Vanessa Joan Müller

  • Marcel Odenbach

    Marcel Odenbach

    Beweis zu nichts / Proof of Nothing

    Jörg Heiser, Maria Muhle, Vanessa Joan Müller, and Nicolaus Schafhausen

    Marcel Odenbach is widely known as a pioneering video artist—however, the connections between his video works and his ongoing works on paper call for due recognition. Many of his works reflect the lasting impact of National Socialism up to the present day, all the while bestowing a universal perspective on what is usually constituted as a specifically German concern. Reflections on the familiar and the foreign, elements of his own biography, the interplay between subjective remembrance and collective memory—all of these are crucial themes in his work, which make their claim on the aesthetic as well as the political level.

    Departing from his eponymous exhibition at Kunsthalle Wien, this publication examines new works by Odenbach and contextualizes them within a broader context. Named after an early poem by Ingeborg Bachmann, the exhibition reflected the atmosphere of the postwar period that dominates Bachmann's poetry, which itself is shaped as much by the search for authenticity and truthfulness as it is by the traumatic memory of the past. The exhibited works developed a series of interconnected motifs linking memorial remembrance of the atrocities committed during the Nazi period to individual memories. The complex history of the African continent was likewise presented through film as well as collages that created multilayered vectors pointing as much from the past toward the present as vice versa.

    Copublished with Kunsthalle Wien

    • Hardcover $32.00
  • Leonard Qylafi

    Leonard Qylafi

    Occurrence in Present Tense—Ndodhi në kohën e tashme

    Vanessa Joan Müller

    Recollection is the presence of the past in the here and now; it shapes our understanding of our places and lives, their histories and changes. As experience becomes fact, the past turns into objective matter. Leonard Qylafi's artistic practice takes such material records as books, films, or photos as points of departure for examining this process of change. His paintings and videos are as much investigations of the processes shaping the narration of events in his home country of Albania as they are reflections on the nature of the image as such. Conceived for the Albanian Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale, the publication features images of Qylafi's works alongside extensive documentation and notes of his source material. Edited by Vanessa Joan Müller with an essay by Cathryn Drake, Occurrence in Present Tense reminds us that “there is no single memory, only a plural understanding of history molded by the interests of the present.”

    • Paperback $27.00
  • Function Follows Vision, Vision Follows Reality

    Function Follows Vision, Vision Follows Reality

    Frederick Kiesler, Luca Lo Pinto, Vanessa Joan Müller, and Frederick and Lillian Kiesler Private Foundation

    This collection of unpublished or rare texts by Frederick Kiesler written between 1927 and 1957 is published on the occasion of the exhibition “Function Follows Vision, Vision Follows Reality” at Kunsthalle Wien (May 27–August 23, 2015), curated by Luca Lo Pinto and Vanessa Joan Müller. The exhibition, developed in cooperation with the Austrian Frederick and Lillian Kiesler Private Foundation, focuses on Kiesler's ideas on display, and juxtaposes works of contemporary artists with a number of original drawings by Kiesler. Views of the exhibition are included in the pages of this publication.

    With works by Leonor Antunes, Olga Balema, Céline Condorelli, Morton Feldman, Annette Kelm, Friedrich Kiesler, Charlotte Moth, Francesco Pedraglio, Luca Trevisani, Nicole Wermers

    Copublished with Kunsthalle Wien

    • Paperback $18.00
  • New Ways of Doing Nothing

    New Ways of Doing Nothing

    Vanessa Joan Müller, Cristina Ricupero, and Nicolaus Schafhausen

    “New Ways of Doing Nothing,” a group exhibition that took place at Kunsthalle Wien in 2014, devoted itself to artistic production that opposes activity and instead gives an affirmative slant to forms of doing nothing or refraining—a major influence being the titular character of Hermann Melville's “Bartleby the Scriviner: A Story of Wall Street.” The book presents the displayed works and artists, but also continues the process that led to the exhibition. Included along with a conversation between the curators is a text collage of reprints and excerpts that introduces those artists and thinkers who, in the words of Bartleby, “prefer not to.”

