Joe Kerr

Joe Kerr is Head of the Department of Critical and Historical Studies, Royal College of Art, London.

  • The Unknown City

    The Unknown City

    Contesting Architecture and Social Space

    Iain Borden, Joe Kerr, and Jane Rendell

    Essays on architecture as narrative and urban space as experience and the new geographies they create.

    The Unknown City takes its place in the emerging architectural literature that looks beyond design process and buildings to discover new ways of looking at the urban experience. A multistranded contemplation of the notion of "knowing a place," it is about both the existence and the possibilities of architecture and the city. An important inspiration for the book is the work of Henri Lefebvre, in particular his ideas on space as a historical production. Many of the essays also draw on the social critique and tactics of the Situationist movement. The international gathering of contributors includes art, architectural, and urban historians and theorists; urban geographers; architects, artists, and filmmakers; and literary and cultural theorists. The essays range from abstract considerations of spatial production and representation to such concrete examples of urban domination as video surveillance and Regency London as the site of male pleasure. Although many of the essays are driven by social, cultural, and urban theory, they also tell real stories about real places. Each piece is in some way a critique of capitalism and a thought experiment about how designers and city dwellers working together can shape the cities of tomorrow.

    • Hardcover $88.00
    • Paperback $55.00

Contributor

  • Sensorium

    Sensorium

    Embodied Experience, Technology, and Contemporary Art

    Caroline A. Jones

    Artists and writers reconsider the relationship between the body and electronic technology in the twenty-first century through essays, artworks, and an encyclopedic "Abecedarius of the New Sensorium."

    The relationship between the body and electronic technology, extensively theorized through the 1980s and 1990s, has reached a new technosensual comfort zone in the early twenty-first century. In Sensorium, contemporary artists and writers explore the implications of the techno-human interface. Ten artists, chosen by an international team of curators, offer their own edgy investigations of embodied technology and the technologized body. These range from Matthieu Briand's experiment in "controlled schizophrenia" and Janet Cardiff and Georges Bures Miller's uneasy psychological soundscapes to Bruce Nauman's uncanny night visions and François Roche's destabilized architecture. The art in Sensorium—which accompanies an exhibition at the MIT List Visual Arts Center—captures the aesthetic attitude of this hybrid moment, when modernist segmentation of the senses is giving way to dramatic multisensory mixes or transpositions. Artwork by each artist appears with an analytical essay by a curator, all of it prefaced by an anchoring essay on "The Mediated Sensorium" by Caroline Jones. In the second half of Sensorium, scholars, scientists, and writers contribute entries to an "Abecedarius of the New Sensorium." These short, playful pieces include Bruno Latour on "Air," Barbara Maria Stafford on "Hedonics," Michel Foucault (from a little-known 1966 radio lecture) on the "Utopian Body," Donna Haraway on "Compoundings," and Neal Stephenson on the "Viral." Sensorium is both forensic and diagnostic, viewing the culture of the technologized body from the inside, by means of contemporary artists' provocations, and from a distance, in essays that situate it historically and intellectually. Copublished with The MIT List Visual Arts Center.

    • Hardcover $46.95
  • Information Arts

    Information Arts

    Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology

    Stephen Wilson

    An introduction to the work and ideas of artists who use—and even influence—science and technology.

    A new breed of contemporary artist engages science and technology—not just to adopt the vocabulary and gizmos, but to explore and comment on the content, agendas, and possibilities. Indeed, proposes Stephen Wilson, the role of the artist is not only to interpret and to spread scientific knowledge, but to be an active partner in determining the direction of research. Years ago, C. P. Snow wrote about the "two cultures" of science and the humanities; these developments may finally help to change the outlook of those who view science and technology as separate from the general culture.

    In this rich compendium, Wilson offers the first comprehensive survey of international artists who incorporate concepts and research from mathematics, the physical sciences, biology, kinetics, telecommunications, and experimental digital systems such as artificial intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In addition to visual documentation and statements by the artists, Wilson examines relevant art-theoretical writings and explores emerging scientific and technological research likely to be culturally significant in the future. He also provides lists of resources including organizations, publications, conferences, museums, research centers, and Web sites.

    • Hardcover $49.95
    • Paperback $50.00
  • Parallel Programming Using C++

    Parallel Programming Using C++

    Gregory V. Wilson and Paul Lu

    Foreword by Bjarne Stroustrup Software is generally acknowledged to be the single greatest obstacle preventing mainstream adoption of massively-parallel computing. While sequential applications are routinely ported to platforms ranging from PCs to mainframes, most parallel programs only ever run on one type of machine. One reason for this is that most parallel programming systems have failed to insulate their users from the architectures of the machines on which they have run. Those that have been platform-independent have usually also had poor performance. Many researchers now believe that object-oriented languages may offer a solution. By hiding the architecture-specific constructs required for high performance inside platform-independent abstractions, parallel object-oriented programming systems may be able to combine the speed of massively-parallel computing with the comfort of sequential programming. Parallel Programming Using C++ describes fifteen parallel programming systems based on C++, the most popular object-oriented language of today. These systems cover the whole spectrum of parallel programming paradigms, from data parallelism through dataflow and distributed shared memory to message-passing control parallelism. For the parallel programming community, a common parallel application is discussed in each chapter, as part of the description of the system itself. By comparing the implementations of the polygon overlay problem in each system, the reader can get a better sense of their expressiveness and functionality for a common problem. For the systems community, the chapters contain a discussion of the implementation of the various compilers and runtime systems. In addition to discussing the performance of polygon overlay, several of the contributors also discuss the performance of other, more substantial, applications. For the research community, the contributors discuss the motivations for and philosophy of their systems. As well, many of the chapters include critiques that complete the research arc by pointing out possible future research directions. Finally, for the object-oriented community, there are many examples of how encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism can be used to control the complexity of developing, debugging, and tuning parallel software.

    • Paperback $65.00
  • Practical Parallel Programming

    Practical Parallel Programming

    Gregory V. Wilson

    Practical Parallel Programming provides scientists and engineers with a detailed, informative, and often critical introduction to parallel programming techniques.

    Parallel computers have become widely available in recent years. Many scientists are now using them to investigate the grand challenges of science, such as modeling global climate change, determining the masses of elementary particles from first principles, or sequencing the human genome. However, software for parallel computers has developed far more slowly than the hardware. Many incompatible programming systems exist, and many useful programming techniques are not widely known.Practical Parallel Programming provides scientists and engineers with a detailed, informative, and often critical introduction to parallel programming techniques. Following a review of the fundamentals of parallel computer theory and architecture, it describes four of the most popular parallel programming models in use today—data parallelism, shared variables, message passing, and Linda—and shows how each can be used to solve various scientific and numerical problems. Examples, coded in various dialects of Fortran, are drawn from such domains as the solution of partial differential equations, solution of linear equations, the simulation of cellular automata, studies of rock fracturing, and image processing. Practical Parallel Programming will be particularly helpful for scientists and engineers who use high-performance computers to solve numerical problems and do physical simulations but who have little experience of networking or concurrency. The book can also be used by advanced undergraduate and graduate students in computer science in conjunction with material covering parallel architectures and algorithms in more detail. Computer science students will gain a critical appraisal of the current state of the art in parallel programming. Scientific and Engineering Computation series

    • Hardcover $70.00
    • Paperback $135.00