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Joel S. Levine

Joel S. Levine is Senior Research Scientist in the Atmospheric Sciences Division, NASA Langley Research Center and is the Principal Investigator of NASA's research program on global biomass burning, Biospheric Research Program, Office of Space Sciences and Applications.

Titles by This Editor

Remote Sensing and Modeling of Biomass Burning, and Biomass Burning in the Boreal Forest
Edited by Joel S. Levine

The 1989 report of the National Research Council, Global Change and Our Common Future states: "Our planet and global environment are witnessing the most profound changes in the brief history of the human species. Human activity is the major agent of those changes -- depletion of stratospheric ozone, the threat of global warming, deforestation, acid precipitation, the extinction of species, and others that have not become apparent." One human activity that leads to all of these global changes is the burning of the world's living and dead vegetation.

Biomass Burning in the Tropical and Temperate Ecosystems
Edited by Joel S. Levine

The 1989 report of the National Research Council, Global Change and Our Common Future states: "Our planet and global environment are witnessing the most profound changes in the brief history of the human species. Human activity is the major agent of those changes -- depletion of stratospheric ozone, the threat of global warming, deforestation, acid precipitation, the extinction of species, and others that have not become apparent." One human activity that leads to all of these global changes is the burning of the world's living and dead vegetation.

Atmospheric, Climatic, and Biospheric Implications
Edited by Joel S. Levine

The burning of biomass - forests, grasslands, and agricultural fields after the harvest - is much more widespread and extensive than previously believed; most biomass burning is thought to be initiated by humans and is on the increase. This comprehensive volume is the first to consider biomass burning as a global phenomenon and to assess its impact on the atmosphere, on climate, and on the biosphere itself.