Sandi Hilal

  • Architecture after Revolution

    Architecture after Revolution

    Alessandro Petti, Sandi Hilal, and Eyal Weizman

    The work presented in this book is an invitation to undertake an urgent architectural and political thought experiment: to rethink today's struggles for justice and equality not only from the historical perspective of revolution, but also from that of a continued struggle for decolonization; consequently, to rethink the problem of political subjectivity not from the point of view of a Western conception of a liberal citizen but rather from that of the displaced and extraterritorial refugee. You will not find here descriptions of popular uprising, armed resistance, or political negotiations, despite these of course forming an integral and necessary part of any radical political transformation. Instead, the authors present a series of provocative projects that try to imagine “the morning after revolution.”

    Located on the edge of the desert in the town of Beit Sahour in Palestine, the architectural collective Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency (DAAR) has since 2007 combined discourse, spatial intervention, collective learning, public meetings, and legal challenges to open an arena for speculating about the seemingly impossible: the actual transformation of Israel's physical structures of domination. Against an architectural history of decolonization that sought to reuse colonial architecture for the same purpose for which it was originally built, DAAR sees opportunities in a set of playful propositions for the subversion, reuse, profanation, and recycling of these structures of domination and the legal infrastructures that sustain them.

    DAAR's projects should be understood as a series of architectural fables set in different locations: an abandoned military base near Beit Sahour, the refugee camp of Dheisheh in Bethlehem, the remnants of three houses on the Jaffa beach, the uncompleted Palestinian Parliament building, the historical village of Battir, the village of Miska destroyed during the Nakba, and the red-roofed West Bank colony of Jabel Tawil (P'sagot) next to Ramallah-El Bireh.

    • Hardcover $32.00

Contributor

  • Forms of Assembly

    A Critical Inquiry

    Anne Davidian and Laurent Jeanpierre

    A crossdisciplinary inquiry into the practices and forms of assembly making, through multiple times and geographies.

    How does the spatial organization and architecture of assemblies promote or hinder debate and collective decisionmaking? What are the material, rhetorical, and affective devices involved in forms of assembling? Through which scripts and rituals does an assembly become an ephemeral collective or an institution?

    From ancestral practices in the indigenous territories of Brazil to the forgotten legacy of the communal assemblies of medieval Europe, from global experiments in radical democracy to the material history of parliaments “from above” and “from below,” Forms of Assembly makes the form of the assembly the specific object of a crossdisciplinary inquiry. Exploring and weaving together the aesthetic, anthropological, historical, and political aspects of assembly making, it questions the implications of forms on our political imaginary and agency, challenging the ways in which people gather, and how these forms of gathering shape how they think, speak, and act together. 

    Forms of Assembly features commissioned texts and conversations with artists, architects, cultural theorists, social scientists, and organizers that provide original perspectives on the subject, as well as a selection of experimental assembly designs, including three new proposals specially conceived for the publication.

    Texts by Ayreen Anastas and Rene Gabri, Hans Asenbaum, Jean-Godefroy Bidima, Patrick Boucheron, Manolo Callahan, François Coorens, Pascale Dufour, Tallulah Frappier, Delphine Gardey, Stacey Liou

    Conversations with Frédérique Aït-Touati, Piersandra di Matteo and Florian Malzacher; Sandra Benites, Ana Terra Yawalapiti and Pablo Lafuente; Laura Lavin and Alana Gerecke; Catherine Malabou and Laurent Jeanpierre, Charlotte Malterre-Barthes and Markus Miessen, Philippe Urfalino and Laurent Jeanpierre

    With contributions by Markus Miessen, Aleksandra Wasilkowska, raumlabor, Andreas Angelidakis, Decolonizing Architecture Art Research (DAAR), G1000, Sandi Hilal, Bruno Latour, Jonas Staal, Sumayya Valli

    • Paperback $32.00