William H. Dutton

William H. Dutton is Director of the Oxford Internet Institute, Professor of Internet Studies, and Professorial Fellow of Balliol College at the University of Oxford.

  • World Wide Research

    World Wide Research

    Reshaping the Sciences and Humanities

    William H. Dutton and Paul W. Jeffreys

    Experts examine ways in which the use of increasingly powerful and versatile digital information and communication technologies are transforming research activities across all disciplines.

    Advances in information and communication technology are transforming the way scholarly research is conducted across all disciplines. The use of increasingly powerful and versatile computer-based and networked systems promises to change research activity as profoundly as the mobile phone, the Internet, and email have changed everyday life. This book offers a comprehensive and accessible view of the use of these new approaches—called “e-Research”—and their ethical, legal, and institutional implications. The contributors, leading scholars from a range of disciplines, focus on how e-Research is reshaping not only how research is done but also, and more important, its outcomes. By anchoring their discussion in specific examples and case studies, they identify and analyze a promising set of practical developments and results associated with e-Research innovations. The contributors, who include Geoffrey Bowker, Christine Borgman, Paul Edwards, Tim Berners-Lee, and Hal Abelson, explain why and how e-Research activity can reconfigure access to networks of information, expertise, and experience, changing what researchers observe, with whom they collaborate, how they share information, what methods they use to report their findings, and what knowledge is required to do this. They discuss both the means of e-Research (new research-centered computational networks) and its purpose (to improve the quality of world-wide research).

    • Hardcover $14.75 £12.95
    • Paperback $8.75 £6.99
  • Transforming Enterprise

    Transforming Enterprise

    The Economic and Social Implications of Information Technology

    William H. Dutton, Brian Kahin, Ramon O'Callaghan, and Andrew W. Wyckoff

    Innovators across all sectors of society are using information and communication technology to reshape economic and social activity. Even after the boom—and despite the bust—the process of structural change continues across organizational boundaries. Transforming Enterprise considers the implications of this change from a balanced, post-bust perspective. Original essays examine the impact on the economy as a whole, and, in particular, the effect on productivity; the role of information technology in creating and using knowledge—especially knowledge that leads to innovation; and new organizational models, as seen in the interlocking and overlapping networks made possible by the Internet. The authors also analyze structural changes in specific sectors, including the effect of information technology on the automotive industry, demand-driven production and flexible value chains in the personal computer industry, and new models of outsourced manufacturing in the electronics industry. The final essays examine the societal implications of the diverse ways that information technologies are used—across individuals, groups, communities, and nations—and considering questions of access and the digital divide.

    • Hardcover $17.75 £14.95
    • Paperback $32.00 £25.00

Contributor

  • Remaking the News

    Remaking the News

    Essays on the Future of Journalism Scholarship in the Digital Age

    Pablo J. Boczkowski and C. W. Anderson

    Leading scholars chart the future of studies on technology and journalism in the digital age.

    The use of digital technology has transformed the way news is produced, distributed, and received. Just as media organizations and journalists have realized that technology is a central and indispensable part of their enterprise, scholars of journalism have shifted their focus to the role of technology. In Remaking the News, leading scholars chart the future of studies on technology and journalism in the digital age.

    These ongoing changes in journalism invite scholars to rethink how they approach this dynamic field of inquiry. The contributors consider theoretical and methodological issues; concepts from the social science canon that can help make sense of journalism; the occupational culture and practice of journalism; and major gaps in current scholarship on the news: analyses of inequality, history, and failure.

    Contributors Mike Ananny, C. W. Anderson, Rodney Benson, Pablo J. Boczkowski, Michael X. Delli Carpini, Mark Deuze, William H. Dutton, Matthew Hindman, Seth C. Lewis, Eugenia Mitchelstein, W. Russell Neuman, Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, Zizi Papacharissi, Victor Pickard, Mirjam Prenger, Sue Robinson, Michael Schudson, Jane B. Singer, Natalie (Talia) Jomini Stroud, Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Rodrigo Zamith

    • Hardcover $40.00 £30.00