Tone Hansen

  • We Are Living on a Star

    We Are Living on a Star

    Tone Hansen and Marit Paasche

    We Are Living on a Star takes its title from a tapestry by Hannah Ryggen that hung in the government building known as the “High-Rise” in Oslo until July 22, 2011. The explosion that took place that day left the tapestry with a gash in the lower portion. Like a wound that has healed, this tear is barely visible now after meticulous reconstruction, although a slight scar remains, a testament to what can be described as a brutal rent in the fabric of our society.

    In a short span of time, the events of July 22 transformed normality as we knew it and, consequently, the predictable as well. The normal was no longer familiar, and the abnormal was no longer associated with the foreign. The artists and writers participating in We Are Living on a Star (the book and the exhibition it accompanies) contend with a range of issues relating to history, contemporaneity, normality, and expression. The result is an open and inquiring look at our own time.

    This catalogue is published in conjunction with the exhibition “Vi lever på en stjerne” (We Are Living on a Star), Henie Onstad Kunstsenter (HOK), Norway, January 30–April 27, 2014.

    Artists Burak Arkıan, Doug Ashford, Julian Blaue, Martin Braathen, Marius Engh, Marthe Ramm Fortun, Hanne Friis, Else Marie Hagen, Silje Linge Haaland, Per-Oskar Leu, Lotte Konow Lund, Jumana Manna, Eline McGeorge, Eva Rothschild, Hannah Ryggen, Ahlam Shibli, Superunion Architects, Javier Téllez, Even Smith Wergeland

    Contributors Boris Buden, Ekaterina Degot, Tone Hansen, Thomas Keenan, Marit Paasche, Renata Salecl; literary fragments from Aniara by Harry Martinsson and The Defeat by Nordahl Grieg

    Copublished with Henie Onstad Kunstsenter

    • Paperback $38.00
  • The Phantom of Liberty

    The Phantom of Liberty

    Contemporary Art and the Pedagogical Paradox

    Tone Hansen and Lars Bang Larsen

    One of the few things we have in common in contemporary society is the future of our children. But it seems that even the “we” of childhood, of learning and free play, has turned into a common ground for instrumentalization and competition. Today, the pedagogical paradox—Kant's meditation on the paradox that the subject's predisposition for freedom must be learned—is increasingly lost in governmental obsession about the efficiency of education and schooling. From another perspective, artists are addressing questions of childhood, play, and pedagogy.

    What ideological and moral transformations is the school system currently undergoing? What do the psychiatric diagnoses and treatments mean that are increasingly applied to children and youth? What happened to the reform pedagogy of the twentieth century? What is the status of childhood in the era of the consuming child and the playing adult? These are some of the questions addressed by The Phantom of Liberty, which sets out to reestablish a social and aesthetic dialogue between visual art and psychology, philosophy, pedagogy, and critical journalism.

    The Phantom of Liberty: Contemporary Art and the Pedagogical Paradox is published following the exhibition “Learning for Life” curated by Tone Hansen and Ane Hjort Guttu, November 11, 2012–February 24, 2013, at Henie Onstad Kunstsenter (HOK).

    Copublished with Henie Onstad Kunstsenter

    Contributors Emanuel Almborg, Nils Christie, Carl Hegemann, Ane Hjort Guttu, Dave Hullfish Bailey, Adelita Husni-Bey, Carsten Rene Jørgensen, Lars Bang Larsen, Sharon Lockhart, Magnus Marsdal, Marit Paasche, Allan Sekula

    • Paperback $36.00
  • No Is Not an Answer

    No Is Not an Answer

    On the Work of Marie-Louise Ekman

    Tone Hansen and Maria Lind

    No Is Not an Answer is the largest presentation of Marie-Louise Ekman's art ever featured in the form of a book. As one of the most influential artists in Sweden in the postwar period, Ekman was both part of Swedish pop and the rebellious underground in the '60s and '70s. She created a unique body of proto-feminist work, which draws equally from the playful imagination of a young woman and popular culture in the social welfare state. She has directed more than a dozen films, TV series, and plays, and since 2009 she has been the director of the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm.

    The result of a collaboration between Tensta konsthall and the Henie Onstad Kunstsenter and an offshoot of the exhibition “Doing what you want: Marie-Louise Ekman accompanied by Sister Corita Kent, Mladen Stilinović and Martha Wilson,” the publication aims to show the contemporary aspect of Ekman's works and to examine the wider international context surrounding the start of her career.

    • Paperback $34.00