    Featuring work by Robert Breer, Alejandro Cesarco, Étienne Chambaud, Claire Fontaine, Natalie Czech, Oskar Dawicki, Edith Dekyndt, Mathias Delplanque, Heinrich Dunst, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Marina Faust, Ryan Gander, Lasse Schmidt Hansen, Julia Hohenwarter, Karl Holmqvist, Sofia Hultén, Jiří Kovanda, Rivane Neuenschwander, Georges Perec / Bernard Queysanne, Superflex, Mario García Torres

    Copublished with Kunsthalle Wien

    Contributors Giorgio Agamben, Claire Fontaine, Gilles Deleuze, Julius Gavroche, Paul Lafargue, Vanessa Joan Müller, Cristina Ricupero, Tereza Stejskalová, Enrique Vila-Matas

    • Paperback $26.00
  • The Brancusi Effect

    The Brancusi Effect

    An Archival Impulse

    Vanessa Joan Müller and Nicolaus Schafhausen

    The Brancusi Effect begins with the Romanian sculptor Constantin Brancusi. Cited as one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century, Brancusi's considerations of the pedestal launched a reorientation of the relationship between object, viewer, and space, influencing Minimalism and the aesthetic of the installation as a whole. Brancusi's work, its modular structure and adaptability, can be seen as a point of departure; the autonomy of artworks abates in favor of a reflection on their historical and institutional positioning.

    Taking this influence into account, the exhibition and publication collect Brancusi's original photographic documentation. The installation reflects the recent currency of the sculptural within contemporary art while referencing Brancusi's sensibility.

    Copublished with Kunsthalle Wien on the occasion of the exhibition “The Brancusi Effect,” Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, June 12–September 21, 2014, and in collaboration with Dan Gunn, Berlin.

    Contributors Alessio delli Castelli, Paola Mola

    • Paperback $32.00
  • Birgit Megerle

    Birgit Megerle

    Meike Behm, Dirk von Lowtzow, and Vanessa Joan Müller

    Birgit Megerle's figurative and abstract paintings are characterized by an artificial, rigid, and stage-like atmosphere. The female characters featured in her works are poised with a determination and a readiness to act, and while based in a tradition of representational painting, they are eerily unreal and remote. Despite their contemporary references, the works feel as though they have fallen out of time. Associations with performative events are amplified by Megerle's installations, in which the works are hung not only on the wall, but also laid on the floor or presented as mise en scène. Although the works contain figurative elements, comprehensible narratives do not unfold, with Megerle challenging social constraints and norms without proffering solutions. This exhibition catalogue accompanied Megerle's exhibition at Kunsthalle Lingen in the fall of 2010.

    • Paperback $32.00
  • Adorno, Volume 1

    Adorno, Volume 1

    The Possibility of the Impossible

    Michael Hirsch, Vanessa Joan Müller, and Nicolaus Schafhausen

    The first volume of Adorno: The Possibility of the Impossible comprises theoretical essays which investigate the relevance of Adorno's critical theory for the present. The tight connection between individual observations in aesthetics and cultural criticism, on the one hand, and the large speculations of social theory and the history of philosophy, on the other, that is found in Adorno's own work is taken as a point of departure in many passages. The difference—disparity, even—in the varied attitudes toward the content of Adorno's theory is evident. Seen from the perspective of the present, this multiple rereading is directed at fragments of a thought that has preserved its radicality even when abstracted from its immediate historical context. Both publications—Adorno: The Impossibility of the Impossible Vol. I and Vol. II—accompany an exhibition at the Frankfurter Kunstverein on the occasion of the 100th birthday of Theodor W. Adorno.

    Contributors Norbert Bolz, Peter Bürger, Alex Demirovic, Diedrich Diederichsen, Alexander García Düttmann, Michael Hirsch, Christoph Menke, Willem van Reijen, Martin Seel

    • Paperback $26.00
  • Adorno, Volume 2

    Adorno, Volume 2

    The Possibility of the Impossible

    Michael Hirsch, Vanessa Joan Müller, and Nicolaus Schafhausen

    Volume II of Adorno: The Possibility of the Impossible documents the exhibition that looks at the connection between contemporary art and Adorno's writings, with the visual arts becoming a central platform for comparison to Adorno's main subjects. The publication illustrates the works exhibited and discusses the relationship between autonomy and sovereignty.

    Artists included are Carl Andre, Samuel Beckett, Martin Boyce, André Cadere, Martin Creed, Thomas Demand, Jason Dodge, Maria Eichhorn, Peter Friedl, Isa Genzken, Liam Gillick, Henrik Plenge Jacobsen, Euan McDonald, John Massey, Jonathan Monk, Sarah Morris, Bruce Nauman, Mathias Poledna, Stephen Prina, Florian Pumhösl, Ad Reinhardt, Gerhard Richter, Markus Schinwald, Andreas Slominski, Lawrence Weiner, Christopher Williams, Cerith Wyn Evans.

