Robert N. McCauley

  • Dodging Bullets

    Dodging Bullets

    Changing U.S. Corporate Capital Structure in the 1980s and 1990s

    Robert N. McCauley, Judith S. Ruud, and Frank Iacono

    An entertaining summary of the broad reshaping of U.S. corporate finance in the last decade and a half.

    The late 1980s saw a huge wave of corporate leveraging. The U.S. financial landscape was dominated by a series of high-stakes leveraged buyouts as firms replaced their equity with new fixed debt obligations. Cash-financed acquisitions and defensive share repurchases also decapitalized corporations. This trend culminated in the sensational debt-financed bidding for RJR-Nabisco, the largest leveraged buyout of all time, before dramatically reversing itself in the early 1990s with a rapid return to equity.This entertaining summary of the broad reshaping of U.S. corporate finance in the last decade and a half looks at three major issues: why corporations leveraged up in the first place, why and how the leverage wave came to an end, and what policy lessons are to be drawn.Using the Minsky-Kindleberger model as a framework, the authors interpret the rise and fall of leveraging as a financial market mania. In the course of chronicling the return to equity in the 1990s, they address a number of important corporate finance questions: How important was the return to equity in relieving corporations' debt burdens? How did the return to equity affect the ability of young high-tech firms to finance themselves without selling out to foreign firms?

    • Hardcover $45.00

Contributor

  • Taxation and Regulation of the Financial Sector

    Taxation and Regulation of the Financial Sector

    Ruud de Mooij and Gaëtan Nicodème

    Analytical and empirical perspectives on the interplay of taxation and regulation in the financial sector.

    The global financial crisis has prompted economists to rethink fundamental questions on how governments should intervene in the financial sector. Many countries have already begun to reform the taxation and regulation of the financial sector—in the United States, for example, the Dodd–Frank Act became law in 2010; in Europe, different countries have introduced additional taxes on the sector and made substantial progress toward a banking union for the eurozone. Only recently, however, has a new field in economics emerged to study the interplay between public finance and banking. This book offers the latest thinking on the topic by American and European economists.

    The contributors first explore new conceptual ground, offering rigorous theoretical analyses that help us better understand how tax policy and regulation can contribute to avoiding another crisis or reducing its impact. Contributors then investigate the behavior of financial institutions in response to various forms of taxation and regulation, offering empirical evidence that is vital for policy design.

    ContributorsThiess Buettner, Jin Cao, Giuseppina Cannas, Gunther Capelle-Blancard, Jessica Cariboni, Brian Coulter, Ernesto Crivelli, Ruud de Mooij, Michael P. Devereux, Katharina Erbe, Ricardo Fenochietto, Marco Petracco Giudici, Timothy J. Goodspeed, Reint Gropp, Olena Havyrlchyk, Michael Keen, Lawrence L. Kreicher, Julia Lendvai, Ben Lockwood, Massimo Marchesi, Donato Masciandaro, Colin Mayer, Robert N. McCauley, Patrick McGuire, Gaëtan Nicodème, Masanori Orihara, Francesco Passarelli, Carola Pessino, Rafal Raciborski, John Vickers, Lukas Vogel, Stefano Zedda

    • Hardcover $37.00
  • The Evolving Role of China in the Global Economy

    The Evolving Role of China in the Global Economy

    Yin-Wong Cheung and Jakob de Haan

    Experts analyze four factors in China's economic growth: exchange rate policy, savings and investments, monetary policy, and foreign direct investments.

    China is now the world's second largest economy and may soon overtake the United States as the world's largest. Despite its adoption of some free-market principles, China considers itself a “socialist-market economy,” suggesting that the government still plays a major role in the country's economic development. This book offers a systematic analysis of four factors in China's rapid economic growth: exchange rate policy, savings and investment, monetary policy and capital controls, and foreign direct investment (FDI).

    Contributors offer fresh perspectives on the undervaluation of the renminbi, the dollar peg, and China's macroeconomic relationships with the rest of the world. They review factors shaping China's saving dynamics and analyze the growth of the private sector despite limited access to external finance. They examine the monetary policy independence of the People's Bank of China, offshore markets for China's currency, and the effectiveness of China's capital controls. Finally, they consider Chinese FDI in terms of China's growing demand for energy and raw materials, exploring the factors that drive China's FDI in the conventional oil-producing countries and in Africa.

    • Hardcover $42.00