy and Nonrenewable Resources

    Climate Policy and Nonrenewable Resources

    The Green Paradox and Beyond

    Karen Pittel, Rick van der Ploeg, and Cees Withagen

    A detailed and rigorous analysis of the effect of climate policies on climate change that questions the empirical and theoretical support for the “green paradox.”

    Recent developments suggest that well-intended climate policies—including carbon taxes and subsidies for renewable energy—might not accomplish what policy makers intend. Hans-Werner Sinn has described a “green paradox,” arguing that these policies could hasten global warming by encouraging owners of fossil fuel reserves to increase their extraction rates for fear that their reserves will become worthless. In this volume, economists investigate the empirical and theoretical support for the green paradox.

    Offering detailed and rigorous analyses of the forces and assumptions driving Sinn's argument, the contributors consider whether rising carbon tax rates inevitably speed up climate change; the effects of the design of resource markets, the availability of clean substitutes, and the development of new technologies; and the empirical evidence (or lack thereof) for the green paradox result. They consider extraction costs; sustainability and innovation; timing, announcement effects, and time consistency in relation to policy measures; and empirical results for the green paradox phenomena under several alternative policy measures.

    Contributors Julien Daubanes, Corrado Di Maria, Carolyn Fischer, Florian Habermacher, Michael Hoel, Darko Jus, Gebhard Kirchgassner, Ian Lange, Pierre Lasserre, Volker Meier, Karen Pittel, Stephen Salant, Frank Stähler, Gerard van der Meijden, Frederick van der Ploeg, Edwin van der Werf, Ngo Van Long, Ralph A. Winter, Cees Withagen

    • Hardcover $19.75 £15.99

Contributor

  • The Continuing Evolution of Europe

    The Continuing Evolution of Europe

    Thiess Buettner and Wolfgang Ochel

    Economists address key challenges facing the EU, including financial instability, welfare state reform, inadequate institutional framework, and global economic integration.

    The European Union began with efforts in the Cold War era to foster economic integration among a few Western European countries. Today's EU constitutes an upper tier of government that affects almost every level of policymaking in each of its twenty-seven member states. The recent financial and economic crises have tested this still-evolving institutional framework, and this book surveys key economic challenges faced by the EU.

    Prominent European economists examine such topics as the stability of the financial markets and possible policy options to reduce future vulnerability to crises, including Glass-Steagull-style narrow banking; the effect of emerging economies such as China and India on Europe's economic position; the protection of national interests in industrial policy; reforming and preserving the welfare state in the face of unemployment, population aging, and worker mobility within the EU; and improving the EU's institutional framework by reassigning responsibilities among supranational, national, and local governments.

    Among the conclusions that emerge from these analyses are the necessity for banking regulation as well as budgetary discipline; the need to consider global as well as European integration; and the idea that an environment that fosters internal competition will increase Europe's competitiveness internationally.

    • Hardcover $7.75 £5.99
    • Paperback $25.00 £20.00