    • Paperback $26.00
  • Marcel Odenbach

    Marcel Odenbach

    Blenden/Blinds

    Vanessa Joan Müller, Nicolaus Schafhausen, and Frankfurter Kunstverein

    According to author Kobena Mercer, “Odenbach's video art insists upon an attitude of openness towards uncertainty about the world. In this respect, his art criss-crosses the structural hybridization of video-based conceptualism with reflection on the lived experience of globalization.”

    Since the mid-1970s, Marcel Odenbach has produced an extensive body of tapes, performances, drawings and installations, and has gained international recognition as one of Germany's most important artists working in video. His works engage in a provocative discourse on the construction of the “self” in relation to historical and cultural representation. Using excerpts from films and newsreels, along with his own footage, the artist explores the ways images of the past shape our perception of the present. With its comprehensive illustrations and essays, including a text by the artist, this book features Odenbach's most important works.

    Contributors Dan Cameron, Jörg Heiser, Kobena Mercer, Vanessa Joan Müller, Marcel Odenbach, Astrid Wege

    • Paperback $14.95

Contributor

  • Notes on Contemporary Art in Kosovo

    Notes on Contemporary Art in Kosovo

    Katharina Schendl

    Writings on the art scene of Kosovo over the past twenty years.

    In the 1990s Kosovars felt—as many other countries in the Balkan region did—the urgency to shape their own scene: to search for national identity, to continue or end political conflicts, to find a language to express social and political developments, or simply to continue their practice in new, unstable times. This collection of writings and interviews offers insights from the perspectives of curators, artists, and philosophers on the latest artistic developments. They foster reflection on how a local, prospering scene continuously raises new questions and addresses undiscovered topics—while reckoning with the region's historical struggles Kosovo's staus as the youngest state within Europe.

    • Paperback $20.00
  • Four or Five Roses

    Four or Five Roses

    Peter Friedl

    So far, the work of Austrian artist Peter Friedl (*1960) has managed to elude stylistic classification. Investigating the social, political, and cultural realities at work in institutionalized practice, his projects have been called “conceptual, aesthetic acts”—usually they are subtle forays into institutional criticism with political insight.

    Four or Five Roses continues Friedl's exploration of the stereotypical language of the monologue genre. The book contains some 45 children's “monologues,” edited by the artist from numerous interviews and conversations recorded on playgrounds in South Africa. Faithfully transcribed and translated into English from different South African languages (Afrikaans, Northern and Southern Suthu, Zulu, Xhosa...), the “edited monologue” then becomes a hybrid genre, both fictionalised speech and serious counter-voice. What is ultimately at stake is how discursive strategies operate as a political tool, endlessly reshaped and manipulated for the sake of persuasion. The texts are accompanied by color illustrations of the actual South African playgrounds.

    • Paperback $19.95
  • Isa Genzken

    Isa Genzken

    Urlaub

    Nicolaus Schafhausen and Caroline Schneider

    Isa Genzken's sculpture is concerned with what surrounds us and shapes our everyday existence, from design, advertising, and the media to her most enduring subject, architecture and the urban environment. The artist is interested in the ways in which aesthetic styles – the unadorned angularity of modernist architecture for example –embody and enforce political and social ideologies.

    Urlaub constitutes Genzken's multilayered inquiry into the meaning of work and leisure. “Artists never take vacations,” Genzken says, “but the entire art system urgently needs a vacation.”

    Vanessa Joan Müller examines how Genzken's recent work establishes a critical discourse about architecture and design as exposed sites of aesthetic and cultural formation. Discussing the artist's “beach house” series, small architectural models with playfully defined interiors/exteriors, the author writes that one can read them “as a pointed commentary on postmodern architecture, as a subtle attack on the predominant taste of the times. When Genzken gets involved with the miniaturization of this kind of architecture – which could be realized in principle – turning it into small-format sculpture, the procedure emphasizes the ambiguity of the subject toward a particular 'resort-style beach life'. The aspect of playing with form and material should therefore not deceive: the beach house is a status symbol that can only be found on the exclusive beaches of this world, and hence it is simultaneously the object of envy and a hallmark of distinction.”

    This book was published on the occasion of the exhibition "Urlaub" at Frankfurter Kunstverein, May 27 - August 6, 2000.

    • Paperback $19.95