Robert R. Hoffman

Robert R. Hoffman is Senior Research Scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition in Pensacola, Florida.

  • Minding the Weather

    Minding the Weather

    How Expert Forecasters Think

    Robert R. Hoffman, Daphne S. LaDue, H. Michael Mogil, Paul J. Roebber, and J. Gregory Trafton

    A detailed study of research on the psychology of expertise in weather forecasting, drawing on findings in cognitive science, meteorology, and computer science.

    This book argues that the human cognition system is the least understood, yet probably most important, component of forecasting accuracy. Minding the Weather investigates how people acquire massive and highly organized knowledge and develop the reasoning skills and strategies that enable them to achieve the highest levels of performance.

    The authors consider such topics as the forecasting workplace; atmospheric scientists' descriptions of their reasoning strategies; the nature of expertise; forecaster knowledge, perceptual skills, and reasoning; and expert systems designed to imitate forecaster reasoning. Drawing on research in cognitive science, meteorology, and computer science, the authors argue that forecasting involves an interdependence of humans and technologies. Human expertise will always be necessary.

    • Hardcover $55.00 £45.00
  • Working Minds

    Working Minds

    A Practitioner's Guide to Cognitive Task Analysis

    Beth Crandall, Gary A. Klein, and Robert R. Hoffman

    How to collect data about cognitive processes and events, how to analyze CTA findings, and how to communicate them effectively: a handbook for managers, trainers, systems analysts, market researchers, health professionals, and others.

    Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) helps researchers understand how cognitive skills and strategies make it possible for people to act effectively and get things done. CTA can yield information people need—employers faced with personnel issues, market researchers who want to understand the thought processes of consumers, trainers and others who design instructional systems, health care professionals who want to apply lessons learned from errors and accidents, systems analysts developing user specifications, and many other professionals. CTA can show what makes the workplace work—and what keeps it from working as well as it might.

    Working Minds is a true handbook, offering a set of tools for doing CTA: methods for collecting data about cognitive processes and events, analyzing them, and communicating them effectively. It covers both the "why" and the "how" of CTA methods, providing examples, guidance, and stories from the authors' own experiences as CTA practitioners. Because effective use of CTA depends on some conceptual grounding in cognitive theory and research—on knowing what a cognitive perspective can offer—the book also offers an overview of current research on cognition.

    The book provides detailed guidance for planning and carrying out CTA, with chapters on capturing knowledge and capturing the way people reason. It discusses studying cognition in real-world settings and the challenges of rapidly changing technology. And it describes key issues in applying CTA findings in a variety of fields. Working Minds makes the methodology of CTA accessible and the skills involved attainable.

    • Hardcover $70.00 £58.00
    • Paperback $34.95 £28.00
  • Expertise in Context

    Expertise in Context

    Paul J. Feltovich, Kenneth M. Ford, and Robert R. Hoffman

    Computerized "expert systems" are among the best-known applications of artificial intelligence. But what is expertise? The nature of knowledge and expertise, and their relation to context, is the focus of active discussion and controversy among psychologists, philosophers, computer scientists, and other cognitive scientists. The questions reach to the very foundations of cognitive theory. The twenty-three original essay in this volume discuss the essential nature of expert knowledge, as well as such questions as how "expertise" differs from mere "knowledge," the relation between the individual and group processes involved in knowledge in general and expertise in particular, the social and other contexts of expertise, how expertise can be assessed, and the relation between human and computer expertise.

    Contributors N. M. Agnew, D. Bertram, S. Bringsjord, N. Charness, W. Clancey, H. M. Collins, T. M. Converse, R. L. Coulson, D. DuBois, K. A. Ericsson, P. J. Feltovich, K. M. Ford, N. D. Geddes, K. J. Hammond, C. C. Hayes, P. J. Hayes, H. Hexmoor, C. T. Kulik, H. E. Kyburg, M. LaFrance, F. J. Lerch, G. F. Luger, M. Miller, M. Minsky, K. O'Hara, A. L. Patalano, V. L. Patel, D. Perlis, M. J. Prietula, M. F. Ramoni, A. T. Rappaport, C. M. Seifert, N. Shadbolt, V. L. Shalin, S. C. Shapiro, R. J. Spiro, E. W. Stein, C. R. Stern, R. J. Sternberg, M. A. Szczepkowski, C. M. Zeitz

    • Paperback $13.75 £10.99