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Richard Layard

Richard Layard is Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

Titles by This Author

Pain and Progress

In their earlier report, Reform in Eastern Europe, the WIDER group assessed the main building blocks of a successful transition in Eastern Europe: stabilization, price liberalization, privatization, and restructuring. For the last three years this group of leading economists has been heavily involved in the reform process. In this new report, they take stock, returning to the original themes and assessing progress and prospects, particularly in Russia.Stabilization in the major Central European countries was done very much by the book.

The Alternatives

This sequel to Reform in Eastern Europe is a report on one of the most pressing issues for countries with economies in transition and their neighbors. Focusing on the problem of East-West migration, the authors clearly delineate and promote the notion of European free trade and capital flows as a means of raising productivity and increasing worker stability in the East and of reducing income gaps between countries.

How can the new governments of Eastern Europe succeed in moving from centrally planned to freemarket economies? This incisive report identifies and describes the major policy choices to be made and discusses what will work and what will not.Reform in Eastern Europe provides a comprehensive, easily read statement of reform policy that stands in the mainstream of modern Western economics.

Titles by This Editor

Macroeconomic Papers from the Centre for European Policy Studies

Restoring Europe's Prosperity is the first annual produced by the Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), an independent research institution which focuses on the major medium- and long-term issues facing the European community and Western Europe both internally and internationally.

The breakup of the Soviet Union and the consequent extraordinary problems faced by Eastern European nations raise pressing economic questions. The case studies in this book examine significant parallels between the situation in Eastern Europe today and the issues facing Europe and Japan after World War II, offering insights on what kinds of policy actions will be most effective in this difficult period of reconstruction.