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Computer Science and Intelligent Systems

Computer Science and Intelligent Systems

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What can artificial intelligence teach us about the mind? If AI’s underlying concept is that thinking is a computational process, then how can computation illuminate thinking? It’s a timely question. AI is all the rage, and the buzziest AI buzz surrounds adaptive machine learning: computer systems that learn intelligent behavior from massive amounts of data. This is what powers a driverless car, for example.

with Practical Examples in MOA

Today many information sources—including sensor networks, financial markets, social networks, and healthcare monitoring—are so-called data streams, arriving sequentially and at high speed. Analysis must take place in real time, with partial data and without the capacity to store the entire data set. This book presents algorithms and techniques used in data stream mining and real-time analytics.

How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing

In 1944, Britain led the world in electronic computing. By 1974, the British computer industry was all but extinct. What happened in the intervening thirty years holds lessons for all postindustrial superpowers. As Britain struggled to use technology to retain its global power, the nation’s inability to manage its technical labor force hobbled its transition into the information age. 

Making and Remaking the Modern Computer

Conceived in 1943, completed in 1945, and decommissioned in 1955, ENIAC (the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer) was the first general-purpose programmable electronic computer. But ENIAC was more than just a milestone on the road to the modern computer.

The Commodore Amiga

Long ago, in 1985, personal computers came in two general categories: the friendly, childish game machine used for fun (exemplified by Atari and Commodore products); and the boring, beige adult box used for business (exemplified by products from IBM). The game machines became fascinating technical and artistic platforms that were of limited real-world utility. The IBM products were all utility, with little emphasis on aesthetics and no emphasis on fun. Into this bifurcated computing environment came the Commodore Amiga 1000.

Foundations and Learning Algorithms

The mathematization of causality is a relatively recent development, and has become increasingly important in data science and machine learning. This book offers a self-contained and concise introduction to causal models and how to learn them from data.

Learn to Program While Solving Puzzles

This book builds a bridge between the recreational world of algorithmic puzzles (puzzles that can be solved by algorithms) and the pragmatic world of computer programming, teaching readers to program while solving puzzles. Few introductory students want to program for programming’s sake. Puzzles are real-world applications that are attention grabbing, intriguing, and easy to describe.

Affinity, Accelerators, Tasking, and SIMD

This book offers an up-to-date, practical tutorial on advanced features in the widely used OpenMP parallel programming model. Building on the previous volume, Using OpenMP: Portable Shared Memory Parallel Programming (MIT Press), this book goes beyond the fundamentals to focus on what has been changed and added to OpenMP since the 2.5 specifications.

An Introduction to Computational Geometry

Reissue of the 1988 Expanded Edition with a new foreword by Léon Bottou

A History of the Computer Services Industry

The computer services industry has worldwide annual revenues of nearly a trillion dollars and employs millions of workers, but is often overshadowed by the hardware and software products industries. In this book, Jeffrey Yost shows how computer services, from consulting and programming to data analytics and cloud computing, have played a crucial role in shaping information technology—in making IT work.

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