Robert E. Baldwin

Robert E. Baldwin is Hilldale Professor Emeritus in the Department of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author or coauthor of many books, including most recently The Decline of US Labor Unions and the Role of Trade. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

  • The Development and Testing of Heckscher-Ohlin Trade Models

    The Development and Testing of Heckscher-Ohlin Trade Models

    A Review

    Robert E. Baldwin

    A review of the theoretical twists and turns in the development of the Heckscher-Ohlin model and an empirical assessment of the basic model and three related theorems.

    No names are more closely associated with modern trade theory than Eli Heckscher and Bertil Ohlin. The basic Heckscher-Ohlin proposition, according to which a country exports factors in abundant supply and imports factors in scarce supply, is a key component of modern trade theory. In this book, Robert Baldwin traces the development of the HO model, describing the historical twists and turns that have led to the basic modern theoretical model in use today. Baldwin not only presents a clear and cohesive view of the model's evolution but also reviews the results of empirical tests its various versions. Baldwin, who published his first theoretical article on the HO model in 1948, first surveys the development of the HO model and then assesses empirical tests of its predictions. Most discussions of empirical work on HO models confine themselves to the basic theorem, but Baldwin devotes a chapter to empirical tests of three related propositions: the Stolper-Samuelson theorem; the Rybczynski theorem; and the factor price equalization theorem. He concludes that the formulation and testing of these later models have improved economists' understanding of the forces shaping international trade, but that many empirical trade economists (himself included) were so enamored of the elegant but highly unrealistic factor price equalization models developed from the insights of Heckscher and Ohlin that they have neglected investigation of other models without this relationship.

    • Hardcover $35.00
  • The Political Economy of U.S. Import Policy

    Robert E. Baldwin

    Using public choice theory as a framework, this book explains the manner in which U.S. import policies are determined and analyzes the types of economic and political factors that affect the policymaking of the Congress, the International Trade Commission, and the President and his advisors.

    Although trade-policy issues are becoming increasingly important, there is little rigorous analysis of the nature of the decision-making process that includes both economic and political factors. Using public choice theory as a framework, this book explains the manner in which U.S. import policies are determined and analyzes the types of economic and political factors that affect the policymaking of the Congress, the International Trade Commission, and the President and his advisors. The book's discussion of Congress focuses on the formulation and implementation of the Trade Act of 1974, in which Congress regained some of the trade-policy powers that it had delegated to the President. It explores both the appointment and decision-making process in the ITC, and statistically analyzes the factors influencing the President's acceptance of the ITC's findings in import relief cases and tests various hypotheses designed to explain interindustry variations in the tariff cuts offered by the United States in the Tokyo Round of multilateral trade negotiations. Baldwin finds serious fault in the interactive policymaking of the Congress, ITC, and the Executive Branch. In a concluding chapter he makes recommendations concerning the decision-making process in import injury cases and in antidumping and countervailing duty petitions, the appointment and the budgeting process for the ITC, and the interaction of the President and the Congress in multilateral trade negotiations.

    • Hardcover $30.00