Steven J. Davis

Steven Davis is William H. Abbott Distinguished Service Professor of International Business and Economics at the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business.

  • Job Creation and Destruction

    Job Creation and Destruction

    Steven J. Davis, John C. Haltwanger, and Scott Schuh

    The authors describe in detail those characteristics that destroy andcreate jobs over time (including industry of origin, wage payments,international trade exposure, factor intensity, size, age, andproductivity performance), while also providing a broader measure ofthe process that will be directly relevant to macroeconomists andpolicymakers.

    Job Creation and Destruction is the culmination of a long, ongoing research program at the Center for Economic Studies. Using the most complete plant- level data source currently available—the Longitudinal Research Data constructed by the Census Bureau—it focuses on the U.S. manufacturing sector from 1972 to 1988 and develops a statistical portrait of the microeconomic adjustments to the many economic events that affect businesses and workers. The picture that emerges is one of large, persistent, and highly concentrated gross job flows, with job destruction dominating the cyclical feaures of net job flows. The authors describe in detail those characteristics that destroy and create jobs over time (including industry of origin, wage payments, international trade exposure, factor intensity, size, age, and productivity performance), while also providing a broader measure of the process that will be directly relevant to macroeconomists and policymakers.

    • Hardcover $39.50 £32.00
    • Paperback $35.00 £28.00

Contributor

  • Guns and Butter

    Guns and Butter

    The Economic Causes and Consequences of Conflict

    Gregory D. Hess

    Insights into war and domestic insecurity, terrorism, and the costs of war and peace from new research that takes the political economy perspective on conflict.

    Guns and Butter examines the causes and consequences of war from a political economy perspective, taking as its premise that a consideration of the incentives and constraints faced by individuals and groups is paramount in understanding conflict decision making. The chapter authors—leading economists and political scientists—believe that this perspective offers deeper insights into war and peace choices than the standard state-centric approach. Their contributions offer both theoretical and empirical support for the political economy perspective on conflict. Several broad themes cut across the chapters: war as an equilibrium phenomenon rather than an exogenous process; the interaction of politics, economics, and institutions and its effect on the frequency and severity of conflicts; the cost of fighting; and the often innovative character of conflict. Topics addressed include theoretical aspects of the ways in which domestic politics affects the decision to go to war; globalization and its effect on the net supply of terrorism; open markets and the likelihood of war and domestic insecurity; the costs of going to war in Iraq as compared to the costs of containment; the economic effects of the Rwandan genocide at a household level; and the evolving industrial organization of terrorist groups.

    Contributors Brock Blomberg, Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, Ethan Bueno de Mesquita, Steven J. Davis, Michelle R. Garfinkel Edward Glaeser, Gregory D. Hess, Kai Konrad, Kevin M. Murphy, Peter Rosendorff, Stephen Sheppard, Stergios Skaperdas, Constantinos Syropoulos, Robert H. Topel, Marijke Verpoorten

    • Hardcover $8.75 £6.99
    • Paperback $25.00 £20.00