Yin-Wong Cheung

Yin-Wong Cheung is Hung Hing Ying Chair Professor of International Economics and Director of the Global Research Unit at City University of Hong Kong.

  • International Currency Exposure

    International Currency Exposure

    Yin-Wong Cheung and Frank Westermann

    Issues in debates about foreign currency exposure—the denomination of liabilities or assets in foreign currency.

    The foreign currency denomination of contracts in international transactions can lead to international currency exposure at the country level with important economic and policy implications. When debts are denominated in foreign currency and revenues in domestic currency, exchange rate fluctuations can result in balance sheet effects for countries with either net asset or liability positions. Moreover, currency mismatch between assets and liabilities can be a cause for crises in developing and emerging economies. This book looks at the issues surrounding foreign currency exposure in today's increasingly integrated world economy.

    The contributors draw on cross-country as well as country-specific data. They consider international currency risk after the Swiss franc ended its one-sided peg with the euro, for example, and the foreign exchange positions of firms in Turkey and Russia. Other contributors take macroeconomic perspectives, examining the potential effects of exchange rate realignment, the pressure to appreciate on countries with current account surpluses, and the currency exposure in international trade. Finally, contributors consider the issue from finance and political economy perspectives, addressing the phenomenon of the forward premium puzzle and discussing geopolitical aspects ascending currencies.

    Contributors Fatih Altunok, Huseyin Aytug, Agustín S. Bénétrix, Jörg Breitung, Paul De Grauwe, Eiji Fujii, Peter Garber, Juann H. Hung, Signe Krogstrup, Philip R. Lane, Katja Mann, Arif Oduncu, Gunther Schnabl, Maria V. Sokolova, Cédric Tille

    • Hardcover $37.00 £29.00
  • Global Interdependence, Decoupling, and Recoupling

    Global Interdependence, Decoupling, and Recoupling

    Yin-Wong Cheung and Frank Westermann

    Investigations of the propagation and influence of global shocks among the economies of developed and developing countries.

    One lens through which to view global economic interdependence and the spillover of shocks is that of decoupling (and then recoupling). Decoupling between developed and developing countries can be seen in the strong economic performance of China and India relative to that of the United States and Europe in the early 2000s. Recoupling then took place as developing countries sank along with the developed world during the deepening financial crisis of 2008. This volume examines patterns of global economic interdependence and the propagation of shocks in an increasingly integrated world economy.

    The contributors discuss such topics as the transmission of exogenous shocks; causes of business cycle synchronicity; the differences between global and regional shocks; the South-South trade relationship and its effect on decoupling; vertical specialization and Mexico's manufacturing exports; growth prospects in China, the United States, and Europe after the financial crisis; and the evolving role of the U.S. dollar in international monetary architecture.

    Contributors Helge Berger, Rossella Calvi, Yin-Wong Cheung, Gianluca Cubadda, Justino De La Cruz, Filippo di Mauro, Michael Dooley, Eiji Fujii, Linda S. Goldberg, Barbara Guardabascio, Alain Hecq, Hideaki Hirata, Robert B. Koopman, M. Ayhan Kose, Marco J. Lombardi, Steven Lugauer, Nelson C. Mark, Volker Nitsch, Christopher Otrok, Tuomas Antero Peltonen, Gabor Pula, Pierre L. Siklos, Zhi Wang, Shang-Jin Wei, Frank Westermann

    • Hardcover $7.75 £6.99
  • The Evolving Role of China in the Global Economy

    The Evolving Role of China in the Global Economy

    Yin-Wong Cheung and Jakob de Haan

    Experts analyze four factors in China's economic growth: exchange rate policy, savings and investments, monetary policy, and foreign direct investments.

    China is now the world's second largest economy and may soon overtake the United States as the world's largest. Despite its adoption of some free-market principles, China considers itself a “socialist-market economy,” suggesting that the government still plays a major role in the country's economic development. This book offers a systematic analysis of four factors in China's rapid economic growth: exchange rate policy, savings and investment, monetary policy and capital controls, and foreign direct investment (FDI).

    Contributors offer fresh perspectives on the undervaluation of the renminbi, the dollar peg, and China's macroeconomic relationships with the rest of the world. They review factors shaping China's saving dynamics and analyze the growth of the private sector despite limited access to external finance. They examine the monetary policy independence of the People's Bank of China, offshore markets for China's currency, and the effectiveness of China's capital controls. Finally, they consider Chinese FDI in terms of China's growing demand for energy and raw materials, exploring the factors that drive China's FDI in the conventional oil-producing countries and in Africa.

    • Hardcover $19.75 £14.99